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Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

Boring question #83: Which martial art style is better overall?

Asked by Hypocrisy_Central (21302 points ) July 19th, 2011

I know not all martial arts are the same or even alike, in spite of their appearance. Which is better over all? You have Kenpo karate, Bok Fu, Jeet Kune Do, Kajukenbo, Japanese styles of Aikido, Jujutsu, Korean Taekwondo, Hapkido, and that is before you get into Chinese Kung Fu, Wushu, and all the traditional style within that. Are some martial arts better at certain things? Such as Aikido being more suited for kicks, Kung Fu an all around attack and defense, and Jeet Kune Do, for tying up an opponent’s arms or using displacement of his weight to gain the upper hand? What would be the best at having a full arsenal to attack with but superior defense skill also?

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18 Answers

Cruiser's avatar

kyuki-do A mix of Tae-kwon-do, Hapkido, Judo and Kung-Fu and a weapon of your choice. It was the stuff not on the syllabus they taught me that was the most fun. The lesson usually started…“I am not supposed to teach you this”...

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@Cruiser I could not name them all, there are so many a lot people have never heard of, it would be dizzying; and that is before you get to the two dozen or so traditional styles of Wushu and kung fu. It is enough to make your head swim. Who outside Asia has heard of Bojuka or Kuk Sool Won?

ZEPHYRA's avatar

Kung-Fu.

poisonedantidote's avatar

Jeet Kune Do wins, mainly for it’s rejection of style and how it concentrates on efficiency. I don’t know any other martial art that has moves developed by studying newtonian physics.

Failing that, I vote for bashing them in the head with a stick when they are not looking.

Blackberry's avatar

Some martial arts master said no style is the best. Different styles may be better in certain situations, though. It’s like asking which car is the best.

Cruiser's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central I agree. I took a few other martial art styles and this style really stood out. I can only tell you that these instructors knew their stuff and taught us stuff that would blow your mind. All close quarter, hand to hand, bring on the pain stuff. No kicking and punching required.

gailcalled's avatar

I vote for cyber-bullying.

ucme's avatar

Smackyonthebotty.
I myself am a pink belt in the art of the tanned backside.

josie's avatar

I like Krav Maga. I know it is not shrouded in Asian mystery and there are no stories of traveling monks and bandits and stuff, but it is a great discipline for self defense and “neutralizing” an attack.

MRSHINYSHOES's avatar

Jeet Kune Do, followed by Kenpo Karate. Hapkido too maybe.

YoBob's avatar

It really depends on your goals. The term “over all” can mean anything. Better over all for self defense? Best over all for recreation? Best over all for heath benefits? Best overall for spiritual growth?

Personally I think Tai Chi (as it ties to Kung Fu) is the best overall. However, the trade off is that it takes much longer to learn/master than the more “hard/active” styles.

King_Pariah's avatar

I wouldn’t say that any one is better than any other really, but any combination of martial arts that would result in one knowing how to handle fighting on their feet as well as grappling on the ground makes for a deadly combo.

JessicaRTBH's avatar

I am studying Jujutsu at the moment and must say I really enjoy it – in addition to feeling like I could kick butt I am getting stronger by the day and have calmed my rage. It’s not about violence but discipline. They are all great just different. It depends what you’re hoping to take from it.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@YoBob It really depends on your goals. The term “over all” can mean anything The “over all” I mean, is over all best for defense, attack, ease of mastering and fitness.

YoBob's avatar

Ok

Best for Defense – Master the fine art of keeping your behind out of potentially volatile situations.

Best for Attack – I really wouldn’t know, but I would put mastery of the sniper rifle high on the list.

Ease of Mastering – Any worthwhile martial art will take a lifetime (or more) to master.

Fitness – Pretty much any of the “hard” (and I don’t mean difficult) forms will put you in pretty good shape if you are serious about working out.

Now… that being said. (and this is where many folks start to scoff and chuckle) mastery of a martial art involves both internal and external work. Varying styles place more emphasis on one over the other. If you are a young guy and really just interested in learning to be (your perception of) a “badass”, pick a hard form that emphasizes proper punching and kicking techniques (pretty much any one will do). You are sure to learn something. However, when you mature and begin to get a grasp of the internal component of the art, move to a soft form like Akido or the internal aspects of Kung Fu (Tai Chi). This is where the road to real mastery lies.

SuperMouse's avatar

With a black belt in Hapkido I am definitely biased but I say Hapkido all the way. I think that a style such as this that aims to kick ass with the
awesome throws, kicks, and
joint locks has it all over a
sparring style. I studied
Monkey Kung Fu and
Gracie/Machado Juijitsu in
tandem with Hapkido and I
think of myself as a very well
rounded martial artist and as a
woman there is no doubt in my
mind that I can defend myself –
even if an attacker managed to
take me to the ground. If I were to pick up another style it would be either Aikido or another style of Kung Fu.

Symbeline's avatar

I don’t know much about martial arts, but they’ve always fascinated me. Most of them are probably only useful if you have years of practice and experience under your belt. I’d sooner just whack some fucker with a bottle or some shit, and hope to get lucky.
But I think, if you’re good at it, and wanna fuck someone up real quick, muay thai kickboxing might rank up there somewhat?

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@SuperMouse What is the plus that makes Hapkido still effective if your attacker manages to get you to the ground? How can you counter that or keep the advantage?

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