Social Question

Aethelflaed's avatar

If the airport "porno scanners" didn't show you naked, would you be more inclined to go through them?

Asked by Aethelflaed (13702 points ) July 20th, 2011

It appears that the backspatter x-ray scanners, aka the porno scanners, at airports are getting an update. The new software will make it so that all that is seen is a “generic human form”, while still showing any objectionable objects that may pop up.

So, does this make you feel better about going through the scanners? Worse? Have you been refraining from using airlines since the scanners came out, and now you’ll resume flying?

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20 Answers

Judi's avatar

I went through it. The TSA didn’t seem to impressed.

FluffyChicken's avatar

No, because it has nothing to do with people seeing me naked (I’ve streaked on at least one occasion). It’s about x-rays being shot through my body.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

Yes and no. It’s a step in the right direction.

Aethelflaed's avatar

@ANef_is_Enuf I sense a “but…”

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

I never intend to fly again.

JLeslie's avatar

I don’t care about the naked, I care about the radiation.

ANef_is_Enuf's avatar

I know that by answering this question I am opening myself up to a debate, and I am so not there today.

@Aethelflaed although I recognize and respect a need for security measures, my privacy is extremely important to me. So much so that I would avoid flying ever again as a direct result of the current security measures that are in place. I also take issue with what I believe is racial profiling as a part of the process of who might be selected for additional screening.
Also, as mentioned above, I have issues with the radiation. The invasion of privacy is only part of the issue.

ragingloli's avatar

It is a violation of privacy, the right to informational self determination and basic human dignity.
That means “No”.

Aethelflaed's avatar

@ANef_is_Enuf Gotcha. I wasn’t sure if it was more like that you were terrified of being in an airplane, so even if they tailored security measures to your personal liking, you still wouldn’t fly.

@ragingloli What is “it” – the old measures, or the new measure… I’m not quite sure I’m following you.

jaytkay's avatar

I don’t care. While the security may be an inconvenience, it’s broad based and indiscriminate. They aren’t singling me out. I get the same treatment as the other million people flying that day. For the most part* people are not being targeted for their ethnicity or the books they are carrying or their religion.

* Yes I know there have been violations, but they are not every day occurrences

JLeslie's avatar

In my airport I never notice anyone being singled out, every single person goes through the naked thingy unless they opt out and go through a metal detector amd get frisked. The other places I have flown that is not always the case, but it seems fairly random. Plus, I don’t care if they single out more likely to do harm based on description, all I care is that they are not harrassed. Having them do a little extra screening is not harrassment to me.

satunnainen_narttu's avatar

If I were to fly, I’d rather be scanned then felt up. so this isn’t a big deal for me.

I haven’t flown since Labor Day 2001. Not because I’m afraid to fly because of 9/11, but because I can’t afford it. I appreciate a road trip over a flight anyway.

dappled_leaves's avatar

The pat downs are no less revealing, according to some… I just don’t want the radiation, thanks.

ddude1116's avatar

I don’t see anything wrong with the scanners, aside from the radiation, but I fly so infrequently, it isn’t a huge deal when I do. The amount of radiation is so minor that unless you’re a frequent flyer, there’s little harm. What bugs me about air travel is that flying just sucks.

whitenoise's avatar

I fly about once or twice a a week on average and I don’t care about my privacy in relation to these scanners. I do care about the radiation, more so since it is hard to get information on the levels and quality control that ensures proper operation.

Flying exposes people to radiation anyway (because of the altittude) and other security measures, like registering photos and finger prints and monitoring credit card transactions, invade my privacy in a far more threatening way.

downtide's avatar

I’d far rather be scanned than groped.

woodcutter's avatar

I haven’t flown since the late 80’s so I never think about it but really If the TSA wants to see my stuff I just don’t care. Since I haven’t even been in an airport in as many years I can only go by what TSA workers look like on TV and from what I have seen there aren’t very many of them in a position to judge our bodies.

Earthgirl's avatar

I am a very modest person so I do feel that the “naked” scanners are too intrusive. It does make me feel better that they have changed that. Like everyone else I’d rather not have uneccessary radiation. There are more and more environmental hazards and carcinogens in our environment. Over the course of a lifetime exposure to these risk factors accumulates in our bodies. A small risk snowballs into a large one.
It would never keep me from flying though. Why let a small imposition on your freedom create a large one?

snowberry's avatar

I’d like to say I’ll never fly again. But that’s probably not going to happen. I do not want to be exposed to the “safe” radiation in their scanners either. Last time I flew, I did not get the X-ray, and did not get felt up. It might be because what I was wearing left so little to the imagination, it wasn’t worth their time. I have learned a lesson. From now on I wear bike shorts and a tight fitting top.

It might be just the nasty TSA people at Philly International, but getting their pat down treatment with the smirks and “have a nice day” at the end of it was pretty nasty too. These TSA people have a long way to go before they’ll “get it”. Creeps.

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