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LuckyGuy's avatar

Age Test. Do you remember the Tishman Twins, Gerald and ?

Asked by LuckyGuy (29612 points ) June 21st, 2014

And what was the singer’s job?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

34 Answers

Symbeline's avatar

Don’t know who those dudes are. I decided to look them up, but only after answering this. Now, to go see…

LuckyGuy's avatar

Shhh…Don’t say out loud.

A few folks will get it. All will be well over 50.

Symbeline's avatar

I won’t say. I can’t actually find very much, either.;/

dappled_leaves's avatar

Never heard of them.

snowberry's avatar

Edit: I wasn’t supposed to tell, so let me just say, YES! LOL

zenvelo's avatar

Nope. Never ever heard that song.

LuckyGuy's avatar

That’s it. @snowberry Did you know it or did you have to look it up?

janbb's avatar

@LuckyGuy You obviously think I’m very old. :-) But no, I haven’t heard of them.

LuckyGuy's avatar

It was from our neighborhood. Didn’t you listen to A.S. songs as a kid? My parents loved him.

janbb's avatar

Allan Sherman?

snowberry's avatar

Had to look it up, but I need to look up anything regarding music and stuff like that.

Mimishu1995's avatar

Not another culture test!

No.

gailcalled's avatar

I remember “Here am I at Camp Granada” but not the twins per se.

My mother also loved him and played the LP record over and over.

gailcalled's avatar

^^^ It helps to be American, white, old, from the New York or Boston area and probably Jewish. (Spoiler: Allan Sherman)

LuckyGuy's avatar

Hello Muddah.
Helllo Faddah.
Here I am at,
Camp Granada!

^ That is a pretty tight demographic. I figured his popularity never spread beyond the Catskills. He probably didn’t play many shows in Topeka. But who knows?

gailcalled's avatar

A safe assumption initially but don’t forget his other coverage after the record went viral.

“At the height of his popularity in 1965, Sherman published an autobiography, A Gift of Laughter, and, for a short period at least, Sherman was culturally ubiquitous. He sang on and guest-hosted The Tonight Show, was involved in the production of Bill Cosby’s first three albums, appeared in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and sang “The Dropouts’ March” on the March 6, 1964, edition of…That Was The Week That Was.

Also in 1964, Sherman narrated his own version of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf in a live concert at Tanglewood with the Boston Pops under Arthur Fiedler. The concert, which was released as the album Peter and the Commissar, also included “Variations on ‘How Dry I Am,’” with Sherman as conductor, and “The End of a Symphony.” In “Variations,” ***Fiedler was the guest soloist, providing solo hiccups*. In 2004, Collector’s Choice reissued the complete RCA Victor album on CD.” Source

dappled_leaves's avatar

@LuckyGuy I’m sure a lot more people (and of varied ages) have heard the Grenada song than your Tishman twins song.

gailcalled's avatar

(Tishman twins were just two among the huge population at Camp Granada.)

dappled_leaves's avatar

My understanding is that the Tishman twins are from Shake Hands With Your Uncle Max, not from Camp Granada. Are they in both?

LuckyGuy's avatar

“And you remember the Tishman Twins, Gerald and Jerome, We all came out to greet you and to wish you welcome home! ”
Shake hands with your Uncle Max.

To be fair, everyone from the Island is, knows, or is related to a Tishman and a Sol Cohen . (You can skip the first minute if you are in a hurry.)

Symbeline's avatar

@LuckyGuy Dude! I totally know that camp Granada song. Heard it when I was little, and while I only remmeber the one quoted part, it always stayed in my head for some reason. But until now, I always thought it was camp ’‘Renada’’ haha.

dappled_leaves's avatar

A sign that people are expected to recognize Camp Granada. :)

Symbeline's avatar

LOL I remember that. Maybe that’s why the song has been copnserved in my head. Camp ’‘Renada’’ and all.

LuckyGuy's avatar

We all learned something today!

Did you listen to “Shake hands with your uncle max”?

gailcalled's avatar

I got it wrong; the Tishman twins were not at camp Grenada (which I also misspelled as “Granada.”)

Sorry.

I remember them all.

I am about to send “Hello, Muddah, Hello, Faddah,” to my sister who was sent to sleep-away camp young and hated it. (I and our brother loved it).

Symbeline's avatar

…sleepaway camp? Too much horror business for me I think…:D

gailcalled's avatar

^^ KIds wetting their beds and poison ivy were the horrors she remembers.

Symbeline's avatar

Better than dudes in masks going apeshit all over the place am I right? XD

gailcalled's avatar

^^ You are. Nice Jewish sleep-away camps in the late 50’s didn’t allow dudes in masks on their camp grounds. They got sent to the Girl Scout camps across the lake.

LuckyGuy's avatar

Oy, how I remember sleep away camp. My brother and I went to Camp Wel-Met somewhere “Upstate”. Now that I’m older, and maybe wiser, I realize it was chance for my parents to enjoy a little peace and quiet – and who knows what else.

gailcalled's avatar

^^ Not a chance for you to learn how to build a campfire, paddle a war canoe, dive off a board, master jr. life saving, braid a lanyard for your mom, and climb some dumb mountain with a bologna sandwich, a pb and j sandwich, an orange and a Hershey bar with warm water in a metal canteen?

Billy Collins, former national Poet Laureate, The Lanyard

Verse two:

“No cookie nibbled by a French novelist
could send one into the past more suddenly—
a past where I sat at a workbench at a camp
by a deep Adirondack lake
learning how to braid long thin plastic strips
into a lanyard, a gift for my mother.”

LuckyGuy's avatar

^ Now that you mention it, I did learn a few things: the J stroke in a canoe, boondoggle with its box stitch and braid that made a lanyard – or a noose, how far I could swim when there was a goal at the end (25 laps meant you could canoe.), singing songs around the campfire. “If I had a hammer”, cooking toast with tomato and eggs on the fire.
I also learned a few tricks that I was able to try upon returning home. how to make a match rocket, and how to make peach pit rings.

Still, I like the idea of it being a chance for our parents to enjoy the privacy and reconnect.

ibstubro's avatar

I always thought that song was from a musical. It certainly sounds like it.

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