General Question

eLenaLicious's avatar

What are some physical traits of a Hispanic person?

Asked by eLenaLicious (822 points ) March 4th, 2010

Please do not act smart and say, “eyes, ears, nose…”
blah, blah, blah…
I would just like to know a few typical features of a Hispanic male/female, such as eye color, hair color, height, skin color, accent, facial structure…
I know each person is different, but let’s just say what are some key features of a Hispanic person; like what do you spot on someone that tells you they have Hispanic blood in them? (And I am also aware that Hispanic is too broad: Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, etc.)

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56 Answers

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

Most commonly, I associate Hispanic features with extremely dark hair and very tan skin. Obviously, this is not universal.

dpworkin's avatar

They try to take our jobs, they won’t speak English, they eat strange food with unpronounceable names filled with excruciatingly hot peppers, their music sounds all alike, they are taking over our lovely American automatic telephony with Spanish words, they slaughter roosters in our parks, they carry razor blades in their socks, they use too much Brylcreme™. Did I mention their music all sounds the same?

Jude's avatar

Dark hair and eyes (usually). And, a weakness (of mine). The ladies, that is.

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

Is this another… LET FLUTHER DO MY HOMEWORK QUESTION???

dpworkin's avatar

Too late, I gave up all the answers.

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

Yet another undeserved A+ granted to the American youth… I think American

augustlan's avatar

@dpworkin You might want to make it clear that you’re being sarcastic… your quip was flagged as offensive.

Dr_C's avatar

Depends on whether or not you choose to go with a stereotype. I’m hispanic, 6’8’, dark hair but light skin, no accent to speak of, and have been confused for a myriad of nationalities, not one of them hispanic.

dpworkin's avatar

@augustlan did you or any of the rest of the staff have any doubts? I can’t be responsible for the humor-impaired, except to wish them well, and continue to look for a cure.

TheLoneMonk's avatar

A low rider attached below the hips.

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

@dpworkin OH! that was a joke?…..........................oh

tinyfaery's avatar

I am Latina and have lived around Latinos my whole life. So, let’s see. Some have dark hair, except for the blondes. Some have dark eyes, except for those that have blue or green eyes. Some are dark, except for the ones with light skin. Some are short, except for those who are tall. Hmm…what else?

dpworkin's avatar

@tinyfaery My personal prejudice is that in a personal way most of them are warm and open people. I know that’s somewhat of a stereotype, but when I lived in California as an unhappy, alienated young man, the one place I felt at home and was always welcomed was in the Barrio. As for the physical stuff, you’ve got it right, although for me, there are few features more beautiful than those of the classic Aztec.

augustlan's avatar

Seriously, there really aren’t any physical traits that apply to all people of any group. What is it that you’re looking for, exactly?

josie's avatar

The classic term is associated with Spain (Hispania). Modern definition refers to countries once dominated by Spain -Mexico, Central and South America, the Antilles. Since the peoples in this area are descended from a race that originated in what is now Mongolia, they tend to have tan skin, dark eyes that are not quite round, and straight black hair-similar to other Asians. If memory serves me, they have a different blood type than other Asians. So depending on your time frame and context, Hispanics are either Iberian Caucasoids, or Asian style “Indians”.

Grisaille's avatar

I am mixed and have lived around Latinos my whole life. So, let’s see. Some have dark hair, except for the blondes. Some have dark eyes, except for those that have blue or green eyes. Some are dark, except for the ones with light skin. Some are short, except for those who are tall. Hmm… what else?

Skaggfacemutt's avatar

Wow, are we talking about illegal immigrants or people of Spanish blood? My husband was half Mexican and half Native American. His Mexican side lived in New Mexico for thousands of years – probably longer than Doworkin’s family has been here, His Native American side was from Colorado, for probably about as long. Your description of a Hispanic man is very offensive for Americans of Hispanic blood. Anyways, back to the “real” question. Hispanic men are usually relatively short. My husband was tall for his race at 5’7”. Almost always have dark skin, dark straight hair, brown eyes (except for the ones that don’t.) He was dang good-looking! He passed away five years ago, in case you’re wondering what happened to him. Even though his sisters are very light-skinned, I could still tell. I don’t know what it is, but I can tell a white brunette from a light-skinned Hispanic immediately.The shape of the eyes? The yellowish (instead of pinkish) hue of the skin, the deep, chocolate-brown eye color. Rick’s family is a perfect example of a mix between an Aztec Indian and a Spanish Conquistador. His brother looks white – freckles and all. He has some red-headed, green-eyed cousins. But the rest of them are very recognizably Hispanic.

