General Question

jca's avatar

How much is a gallon of milk where you live?

Asked by jca (26800 points ) 3 months ago

I bought a gallon of milk yesterday at a regular supermarket (A&P) and it was $4.99.

I was going to look at the gas station and check out their price, but I forgot.

I usually buy milk at Costco, and it’s about $2.79 per gallon. It’s cheaper for me to buy a gallon there than to buy a half gallon at a regular store, and even if I don’t need a gallon, it pays for me to get it there. Getting the milk alone from Costco makes my annual membership worthwhile.

How much is milk, per gallon, where you live?

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70 Answers

KNOWITALL's avatar

$3.29 2% gallon, Missouri

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

The sale price is $4.99/gallon.

Buttonstc's avatar

Kroger usually has it on sale for $2,50.

Lately, however, it has not been on sale at that price so its $2.69.

I’m in Michigan about an hour Northwest of Detroit. I love milk and drink a lot of it so I’m glad to see that prices are pretty reasonable here compared to other parts of the country :)

zenvelo's avatar

$4.78 for two half gallons of non fat rBGH free in Northern California at a premium market.

LilCosmo's avatar

$2.19 at Costco in the Midwest.

tom_g's avatar

$3.39 to $3.69 per half gallon. Eastern MA.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@tom_g For a HALF GALLON, geesh. How much is a gallon of ice cream then $10?

tom_g's avatar

@KNOWITALL – Ice cream is $3.50 – $4.99 per pint.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@tom_g See, you could come to Missouri and have your own McMansion and have a nice fat bank account, too. Go fishing at the lake and canoe down streams and rivers. That’s pretty much why we’re growing in population, cheap cost of living.

Seek's avatar

$4.49 at WinnDixie (extends middle finger)
$3.99 at Walmart, which I hate.
$3.69 at Aldi, but it sours faster.

We used to have a million cattle ranches in my area, until the damned suburbs exploded. Now milk and beef are WAY too goddamn expensive.

JLeslie's avatar

I buy organic milk $3.59—$4.29 for a half gallon. Sometimes it is more, but I don’t buy it above $4.29. That might not help your survey since it is organic.

Seek's avatar

Where the heck are you getting organic milk for under $4 a gallon? My prices are for standard, cheap-ass store brand milk. I might need to move to Pinellas.

1TubeGuru's avatar

Milk is around thee bucks a gallon in Maryland if I buy it from Aldi or Costco.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Seek_Kolinahr It’s cheap here, too. I buy the chocolate soy for aorund $3 a half gallon.

Seek's avatar

Yeah, but you live in Farmland. @JLeslie lives near me! That’s just not fair!

JLeslie's avatar

My prices were for a half gallon.

Seek's avatar

Ah. That makes more sense. Sorry, I take milk prices very seriously. ^_^

flip86's avatar

$3.99 for store brand(Hannaford)and $4.49 for Oakhurst Dairy brand.

dxs's avatar

I can’t believe I can’t remember! I used to shop there all the time. I think it’s $2.49 for generic brand whole milk. This was in eastern Mass as well. Don’t take my word for it, but I’ll check at my store tomorrow.

hug_of_war's avatar

2.50 usually on sale at Meijer in Ohio. I think it’s normally 2.79 but it’s on sale at least ¾ weeks.

ibstubro's avatar

I’m north of @KNOWITALL in Missouri, and I think it’s around $3 a gallon here. I don’t use a lot and Prairie Farms still packages quarts in cardboard…I bought a quart of whole today 1–6, for $1.49 and the best by date is 2–13.

Only quarts come in cardboard. I guess it lasts too long.

I also bought a half gallon of soy for $2.68.

Seaofclouds's avatar

$3.75 – $4.25 for a gallon of store brand whole milk in Central PA.

downtide's avatar

In the UK the largest size we can buy in supermarkets is 6 pints which is ¾ gallon, that’s about £1.50 in Asda & Tesco. Doing the maths, that’s about £2 or US$3.30 a gallon. From somewhere like Aldi’s it’s about ⅔ of that price.

1TubeGuru's avatar

Ok I just went to Aldi and today all grades of milk were only $1.99 per gallon.

Seek's avatar

Ermagherd, I’m moving in with @1TubeGuru

Half price milk! Woohoo!

dxs's avatar

Now I have to go back to that Aldi place. I thought it was weird when I went in there cause all it was was off-brand boxed things. But I guess I’ll give it another try.

Seek's avatar

^ This is true, but they are considerably higher quality than other discount grocery stores, like Save-A-Lot (eww..). The only thing I won’t do at Aldi is buy large amounts of fresh vegetables and fruits, except root veg, unless I’m going to use it right away.

