General Question

dumbteenth's avatar

Is it illegal to sell tickets over face value on craigslist?

Asked by dumbteenth (205 points ) September 7th, 2010

I see posts on craigslist for concert tickets that are going for 50 dollars each. The original price (including service charges) seems to be 42 dollars each when I tried to get them online. Is this not illegal? I am in Virginia and can’t find laws on Google.

The concert is not sold out, just looking to see if I can get better seats (it’s GA).

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7 Answers

tablack01's avatar

Unless you are a ticket broker or go through a brokerage it is. Try stubhub.com if you want to get more than you paid.

YARNLADY's avatar

@tablack01 Could you give a source for that information, because I don’t think it is illegal to re-sell tickets that you have purchased for personal use.

Ben_Dover's avatar

@YARNLADY Ticket scalping is illegal in many municipalities w/in the USA.

Trillian's avatar

As far as I know, it’s called “scalping” and it’s illegal. the reason that it is illegal is the same reason that bootleg is illegal. Te proceeds for any event is supposed to go to those who bring the event abut, and those are distributed according to an internal system. X amount for the performer, x amount for the manager, etc.
For an ourside source to purchase then re sell tickets and make a profit is considered the same as piracy. Or it is illegal for the same reasons.

jrpowell's avatar

Not if you slap on a service fee. Just call it 42 and a small fee for checking my e-mail.

hungerforpizza's avatar

You shouldn’t do it, but no one cares so go for it

knowflake's avatar

It varies by which state you live in. The law in the state of the event doesn’t apply to you unless you live in that state. Here are the state laws:

Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Alberta (CA), Manitoba (CA), Ontario (CA)

No more than face value.

Connecticut, North Carolina

No more than face value plus $3.

Florida

No more than face value plus $1.

No sale of multi-day or multi-event tickets that have been used at least once for admission.

Georgia

Only the original purchaser, a charity or a licensed broker may sell for more than face value.

Massachusetts

No more than face value plus $2 (except that a ticket broker licensed by the state may charge for certain additional expenses related to acquiring and selling the ticket).

Mississippi

No more than face value for events held on state owned property and athletic contests at Mississippi colleges and universities; no limits on other events.

Missouri

No more than face value for sporting events; no limits on other events.

New Jersey

No more than face value plus the greater of 20% of the ticket price or $3.00 (except that a registered ticket broker or a season ticket holder may accept a premium of up to 50% of the price paid to acquire the ticket).

New Mexico

No more than face value for college athletic events; no limits on other events.

New York

No more than face value plus 45% of the ticket price for venues seating more than 6,000 and no more than face value plus 20% for smaller venues.

Pennsylvania

No more than face value plus the greater of 25% of the ticket price or $5.

Rhode Island

No more than face value plus the greater of 10% of the ticket price or $3.

South Carolina

No more than face value plus $1.

If your state isn’t listed, you can sell it for whatever you want.

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