Grisaille's avatar

The Quip

———————
Your head

JLeslie's avatar

Latin America, just like all of the Americas has many many immigrants, so Hispanics come in all shapes, sizes, skin color, hair color, etc. Some countries do have more Germans, or more Italians, etc, like different areas of the US. It is like asking what does an American look like?

Some Americans probably think of Mexican immigrants as a stereotypical Hispanic person. Many may have more Native American/Indigenous/Indian backgrounds, so they tend to have slightly darker skin than a causasian, dark hair, more time straight than curly, and dark eyes. Although, even the different Indians have very varied characteristics. But, this is a very narrow, I would say incorrect view of Latin America.

My husband is Mexican, he looks very mediteranian, could easily pass for Greek. He is half Israeli, quarter Spanish, quarter French, second generation born in Mexico, and grew up there, except for 2 years of high school. He is 5’10” his skin is not very dark at all, but darker than my pale skin, unless he goes into the sun, and then he is kissed all over by it in a beautiful suntan that makes me jealous. He has wavy/curly black hair (I hate him for that too, it is awful when you are married to a man that has better hair than you do) and amber brown eyes. His sister looks like Eva Langoria, I am not kidding.

I have a cousin by marriage from Cuba who is Jewish and part of his family had immigrated from England to Cuba, and then to America. He is as white and pale as any sterotypical Englishman you would want to think up, and blond.

A close Venezuelan friend of mine is Italian, and how he looks probably does not fit into the American sterotypical Italian assumptions either.

As for the term Hispanic, I don’t really like the term personally, but I think of it as describing Latin Americans from Spanish speaking countries, I prefer the term Latin American. People from Spain I would call Spanish.

tinyfaery's avatar

@JLeslie I usually get everything, but Mexican—Persian, Armenian, Italian, French, Jewish, Portugese…

JLeslie's avatar

@yeah, it really is almost impossible to say all Mexicans look a certain way. Some native Americans (I’ll use that for everyone thought to be native to the Americas look sort of Asian, like many Eskimos, which makes sense, since Alaska is so close to Asia. It’s all a mish mosh as the world gets smaller, and I am glad. I love the diversity, and I love not being able to guess where people are from by some stereotype. It’s more interesting that way. I used to get Irish and Italian all of the time. Jewish by other Jews and people who live around Jews. I did have someone guess Latvian once, which is correct actually, Latvian Jew. I think I look pretty typical for my ethnicity and definintely have some of the speech mannerisms associated with being an American Jew from Eastern Europe.

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

@tinyfaery @Grisaille

Which is the more correct designation, Hispanic, or Latino?

Dr_C's avatar

I use Hispanic considering I am of Spanish descent. But both have become commonly used to describe a wider range of origins.

eLenaLicious's avatar

@RealEyesRealizeRealLies haha no this isn’t for homework.
And yes, I am American :P
If you guys up there actually include Hawai’i as a state

eLenaLicious's avatar

And I am of Filipino, Italian and Hispanic blood although I am not sure what kind though…
Most likely Mexican or Puerto Rican….

john65pennington's avatar

No offense meant, but the key to me is when they say, “no speaka da English”. i have heard this so many times. they have a drivers license, but, “no reada the signs”.

MRSHINYSHOES's avatar

The same traits as anyone else——eyes, nose, hair, feet, legs, arms, etc. Smart ones, dumb ones, beautiful ones, not so beautiful ones, etc. We are all humans with the same human traits. The differences take the boredom out of this sameness.

JLeslie's avatar

@john65pennington Why do you think they can’t read signs? It is still a familiar alphabet, it is not Chinese. Street and city names don’t need to be in Spanish, somehow we understand Las Angeles is a city, even though it is in Spanish. When they take their test they have to understand our signage even if the test is primarily written in Spanish. That is why things like dangerous curves use a picture of an upcoming curve, and not only the words, Yield signs are a yellow triangle, stop signs are red in a hexagon shwpe. People all over Europe drive in countries where their language is not represented on the roads.

Response moderated
Dr_C's avatar

@john65pennington “no speaka da english” seems more like an english speaker trying to fool someone into believing they are not. First off the word “speak” does not exist in spanish so it would more likely be something along the lines of “No hablo ingles”. Same with “reada” it would be more along the lines of “No puedo leer los letreros” or “No puedo leer los señalamientos”. But then knowing that would entail at least a perfunctory knowledge of the language.

I can imagine a spanish speaker saying those things in the spirit of “let’s see if this gringo will fall for it”, but it’s unlikely. Also, it was mentioned before in the thread, but do you really think it’s likely that someone that can get through a DMV test (that even some native speakers don’t pass) doesn’t speak the language?

