General Question

sakura's avatar

What does a closed cervix mean?

Asked by sakura (8225 points ) July 1st, 2009

I went for a smear whilst in NZ and the doctor did an internal exam, she said, ohh you have a closed cervix, I asked her whether or not this would cause any problems and she didn’t seem unduly worried. However I did the foolish thing of looking it up on the internet and from the information I found it says this would only happen if I had, had surgery for warts (something I’ve not had) and that it is something I shouldn’t be concerned about especially if I am not preganant. Please help should I go back and see a doctor??

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10 Answers

bea2345's avatar

It does not seem to mean anything. Your cervix tends to remain closed when you are not menstruating and during pregnancy. That does not mean that you cannot become pregnant when it is closed. On the contrary. There is not a lot of information and the little I saw suggests that a closed cervix is not a problem for most women.

casheroo's avatar

Your cervix is closed when you are not ovulating or menstruating, so I don’t see what the issue is.

sakura's avatar

The doctor made out like this isn’t normal with the tone of her voice so it got me thinking great if its normal, just that I had read somewhere on the internet
A closed cervix or stenotic cervix, may result from trauma or scar tissue from surgical procedures such as a leep procedure attempting to treat the condyloma virus (HPV). This condition can result from trauma to the cervical tissue, possibley from surgical procedures performed while attempting to treat cervical dysplasia. Some of these surguries include a cone biopsy, lazer surgery, or a leep procedure. A closed cervix or stenotic cervix, may result from trauma or scar tissue from surgical procedures such as a leep procedure attempting to treat the condyloma virus (HPV).

Some problems that result from having the scar tissue on the cervical area are that the tissue does not stretch and dialate. Complications that will interfere with pregnancy and delivery. A closed cervix or stenotic cervix, may result from trauma or scar tissue from surgical procedures such as a leep procedure attempting to treat the condyloma virus (HPV

And it all sounded a bit worrying :( I don’t want to appear all hypocondriac and all that but just wondered what peoples thoughts knowledge is on the subject because what I researched seemed a bit up in the air.

casheroo's avatar

If you are concerned, call the doctor back and ask about it.

Frankie's avatar

I’m pretty sure this is normal, especially for a girl who has not had a baby (I’m assuming you haven’t). When I had my abortion several years ago, the physician had a hard time opening my cervix as it was both tiny and closed, and he ended up making a small scratch (nothing serious, it didn’t cause any problems). In other words, don’t worry about it, it seems quite normal, especially since your doctor didn’t seem too concerned. If you are worried, follow @casheroo ‘s advice and call the doctor back.

ubersiren's avatar

I agree with everyone above about it being normal. In fact, a friend of mine who recently gave birth had something called incompetent cervix which is essentially the opposite condition. It wouldn’t stay closed, and she actually lost her first baby because the cervix just couldn’t support the fetus’ weight. So this time they had to stitch it shut until the fetus was at term. She was on bed-rest most of the pregnancy.

Darwin's avatar

When I was in college I ran into a gynecologist who was quite perturbed that I had a “tipped uterus.” She had me convinced that I could never get pregnant ever. She was wrong.

I suggest you ask your doctor what she meant by a “closed cervix.” As others have said, it can very well be perfectly normal depending on what stage of your monthly cycle you are at, or whether you are pregnant.

sakura's avatar

thanks guys you have set my mind at ease a bit @Frankie I am 31 with a 10 year old child! I will menion it next time I go to the doctors :)

MagsRags's avatar

A stenotic cervix is a bit more commonly seen in women who have had procedures like the ones mentioned above, but sometimes it just happens. It’s also pretty common in menopausal women because of the lower hormone levels. Sometimes it’s harder for the person doing a pap to get a decent sample of cells from the cervical canal, and inserting an IUD would be more challenging, but other than that, it’s not likely to be an issue.

sakura's avatar

Thanks @MagsRags that answers my question :)

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