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WestRiverrat's avatar

What do you think of the Oglala Sioux Tribe suing beer makers?

Asked by WestRiverrat (19848 points ) February 12th, 2012

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What would happen if the stores in question refused to sell to the tribal members just because of their race?

Will suing the beer companies stop the sale of beer near the reservation?

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6 Answers

marinelife's avatar

It is unfortunate that American Indians have a genetic pre-disposition toward alcoholism. I do not think that you can blame the makers of alcohol though, Because alcohol can be homemade.

They need more programs to make people aware of it. No one can stop someone from drinking who is determined to drink.

CWOTUS's avatar

I have approximately the same low opinion of this suit – and those bringing it – as I do for the War on (Some) Drugs and those prosecuting that.

Prohibition didn’t work, according to these geniuses, because we “didn’t do it right”. Fools.

bkcunningham's avatar

It is the same as class action lawsuits against tobacco companies. People are looking for fast cash and want to blame someone else for their own actions. I saw where the tribe is getting audited by the IRS. Sucks to be them. What happened to accountability?

http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/irs-audits-oglala-sioux-tribe/article_bc626e9c-5214-11e1-ae6b-001871e3ce6c.html

zenvelo's avatar

@bkcunningham How can you describe a suit like this or the tobacco suits as fast cash? These cases take years. And in the tobacco cases, the tobacco companies targeted people and rebalanced the chemicals in cigarettes to increase the addiction rate, used duplicitous advertising to claim their cigarettes were healthy, plotted to discredit studies showing the harm of cigarettes, and funded studies to show tobacco as safe.

My mind is not made up on these suits against beer companies, but to discredit it before there is a discussion of the stores and companies selling over 100 cases of beer per person per year is to not look at what is actually going on there.

The IRS audit is on occasional cash payments of $200 from the tribe to tribal members. No one is getting rich $200 at a time.

john65pennington's avatar

This audit should be interesting. On several occasions, I have been inside the Office of Indian Affairs in my city. I could not believe the sight I was seeing. Two and three new copying machines stacked three high on the walls around each room. Then, the words came to me, “use it or lose it”. Words used frequently in the Federal Government.

john65pennington's avatar

On most tribal reservations, the name of the game is cigarettes, beer, and casinos. They are sheltered from the IRS by many loopholes.

There is no telling what amount of money has gone unaccounted for by these groups.

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