The whole “no speaka” and “no reada” is actually a very common practice among american tourists in foreign countries. Pretty lame if you ask me.

BTW… that kind of comment (even if it is preceded by “no offense”) is pretty damned offensive. The fact that you say “no offense” doesn’t mean people won’t take exception to it. As a person of Hispanic descent I find such phrases in poor taste.

Response moderated
Dr_C's avatar

@Grisaillesniff… my hero!

Jude's avatar

@Grisaille Good for you!

john65pennington's avatar

Gisalille, sorry you did not like my answer. all your profanity in the world is not going to change some of the hispanic people that drive, that do not have a drivers license, cannot read or speak English or pay taxes. I am talking about the illegals.

Grisaille's avatar

That’s the point. No one here was . Which is why it is so easy to snipe you out as prejudice.

MRSHINYSHOES's avatar

If eLena is asking about the differences in physical traits that set Hispanics apart from other groups, then I would say the darker olive complexion, dark eyes, dark hair, and generally stockier physiques——traits that I love——because they remind me of the group I belong to——East Asians. Many Hispanics are remarkably beautiful and handsome (women and men)—-eg., Jennifer Lopez, Selena, etc. But those traits I mentioned are generalizations. There are exceptions to every rule, and there are Hispanics who have light skin and greenish eyes. I think that’s really attractive too. But we should never get so caught up on physical traits——to do so would be shallow. I just like people for who they are——if they are kind and good then nothing else really matters, right? I know that sounds corny, but I think you know what I mean. :)

JLeslie's avatar

@Dr_C As you know by my answer I defended the Hispanics for being able to drive safely without understanding English, but you said do you really think it’s likely that someone that can get through a DMV test (that even some native speakers don’t pass) doesn’t speak the language? And actually the test is given in Spanish in many states, and people, like my mother-in-law, can barely speak English and she does have a drivers license.

gwendolyn05's avatar

Hmmmm , I think it depends what country youre from . I am dominican and puertorican and I look nothing like my friends from mexico or guatemala . I have dark skin and ridiculously curly brown hair while they have light skin and straight hair. Some of them have dark eyes and others don’t . Mine are gray . Were all hispanic or latino , whatever you wanna call it , but we look completely different . I mean seriously , at school people always mistake me for being mixed (white&black) lmfao

Jude's avatar

@tinyfaery You look Greek to me.

Skaggfacemutt's avatar

Let’s get back to the driver’s license thing. I can’t believe that they let me drive when I go to England. Wrong side of the car; wrong side of the road. Eeek! They must be crazy – I am an accident waiting to happen. I am sure hispanics can drive here safer than I drive in England, but that doesn’t mean they should get an American driver’s license, any more than I should get a British driver’s license.

Dr_C's avatar

@Skaggfacemutt what if the “hispanics” in your hypothetical are american citizens? are we making the generalization that all hispanics within the US are in the country illegally or temporarily?

Skaggfacemutt's avatar

Sorry, Dr. C. I was responding to John65Pennington’s thought about non-English-speaking hispanics in this country who want to get driver’s licenses but can’t read the signs, The very combination of being in the country and not speaking the language would indicate to me that they are here either illegally or temporarily, In either case, I don’t see why they would or should get an American driver’s license, because they could use the one from their native country, the same as I do when I visit England. That is what I was trying to say.

JLeslie's avatar

@Skaggfacemutt There are many legal, permanent residents in US who don’t speak English, and who especially don’t read English well. My MIL is one.

Skaggfacemutt's avatar

Before a person from a different country can become a citizen, they have to prove proficiency in the English language, a basic understanding of our government, and be able to say the pledge of allegience. Anyway, that is what I have always been told.

JLeslie's avatar

@Skaggfacemutt There are exceptions after a certain age, not everyone has to understand and speak English to become a citizen. Also, you do not have to pass an English test for a Green Card, or for temporary status of other types. I would think you would want people who are here for years, even if not permanent to pass a test knowing the rules of our roads. Plus, why should they get an exception any more than someone from another state? A tourist here for a couple of months is one thing. But, once you are a resident in a state, the state should be able to require a license I would think.

I don’t see what speaking English has to do with getting a drivers license anyway, as long as we have a test for them in their language. I speak Spanish pretty well, but taking a test in Spanish, I would probably fail. Enough stress taking a test in your mother tongue.

