General Question

phoenyx's avatar

I've taken a lot of showers, but have never put one back.

Asked by phoenyx (7356 points ) March 15th, 2009

When I rejoice does that mean I’m joicing again? I’ve been overthinking English oddities again. Feel free to add your own.

(I can’t find the word “overthinking” in the dictionary).

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25 Answers

Elumas's avatar

I realized recently that it’s odd that have and gave do not rhyme.

KatawaGrey's avatar

“If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?” I read that once somewhere and I can;t for the life of me remember where.

ubersiren's avatar

We got a regular George Carlin, here!

Bolt can mean to fasten into place, or to leave quickly. One word with 2 definitions that are opposites of each other. Google autoantonyms. I saw it on Jeopardy.

KatawaGrey's avatar

@ubersiren: My mom and I are trying to find all of them in the english language. We’ve made a game out of it. :)

ubersiren's avatar

@KatawaGrey : Whoa, that’s crazy talk!

phoenyx's avatar

I’ve been making a list of contranyms/autoantonyms/enantiodromes too!

aprilsimnel's avatar

Nothing rhymes with orange.

Nothing.

Jamspoon's avatar

Over thinking, under thinking – just a matter of perspective.

“shore-hinge” rhymes with orange.

evelyns_pet_zebra's avatar

if olive oil is made out of olives, what is baby oil made out of?

Bluefreedom's avatar

Why do we park on driveways and drive on parkways?

mrswho's avatar

Would gruntled be the opposite disgruntled? (I saw that on The Office once)

Darwin's avatar

@aprilsimnel – No, it doesn’t. Nothing doesn’t rhyme with orange. Nothing doesn’t rhyme with silver either.

phoenyx's avatar

Blorenge rhymes with orange.

Darwin's avatar

@Mrs_Who – P.G. Wodehouse gave rise to that meaning of the word in 1926. Before then it meant to grumble, or if you prefer:

“The first sense of gruntle was of a repeated grunt, especially the noise that pigs make in company. An example is in The Life and Death of Mr Badman, by John Bunyan, of 1680: “After this his speech went quite away, and he could speak no more than a Swine or a Bear. Therefore, like one of them, he would gruntle and make an ugly noise, according as he was offended, or pleased, or would have any thing done.” It is rarely used of humans, but an example occurs in a 1922 book, The Covered Wagon, by Emerson Hough, “They dismounted. The two Indians, short, deep-chested, bow-legged men, went to the packs. They gruntled as they unloaded the two larger mules.” Gruntle appeared in the fifteenth century; by the end of the next century it had begun to be used to mean grumbling or complaining. I imagine it as old-retainer mumble, the noise that someone fed up with their condition will make under their breath all the time.”
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-dis1.htm

Darwin's avatar

Blorenge does indeed rhyme with orange, but nothing doesn’t.

However, one could argue that Blorenge is not English in that it is located in Wales.

mrswho's avatar

@Darwin YAY! Thank you! I never knew that.

Dr_C's avatar

ok… i’ve always wondered… if you can be overwhelmed and underwhelmed… can you ever just be whelmed?

Darwin's avatar

@Dr_C – Yes, you can, in two senses.

“whelm (hwlm, wlm)
tr.v. whelmed, whelm·ing, whelms
1. To cover with water; submerge.
2. To overwhelm.
[Middle English whelmen, to overturn, probably alteration (influenced by helmen, to cover) of whelven, from Old English -hwelfan (as in hwelfan, to cover over).]:”
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/whelmed

kwhull's avatar

Why is it called a “building” even after it is finished? Shouldn’t it then be called a “built”?

adreamofautumn's avatar

@Dr_C you wrote exactly what I was going to write in this thread! I find myself considering that one frequently.

evelyns_pet_zebra's avatar

There is no word that rhymes with orange, especially the way my wife says it. The closest rhyme would be ‘oh-tinge’.

evelyns_pet_zebra's avatar

@aprilsimnel so that begs the question, do you squeeze the oil out of Girl Scouts, or squeegee it off, and are there different types, as there is in olive oil, as in virgin, extra virgin… uh, never mind, that might suddenly turn into an inappropriate direction to take this particular subject.

I’ll just take your word for it. :-)

asmonet's avatar

Have you ever peed in the shower or outside? You put one back.

Byelsse's avatar

Lol (: Sorry don’t have any

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