General Question

DaphneT's avatar

Does anyone know what sago is?

Asked by DaphneT (5661 points ) January 24th, 2012

It is called for in a recipe for Buttermilk Soup. The measure is a ½ cup of sago. Any ideas?

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7 Answers

FutureMemory's avatar

Sago /ˈseɪɡoʊ/ is a starch extracted in the spongy center or pith, of various tropical palm stems, especially Metroxylon sagu. It is a major staple food for the lowland peoples of New Guinea and the Moluccas, where it is called saksak and sagu. A type of flour, called sago flour, is made from sago.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sago

digitalimpression's avatar

Sago /ˈseɪɡoʊ/ is a starch extracted in the spongy center or pith, of various tropical palm stems..

Damn you FM! xD

With a little further reading I found that you can substitute tapioca in recipes.. but if you want real sago.. gonna have to find an asian market or something. Apparently its hard to find.

DaphneT's avatar

This recipe comes from an undated cookbook featuring dairy products. The illustrations and introductory text suggest it is from the early 1950s. If sago was known then, what happened to it that it is not commonly known about today?

FutureMemory's avatar

@digitalimpression When I saw you starting to type I rushed to finish..haha.

digitalimpression's avatar

@FutureMemory Well played sir. Well… played.

@DaphneT No idea.

keobooks's avatar

http://www.foodsubs.com/ThickenStarch.html

According to this, it’s used as a thickener and not for it’s flavor. Tapioca pearls are a suggested substitute. I bet those would be easier to find.

picante's avatar

I believe that cornstarch can be used interchangeably. In fact, and maybe I dreamt this, there may have been a cornstarch branded “Sago” in times past. I have the clearest vision of the box, but again, I may have dreamed it.

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