JLeslie's avatar

Lately I get the feeling that people lump all immigrants together who are not citizens. Illegal, Green Card, H1 Visa, there are many different types of statuses that are legal. Some are less permanent than others. Many people here are Green Cards and have been living here for 50 years. They basically live as citizens, but without the right to vote. Of course there are some other technicalities, but pretty much the average Green Card is usually here to stay. I do know one person who gave up his status after years of living in a different country.

honduranian_mami67's avatar

i am Honduranian (hispanic country in central america) . I have dark darkk longg hair and i have an olive complexion in the winterr and i get super tann in the summer. I think most of the general hispanic population has dark hair , dark skinned, and for the women curved body figures. The hispanics from cuba, dominican reoublic, and puerto rico generally have curly hair while central americans tend to have very thick straight hair. Alot of spanish women are really thick in the hips & thighs & rear ends & tend to have a shorter, more stocky/short type petitie figuree.

Dr_C's avatar

@Skaggfacemutt, I can see how you might think that. However, having lived in a border town most of my life and having friends on both sides of the border ( I split my time between Mexico and the US), I can tell you there are a lot of American citizens, some naturalized, some born in the country… who can’t speak english to save their lives.

Also, there are written driving tests and citizenship tests in spanish (as well as other languages). Don’t forget, the US does not have an official national language.

chessica13's avatar

@dpworkin I cannot believe how ignorant your response to this question is. Is it true that people actually live with such blinding stereotypes? Are you trying to describe a Hispanic? Because the way I see it, you are describing the typical gangster you see in soap operas. If you are going to answer a question, then do so in a civil and proper manner. Don’t just speak whatever you feel like saying. Have a basis for what you say.

On a different note, I will repeat what others are saying. It is rather difficult to describe the traits of Hispanics, due to what you had previously stated: it is a general term. Hispanics have numerous origins, therefore they can represent the ‘typical’ view of a Hispanic: Dark hair, dark eyes, tan skin, etc. Or, depending on where they descent from, they can have: Light eyes, light hair, light skin, etc. If you would like to simply view the general physical traits, I would suggest to google images on the various subcategories listed under Hispanics. I hope this helps you some.

JLeslie's avatar

@chessica13 He was being sarcastic. And he is no longer on fluther anymore, just so you know. He is extremely accepting of other cultures and nationalities and would never stereotype someone in real life like what he wrote at the top. You probably missed his other response lower down: “My personal prejudice is that in a personal way most of them are warm and open people. I know that’s somewhat of a stereotype, but when I lived in California as an unhappy, alienated young man, the one place I felt at home and was always welcomed was in the Barrio. As for the physical stuff, you’ve got it right, although for me, there are few features more beautiful than those of the classic Aztec.”. The physical stuff was they come in all shapes, sizes and coloring.

JLeslie's avatar

@chessica13 Oh, and welcome to fluther. Stick around, I think you will like it here.

Dr_C's avatar

@JLeslie you make it fun to stick around ;)

Avellaneda's avatar

It really does vary. Sometimes some traits of both indigenous and Spanish get active or lie dormant throughout generations. I for myself, am considered a first generation Mexican-American. Both my parents are from Mexico, and I out of curiousity, have studied throughout the years their feautures. My mother has black curly hair, pinkesh skin and dark brown eyes, and a slight nose bump.Her mother had yellow eyes and my grandpa light brown eyes, all of my aunts have curly hair, pink and yellow tones,with light browns and green eyes, yet my mother the darkest eye color.My mother’s side of the family is more curvy and paler. Yet, in my father’s side his family has more higher cheekbones, are more slimmer, and less curvy, and darker, more indigenous skin color where the darker tones have a bright red tone to it, and hair is straight. And I myself have dark brown hair, dark brown eyes, and sometimes get yellow pale or orange toned depending on this Texas weather. I don’t have a flat forehead, I don’t have high cheekbones, but I do have a slight nose bump and butt chin. Throught the years I been mistaken for Middle Eastern. My oldest sister as a Philipinne, and another sister as Spanish because of her pinkness and almost black hair. As for my other sisters they are all lighter than me as either paler and some turn pink. None of us have high cheek bones like my father. All of my sisters hair are straight waveish, and mines is the only one that turns naturally curly and crazy. One of them has light brown silky hair.Out of my sisters I am the only one that has thickness in the front of my thighs just like my mother’s side, and people think I work my legs out alot. The point is you never know what you’ll get. The gene pool is just amazing.

Response moderated (Personal Attack)
Hateyou223's avatar

Wider hips… Dark hair… Dark eyes

augustlan's avatar

@Hateyou223 Just to let you know, @dpworkin was being sarcastic. He doesn’t really think that. Welcome to Fluther, by the way!

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