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augustlan's avatar

What would a chocolate chip cookie sans chocolate chips be called?

Asked by augustlan (46582 points ) March 27th, 2014

I really love the Tollhouse recipe chocolate chip cookies, but dislike the chocolate chips themselves. Even if I eat around them, I can still taste them. I realize this un-American and possibly blasphemy, as well.

I like the cookies either plain or with non-chocolate add-ins (recent favorite: chopped pecans and toffee bits). So what would I call just the cookie part?

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63 Answers

Buttonstc's avatar

Sugar cookies. Its a basic recipe.

Have you tried them with Butterscotch flavored chips? Nestles makes packages of them now. Same size as the chocolate ones.

augustlan's avatar

@Buttonstc Hm, they don’t seem the same as sugar cookies to me. Sugar cookies taste considerably sweeter to me, and the others seem crispier. Maybe it’s just that the sugar cookies I eat aren’t made with that particular recipe.

I’ve had butterscotch ones in the past, and recently made some with white ‘chocolate’ chips, but both seem overpowering to me.

@dappled_leaves Haha, I was hoping for something a little more specific. ;)

elbanditoroso's avatar

Neutered chocolate chip cookies.

dappled_leaves's avatar

I would call them “refrigerator cookies” or “icebox cookies”, based on my travels through my mom’s ancient cookbooks when I was a kid. The idea being that it’s a fairly plain cookie that you keep in the fridge until you have an occasion to bake.

When I google these terms now, I see images of fancier things. They’re pretty flexible; you can put anything in them. Like, say, chocolate chips.

GloPro's avatar

Hmmm, how about calling them a testament to how much others love you by giving them the opportunity to pick out the chips for you when they stop by. Then you can bake cookies together while they visit. Brilliant!
I don’t think the batter exists sans chips, but I agree they’re tasty.

Buttonstc's avatar

Well, the amount of sugar one puts in a recipe can vary.

Plus, most sugar cookies have actual sugar on top baked into them. At least the ones I’ve seen. The sugar granules are pressed in with the bottom of a glass, typically. So, presumably they taste more sugary.

kritiper's avatar

It would be a brown sugar cookie. But (sans chips), to the standard recipe, add ¼ tsp. cinnamon, 1/8 tsp. nutmeg and/or pumpkin pie spice, or ginger alone and you’ll have a spice cookie! The whole house will smell great!

gailcalled's avatar

Chocolate anti-chip cookies. I have always thought that the brown sugar helps to differentiate the Tollhouse cookie from the sugar cookie. Do you still like the chopped walnuts?

Buttonstc's avatar

I don’t think the batter exists sans chips, but I agree they’re tasty.
========================

That’s a little confusing to me. They would bake up just fine if you left out the chocolate chips or the nuts or whatever else. So, its not as if it COULDN’T exist. It all depends upon what one chooses to do with it.

Buttonstc's avatar

@gailcalled

You’re right. I forgot about the brown sugar.

So, now that we’ve established that they could be baked sans chips, all we have to do is decide what to call them :)

augustlan's avatar

@gailcalled Yes, and it’s a combo of brown and white sugar in the chipless cookies.
@GloPro When you make them from scratch, it’s easy to add or remove any of the additions. My daughters made me some plain ones recently, and I did feel extra loved. :)

GloPro's avatar

Ah, I thought we were daydreaming about Tollhouse specifically. I didn’t realize we were getting all crazy from scratch.

augustlan's avatar

@GloPro Oh, we are! The recipe to make them from scratch is on the back of the chocolate chips bag.

kritiper's avatar

I see now that not all chocolate chip cookies have brown sugar. So they’d be a semi-sweet sugar cookie. ? Maybe??

GloPro's avatar

Why would you buy a bag of chocolate chips if you don’t like them in your cookies, @augustlan?

gailcalled's avatar

I’ve seen M & M’s in Tollhouse cookies, but have always felt that was blasphemous.

augustlan's avatar

@GloPro I don’t, when making them for myself. I looked up the recipe online for that. But I’ve made them for other people, too, and they seem to think a chocolate chip cookie should contain chocolate chips. Imagine that! Haha.

Judi's avatar

I would call it a brown sugar cookie.

GloPro's avatar

Haha, okay, I’m back on the right track. Any cookie you put in front of me will be fine, thank you. I even eat mistake cookies, so feel free to experiment.

filmfann's avatar

Toll Free?
I rarely get past the batter stage. I can snack on that for days.

and now I am diabetic

augustlan's avatar

@Judi That makes good sense.

That is a winner, @filmfann. No matter what they might really be called, they will henceforth be known as Toll Free Cookies in my house!

Mimishu1995's avatar

Sorry for not having any answer for you @augustlan, but just drop in to say I’m glad you’ve finally arrived ;)

augustlan's avatar

@dappled_leaves Refrigerator cookies look good and handy. @kritiper I do love a good spice cookie. I’ll have to try that! @Mimishu1995 Thanks!

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

Before @filmfann won the naming contest, I was going to suggest you call them George.

El_Cadejo's avatar

Next time you make chocolate chip cookies replace the chocolate chips with precooked bacon. You’ll thank me later.

