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thequestion123's avatar

Where to find prokaryotic cells.

Asked by thequestion123 (222 points ) August 16th, 2012

What tissue, organ AND organ system can you find the prokaryotic cells?

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38 Answers

gailcalled's avatar

Is this for HS biology?

thequestion123's avatar

yes it is but i couldnt find any answers for this on google.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Have you tried your Bio textbook?

thequestion123's avatar

don’t have one yet. this is for summer work.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@thequestion123 You’re doing summer work without a textbook or an instructor ? ?

thequestion123's avatar

Yes. they gave us the papers and said for us to do them.

thequestion123's avatar

And plus, this is my first year of high school

BhacSsylan's avatar

Well, let’s start on this: what’s a prokaryotic cell?

thequestion123's avatar

A prokaryotic cell is a cell that does not have a nucleus

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@thequestion123 ...and never had a nucleus. Anything in the human body has had or currently has a nucleus. So . . not in tissue or organ in a body.

thequestion123's avatar

There found in bacteria i believe right? and spread diseases and invade other bacteria.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

Look up the definition and find examples of prokaryotic cells.

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Is your question missing a word? It’s much easier to answer if the question is ”In what tissue, organ and organ system can you find prokaryotic cells?”

thequestion123's avatar

Yes, that is the correct way to say it.

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Okay, then answer this question: where in the body do you find bacteria?

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

More specifically: where should you find bacteria? You can find it everywhere, but where does it play a role?

thequestion123's avatar

it plays a role in your body to help you digest and it gives you the k vitamins that you need.

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Right. So which organ system is that?

Response moderated (Unhelpful)
thequestion123's avatar

Digestive system

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Good. So that’s the answer to part of the question. The digestive system is the organ system. Now you need to figure out which organ within the digestive system is home to the bacteria.

thequestion123's avatar

i think i got that to. the esophagus. right?

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Nope. The esophagus is primarily for transferring food down into the stomach. You’re looking for something lower. Here’s a hint: the bacteria in question are often called “gut flora.”

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

P.S. We’re allowed to help you with your homework, but we’re not allowed to just give you the answer. That’s why I’m working though it with you like this. I know that’s not as easy as finding the answer on Google, but it will help you work things out for yourself in the future.

thequestion123's avatar

its in your gut right?

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Yes, but your gut refers to an area. There are several organs in that area. Try putting “gut flora” into Google or Wikipedia and see what you find.

thequestion123's avatar

is it the colon?

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Good. It is the colon, as well as the large intestine. Now figure out what kind of tissue is there.

thequestion123's avatar

google says the Mucosa tissue???

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Yes, the bacteria is found in the mucosa (which is a kind of epithelial tissue, but I would include both terms because “mucosa” is a pretty common way of describing it).

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

So now you have the answer to all three parts of your question: prokaryotic cells can be found in the mucosa (a kind of epithelial tissue) of the colon and large intestine, which are organs in the digestive system.

thequestion123's avatar

Thanks ALOT. That helped so much.

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

You’re welcome! But remember, you did almost all of it yourself. I just kept throwing questions at you until you collected all the answers. So good job to you, too!

Jeruba's avatar

And a cheer for the Socratic method, @JeSuisRickSpringfield.

BhacSsylan's avatar

Nice, thanks for picking up where i started, @JeSuisRickSpringfield. Yay for learning!

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@JeSuisRickSpringfield Awesome friggin job. I saw the question this afternoon and came back tonight and saw 34 answers so I looked. Text book job of helping new jellies.

gasman's avatar

@JeSuisRickSpringfield Very nice GA :) One quibble: The gut flora aren’t really in the mucosa, they’re in the lumen – the open space enclosed by the colon, where digestive residue is processed into feces. I suppose it depends on what you mean by ”in the mucosa.” The mucosal epithelial cells that line the lumen of the colon are not, for the most part, invaded by bacterial cells. Our colons and our gut flora have co-evolved a mutually beneficial commensal relationship.

Skin is often considered an organ, too – indeed the largest in the body. Since epidermis also hosts a mixed bacterial flora (completely different from the gut, thank goodness), prokaryotic cells are also found on the exterior of skin.

JeSuisRickSpringfield's avatar

Aw, thanks everyone!

@gasman You are completely correct, of course. But since the lumen isn’t a tissue, I assumed the question was being asked less literally.

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