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Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

What does a question that the guidelines says ”promotes good discourse” look like to you?

Asked by Hypocrisy_Central (21504 points ) April 28th, 2014

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13 Answers

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

A great question has plenty of details to work with.

johnpowell's avatar

One where the conclusion isn’t already reached by the person asking. Questions where you are just looking for people to agree with you generally suck.

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

@johnpowell Such questions don’t just suck. They’re fucked up.

ucme's avatar

On here, a needle in a haystack

DaphneT's avatar

It would be grammatically correct, using phrases like “How do I avoid” rather than “How to avoid”. Two or three details may make it more comprehensible, however there are some rare questions that don’t need details. A detail, in my opinion, is a full, grammatically correct sentence that provides background or context for the question. The detail may also clarify how the question might be answered, such as specifying that links to other sites would be useful or not. It may also clarify that basic searches have been conducted and help is desired in sorting through the gobbledygook.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Seek has a talent for positing questions that generate spirited and long lasting discussions. Must be some sort of gift. Too bad, it can’t be readily monetized!

Symbeline's avatar

Questions that cause intelligent, or fun, or both, discussion and where you can learn shit. And what @johnpowell said. We are on a Q&A site, no blog entries.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@Hawaii_Jake A great question has plenty of details to work with.
A question that is so nebulous that the viewer can literally make the question anything they chose it to say, or a question that has no real answer so just about anything a person wants to make the answer goes? What and where are these details found, and what are they?

@DaphneT It would be grammatically correct, using phrases like “How do I avoid” rather than “How to avoid”.
Not trying to be presumptuous, but are you saying a question where all the Ts are crossed and every I dotted thought the content of the question be as mentally simulating as watching a feather blow around the corner of a room, trumps a question of brain stimulating substance where the grammar was slightly off but the context of the question is understood?

The detail may also clarify how the question might be answered, such as specifying that links to other sites would be useful or not.
How would you do that and avoid people accusing you of steering the question or any bias for or against the question?

@Symbeline Questions that cause intelligent, or fun, or both, discussion and where you can learn shit
How is that done if people refuse to even look at the question off face value, you can’t learn from a question that much can be learned from if you are attacking the question or the poster.

Symbeline's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central I never said it was always done. People talk about how one should not ask a question disguised as an opinion or make questions just so that people can agree with the OP and all. And they’re right. But it goes the other way around, as well. People shouldn’t make up their minds on an answer based on who is asking it or what the subject is. Not before actually checking out the question.
But you asked about questions and not answers, so I stuck to that. But it’s everyone’s job on here to create desirable discourse.
Unfortunately no, it doesn’t always happen on here, from both ends.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@Symbeline OK, fair enough.

People talk about how one should not ask a question disguised as an opinion or make questions just so that people can agree with the OP and all. And they’re right.
IYO is a question asking someone what nickname a state, government, candidate, etc. should be called because they favored a law that some felt attack the group or status they belong to is a leading question or an opinion disguised as a question? Would it have to include terminology that has little doubt the OP is oppose to it, or not?

Symbeline's avatar

If I understand what you’re saying, the example is asking others what they think of your opinion. I think that’s totally valid. How well received that would be, I don’t know, but it’s a valid question. at least in social

But erm, what’s YO? Are you some kinda gangbanger now? XD

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@Symbeline If I understand what you’re saying, the example is asking others what they think of your opinion.
Not that per se, for instance, let’s say this is mostly union. A particular company, state government, etc. passes a bill that is unfavorable to unions. Then someone post a question as to what to call these greedy people who wants to stick it to the little guy. By way they word the question and because it is constructed to be against Big Business, or the Man, etc. even if it is their opinion, the question is not leading, or is it? By the way, you can supplant union with any other sacred cow.

Symbeline's avatar

Hm, had to read that several times to understand where you were getting at. Ha but I don’t know. There’s two ways I see it…one, it is an opinion question, as its idea doesn’t even question the alignment; you’re asking for what can we call these big bastards. If I did that, I would put it as a joke or fluff question, which is acceptable in my eyes. However it already comes with a set opinion, and that will inevitably be brought up and challenged, at least on Fluther. At said point, I would suggest just making a mature question about what everyone thinks. There is nothing wrong in stating your own opinion in a question, but there has to be a legit question in there somewhere.

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