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NostalgicChills's avatar

What benefits does one get from being a psychologist?

Asked by NostalgicChills (2759 points ) March 10th, 2011

I want to go to college and study Psychology, then eventually become a psychologist. What are some job opportunities someone with a degree in that field could obtain? (other than a school guidance counselor) And what does being a psychologist do to you emotionally?

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6 Answers

TexasDude's avatar

I was a psychology major for my first year of college before I switched to history.

Competition to get into graduate school for psychology is among the fiercest of all degrees. Basically, you have to eat, breathe, and sleep psychology to even have a prayer of a chance to get into a graduate program for psychology. Actual jobs are even more competitive, but once you are in the field for a while, the pay is pretty sweet. You also have the benefit of knowing that you are doing a world of good for people in need.

HOWEVER, you have to be aware that you will not be able to help everyone that comes to you. Some people are simply beyond help. Also, hearing people talk about their problems every single day can be incredibly emotionally taxing on you and you really have to have the patience of a saint to handle it.

I don’t mean to discourage you. If you think you have what it takes (extreme patience, research skills, writing skills, etc.) then go for it, by all means. It could potentially be very rewarding both emotionally/morally and financially.

Coloma's avatar

Yes, @Fiddle_Playing_Creole_Bastard said it all.
I’d only add that to be a truly successful therapist you must not discount the HUGE amount of self examination and work you must do to function at YOUR optimum level of health in the field.

Physician heal thyself.

NostalgicChills's avatar

@Fiddle_Playing_Creole_Bastard: Thank you so much! That really helped a lot.

TexasDude's avatar

@NostalgicChills, anytime. If you ever have any specific questions about practical psychology or the field of psychology, or whatever, just let me know. I studied it for years informally before majoring in it for that year, and I’ve retained a good bit of knowledge.

Kardamom's avatar

Potential jobs include: working for the military or the police or the government as a profiler, working for the military in screening potential recruits or helping troops to cope after they return from a war zone. Working for any huge corporation in the H.R. department to screen potential job candidates. Working for a hospital to help the employees in the high stress jobs (like the ER or children’s cancer wards) to cope. And being a social worker or a psychologist that deals strictly with coming into schools and other organizations after a tragedy has occurred (a trauma counselor).

seazen_'s avatar

A big, huge fucking head-ache is what one gets from being a shrink. But studying it is fun; and can be done online for free – from Yale even. Really.

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