But it’s really hard to argue with $1.49 for ten pounds of potatoes.

ibstubro's avatar

Like you eat enough to worry about the cost of food, @dxs

I agree, @Seek_Kolinahr that Aldi’s quality is equal/superior to about any store brand. Universally clean, bright, and well stocked, too. I like the fact that you have to take the cheap produce home and use it…it helps me set my menu.

Save-A-Lot must be somewhat universally yucky. Mine are.

LilCosmo's avatar

I just read this story about Aldi. There are a couple of them around here, between the story and this discussion, I am going to have to check it out!

It seems that, except for the sale at Aldi, milk around here is the cheapest in the Flutherverse! Considering my kids go through two full gallons a week that makes me happy.

downtide's avatar

I actually love Aldi’s, at least in the UK. It’s all off-brand stuff but they’re great for continental food. Swiss cheeses, German sausages, Italian pasta sauces (they have more variations of pesto than I have seen anywhere, even in specialist Italian delis) and their deals on wine are second to none.

dxs's avatar

Yeah they have a minuscule produce section which I find odd since basically everything else is nonperishable. And hah I remember Save A Lot. I didn’t even pick up on the lack of quality because I didn’t care. It was the least expensive (and it didn’t kill me @ibstubro) .
In Providence there was a really nice chain grocery store right near very close by called Price Rite. That was my favorite place to shop because it was the least expensive, especially for produce, which is always wicked pricey at other grocery stores. But now that I look back I remember seeing brown lettuce being sold there haha. It still doesn’t bother me, though.

dxs's avatar

Yes! Their block cheese was so inexpensive! I said “off-brand box things” because it all looked like cheap junk food. At least the first aisle…maybe I should reconsider.

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

I usually buy ½’s to make sure it’s fresh, they cost $2.39 for a half.

ibstubro's avatar

You need to re-visit, @dxs. Aldi’s produce section doesn’t rival many supermarkets in size, but the ‘Weekly Specials’ are usually dirt cheap and ready to eat. They have great prices on cheese, hummus, lunch meats and a big variety of other fridge foods.

glacial's avatar

What is a gallon?

Here, 2 litres of milk is around $4.25.

Seek's avatar

Two liters is a little more than half a gallon

ragingloli's avatar

Let me see…
About 3.78 Litres.

talljasperman's avatar

Mine seems to be the most expensive $6.50 for 4 liters or , one big jug , of 3.25% homogenized and pasteurised. I haven’t been shopping for a month or so… The town is Red Deer or Jasper National Park , both are in Alberta, Canada. I do know that Orange juice is $8.00 a Liter in The Convenience store Macs , in Jasper National Park because I was screamed at me when I was working night shifts there.

glacial's avatar

@talljasperman I just realized that almost no one is reporting what the % is of the milk they buy. Homogenized milk is the most expensive sold in stores (I think there are places in the US where they don’t even sell it – seems to me it’s more of a Canadian thing), so that would explain why yours is the most expensive listed here. My price was for 2%.

ragingloli's avatar

3.5%, about 2.40€ for 4 litres. That is about 3.27usd.

ibstubro's avatar

I don’t know of any place in the Ustates that doesn’t sell whole milk, @glacial. I quoted whole milk and the price difference here is usually not that significant. Skim to 1%, 2% and whole might be a 5 to 25 cent upgrade each per gallon. So probably no more than 75 cents a gallon in my area.

hug_of_war's avatar

Whole, skim, 1% and 2% all cost the same here.

dxs's avatar

Whole milk is more expensive here. Go figure.

Smitha's avatar

For us it comes around 20 dirham that is $5.45.

downtide's avatar

A US gallon is about 3.8 litres. A UK gallon is 4.5 litres. This is because a US pint is only 16oz whereas a UK pint is 20 oz.

LilCosmo's avatar

Everywhere I shop carries whole milk and all the different kinds cost the same.

Seek's avatar

@glacial

Every bottle of milk I’ve ever bought, ever, has had the words “Pasteurized, Homogenized” on the label, unless it was raw milk.

And there’s no difference in price between whole, 2%, 1% or Skim.

Raw milk needs to be purchased from reputable, licensed suppliers in my area, and is prohibitively expensive for me.

KNOWITALL's avatar

In Missouri our skim and 2% are a dime or so higher than homogenized.

glacial's avatar

@Seek_Kolinahr & @ibstubro Yes, I think this is the thing… I knew there was some difference between Canada and the US in terms of homogenized milk, but couldn’t remember what it was.