The first one will be give a reaction of “hmmm this is…very….odd…” and then in 5 minutes time you’ll realize the whole batch has been devoured :P

I do agree though, chocolate chip cookies sans chocolate chips definitely taste different than sugar cookies and I too prefer not having the chocolate chips in there.

augustlan's avatar

I always knew we were kindred spirits, @uber @El_Cadejo! I will definitely try the bacon.

rojo's avatar

a MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM cookie.

or just a cookie as @dappled_leaves said

Jonesn4burgers's avatar

Call them, chocolate chip surprise cookies! The surprise, no chips

hominid's avatar

I always use less than half the amount of chocolate chips the recipe calls for, and replace that amount (and some) with walnuts. Maybe you could just go all walnuts?

gailcalled's avatar

The cookie junta that has just formed and has been secretly meeting in basement kitchens wants to overthrow Toll Free and install Chocolate Chipless.

wildpotato's avatar

I’m surprised no one knows this so far. These are called butter cookies. Most people use them as cutout-cookies and also put icing or other additions on top, but I like em plain.

cookieman's avatar

I call them my wife’s favorite cookie !!

All this time, never heard anyone else who like CCC without the chocolate chips.

I will forward her this thread.

Stinley's avatar

I don’t understand the question! What is Tollhouse?

ragingloli's avatar

Tollhaus is an old german derogatory term for an insane asylum.

gailcalled's avatar

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_chip_cookie

It was an inn.

“The chocolate chip cookie was invented by Ruth Graves Wakefield. She owned the Toll House Inn, in Whitman, Massachusetts, a very popular restaurant that featured home cooking in the 1930s. Her cookbook, Toll House Tried and True Recipes, was first published in 1936 by M. Barrows & Company, New York. The 1938 edition of the cookbook was the first to include the recipe “Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie” which rapidly became a favorite cookie in American homes.”

Stinley's avatar

I think I need a thinking cap today… @augustlan is asking what you call a cookie made to the Tollhouse chocolate chip cookie recipe but without the choc chips?

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@augustlan Now you’ve done it. I’m thinking of trying a bittersweet chocolate chip cookie. I’ll have to do some digging to find bittersweet chocolate but I have seen it before. That sounds really interesting.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@Adirondackwannabe—Here you go bittersweet chips I have a bag in my pantry from a visit to to a specialty cooking store.

Adirondackwannabe's avatar

@Tropical_Willie Not exactly bargain priced but they do make some excellent chocolate.

JLeslie's avatar

If you use the Toll House recipe, I would call them Toll House sans cc bits. Or, chocolate chip cookies without cc bits.

It definitely is not a sugar cookie, unless you want to call it a brown sugar cookie as someone suggested above. Brown sugar cookie I think is probably the closest to being an accurate description of the cookie.

The chocolate chip cookies is one of the most popular cookies in America. Almost everyone is familiar with the taste and look of the cookie, so I think it is hard to call it something totally different.

My mom would probably call it a virgin cookie, since she is a chocoholic.

wildpotato's avatar

My professional baker fiance corrected me and says they’re really called butter drop cookies. He also adds that chocolate chip cookies are technically chocolate chip drop cookies. So there we go.

JLeslie's avatar

True, they are drop cookies. I would assume if someone is using the Toll House recipe they should technically be called Toll House cookies, not just a cc drop cookie. My mom says cc bit, I guess that should be cc morsels?

janbb's avatar

In another take on this, my BIL used to make toll house cookies with nuts and ones without nuts for my sons. He called the ones without nuts “Prince cookies” after my dog who was neutered!

dappled_leaves's avatar

@wildpotato You and I are presenting different classifications here – I said “refrigerator” and you say “drop”. This is partly because I tend to refrigerate my chocolate chip cookies to bake later, but mainly because the old cookbooks always seem to present refrigerator cookie recipes that are, ingredient-wise, very similar to chocolate chip cookies without the chips. Drop cookies can be pretty much anything, as long as they’re dropped from a spoon to the tray.

But I agree that almost everyone makes chocolate chip cookies as drop cookies. I’m not sure I agree with your suggestion of butter cookies, though. That makes me think immediately of shortbreads or other cookies made primarily with granular or confectioner’s sugar. But maybe you’re right.

JLeslie's avatar

Chocolate chip cookies are not butter cookies in my opinion.

janbb's avatar

I think of butter cookies as very different as well. Usually rolled or cut out rather than dropped, not made with brown sugar and more buttery.

janbb's avatar

How about calling them “Auggie’s House Cookies”?

Judi's avatar

You guys are making me want to go make some of Nana’s shortbread cookies, or maybe even some millionaire shortbread. STOP!

dappled_leaves's avatar

Also, who makes shortbread with sardines??

gailcalled's avatar

MIlo here; I do, then throw out the shortbread.

gailcalled's avatar

Not six days ago, Slate magazine published a disquisition on the original Toll House cookie recipe, almost pedantic enough for a Master’s thesis. Read it here

JLeslie's avatar

@gailcalled Hold on now, that is actually different than the Nestlé recipe. I thought the Nestlé recipe was the original recipe.

gailcalled's avatar

It is slightly different, as the author discusses.

JLeslie's avatar

I’m curious to try the original recipe.

Symbeline's avatar

I call it a sin.

jca's avatar

It’s not a sugar cookie. The cookie part of chocolate chip cookies is more flavorful than a plain old sugar cookie because of the added brown sugar. If you constructed a chocolate chip cookie from a sugar cookie recipe and just put chocolate chips into it, it would definitely not taste like a proper chocolate chip cookie. It would taste like a bland sugar cookie with chocolate chips thrown in.

I had a really good oatmeal cookie once, with pecans and butterscotch chips. Oh, I’m sorry. I digress.

Now I am thinking about the chipless cookies of the chocolate chip type but instead of chocolate chips, perhaps nuts and butterscotch morsels.

How about rum soaked raisins in some type of cookies? I am on a tangent now. I haven’t had breakfast yet.

gailcalled's avatar

We add two T. water to our recipe**, use a rather large blob of dough, drop it on the cookie sheet and splat it down with the palm of our hand. It makes a big, crisp ccc.

** Slightly different proportions to the one on the Nestle package.

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