General Question

rowenaz's avatar

What does "apply educational research" mean?

Asked by rowenaz (2426 points ) June 28th, 2008

Next semester I am taking a course called “Practicum in Teaching” and it says in the course description that I will have to “apply education research to a specific school situation…” I understand that I will have to address a problem, but does this mean statistics? Does it mean I will have to interview or count or keep track of anything???

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4 Answers

xyzzy's avatar

Probably means you have to apply the latest research fad to a problem in the classroom. And yes, that involves stats since you will have to show success/failure with something a little more exact that “it seems to work”. It sounds like you’re afraid of statistics, math, and/or the rigors of scientific experimentation. Sorry to be blunt, but those aren’t good qualities in someone majoring in Education.

One final bit of advice, talk to the professor running the course. Find out what his office hours are and stop by. Spending 5 minutes with him will answer your question far better than anyone here.

rowenaz's avatar

No – it’s more like I only have 25 students – about five in each grade. I’m hoping I don’t have to go to a bunch of different schools just to collect students for a study. And not wanting to do research isn’t a “bad quality for someone majoring in Education” – no one will take any research seriously on such a small group of children.

marinelife's avatar

I would not have necessarily taken that phrase to mean statistical information. I took it to mean apply one or more of the educational research techniques you have learned about in classroom settings to an actual in-classroom environment and report the results.

janbb's avatar

As a reference librarian, I take it to mean that you will have to back up your intuitive findings in the classroom with research in current eductional theory, i.e., articles from educational databases (such as ERIC) and journals. This would include citing other case studies and statistics in your reports.

That’s just my take on it. I do agree with XYZZY (how do you pronounce that?) that talking to the professor or calling the department office if the professor is not available for the summer is the best way to figure it out.

Good Luck!

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