In Canada, all milk is technically “homogenized”, but we use the term “homogenized milk” (or increasingly rarely, “homo milk”) to refer specifically to what Americans call “whole milk”, i.e. 3.25% milk fat.

tom_g's avatar

@glacial – All milk (except rare specialty products) in the US is homogenized as well. So, 1%, 2%, and 3.25% (whole) is all homogenized.

Seek's avatar

@glacial – My husband refers to whole milk as “Vitamin D milk”. It bugs me more than it should, because all milk has added Vitamin D, again, unless it’s raw. I’ve always referred to 3.25% milk as “whole” or “full-fat”.

He grew up in southern Illinois, and I in New York City, so I don’t know if it’s a regional thing.

Seek's avatar

@downtide – That explains why our pints of beer look so damned tiny. I knew I was getting ripped off.

glacial's avatar

@Seek_Kolinahr This is one of those things that pops up in You know you’re a Canadian when… lists. I’ve never heard of an American using this term in this context.

@tom_g Yes, I acknowledged that. It is terminology we use, just the same. :P

dxs's avatar

I bought whole milk and sometimes all it would say on it is “Vitamin D Milk” and confused me so much. It took me a while to get used to that because I knew all milk had Vitamin D. I always looked on the nutrition label to make sure all of the nutrients in normal whole milk were there.
And wow my mind is blown because I never understood that the percent only goes up to 3.25. I thought Whole milk was 100% of whatever, so I was always so perplexed at how people cared so much about the tiny difference between 1% and 2% milk.

jca's avatar

It’s amazing how the tiny difference in fat content that @dxs talked about makes such a difference in the “mouth feel” and the color that it turns the coffee or whatever you put it into.

glacial's avatar

@dxs It depends how you look at it. If your milk was 100% fat, it would be disgusting, and nothing like actual milk. It would be a carton of fat.

“Whole milk” has 100% of the fat that milk can possibly have. Or something. I wonder if there’s a little more in raw milk.

Seek's avatar

Haha, @dxs In contrast, butter is about 80% milkfat.

ibstubro's avatar

But, @dxs is correct…“whole milk” is meant to approximate fresh milk that has had the cream largely (as if by hand) removed. When humans were agrarian they largely drank ‘whole’ milk and processed the cream into more stable and salable products.

Commercially available whipping cream (also pasteurized) can, in my experience, be made into butter at about a 50% ratio; or a quart of whipping cream will yield about a pound of butter.

glacial's avatar

@ibstubro Yeah, good point. I guess it depends on what our definition of “milk” is. Is milk exactly the liquid as it comes out of a cow? Or is it the liquid that we get by skimming that?

Buttonstc's avatar

@jca hit the nail on the head right here !

———————————————————-
“It’s amazing how the tiny difference in fat content that @dxs talked about makes such a difference in the “mouth feel” and the color that it turns the coffee or whatever you put it into.”
————————————————————

Whole milk is delicious and its what I always buy. However, if I run out and need to borrow from my housemate, I can tolerate the 2% since its better than nothing.

But I draw the line at 1%. I’d rather do without. That crap tastes awful and is little more than glorified water which tastes like rubber bands. Horrid horrid taste. Yuck. I’d rather drink water.

jca's avatar

Also, 1% or fat – free goes bad so fast.

tom_g's avatar

@jca: “Also, 1% or fat – free goes bad so fast”

Instantly. That stuff is nasty.

Seek's avatar

I actually rather enjoy skim milk, and would prefer to buy it. But my youngling takes in little enough calories as is, so I depend on whole milk to fatten him up.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Buttonstc Same with hubs. If I send him to the store he gets full fat, says it tastes so much better than 1%, so we generally compromise on 2%. He’s 140 soaking wet so he needs the calories, too.

katie129's avatar

I can get two gallons at Costco for about $4. So about two bucks a gallon in Idaho

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@katie129 Wow, that’s cheap. Are they using it as a loss leader? The farmgate price is about $1.45 a gallon.

JLeslie's avatar

@jca Fat free organic ultrapasteurized usually lasts a month and tastes richer than regular skim milk.

Katniss's avatar

Same as @Buttonstc, but I’m an hour west of Detroit.

momster's avatar

I buy organic whole milk and a half gallon is usually $3.79, give or take.

I don’t buy any other kind of milk because there are additives to make those taste better with the fat removed. Also organic whole milk has a healthier ratio of Omega 3 than nonorganic. It was an adjustment going to organic but once I realized there was no need to give my kids a tall glass of milk at every meal and really it’s better for them not to drink so much milk, the organic became affordable. Instead of two or three gallons a week, now we use maybe a gallon a week, maybe a little more if I am making cream of something soup or hot cocoa.

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