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Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

High priced sunglasses is the high price for better technology or just the name?

Asked by Hypocrisy_Central (26798points) December 29th, 2010

When it comes to sunglasses does the price really matter? If one had a pair of $180 sunshades is it providing that much better protection to warrant the price, or is it only marginally better than $75, $55, or $23 dollar shades? Is most of that price just paying for the name but the actual glass or physics applied is virtually the same?

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3 Answers

Seelix's avatar

Higher priced glasses probably have an anti-glare coating, and there are different levels of UV protection. Different lens colours do different things, too – eliminating glare and whatnot.

But really, unless you really know what to look for, I think most of the time it’s the logo on the arm that people are paying all that extra money for.

Cruiser's avatar

The key is to get the highest UV protection and nowadays you can get 100% UV protection and that does not have to be super expensive either as under $20.00 will get you a pair. From there it is all about style and construction. I found this snip at an opticians website….

Typically, most sunwear lenses will be UV absorptive to some degree. If lenses are marked CR-39R plastic, about 88 percent of UV light is absorbed. If sunglasses contain polycarbonate lenses, UV absorption will be 100 percent.

All better quality non-prescription polarized sunglasses sold through optical stores are 100 percent UV absorbing. For the very inexpensive polarized sunglass — thin, bent sheet polarized types provide UV absorption. Lenses that are polycarbonate are usually UV absorptive. However, many cheap sunglasses use a material called triacetate. This material absorbs only about 40 percent of the UV rays. Lenses may also be made of other acrylic materials, which will vary from partially to fully absorbent.

To know that your lenses are 100 percent UV absorbing, purchase them from reputable companies, specialty sunglass stores or from an optical professional. Typically, most sunwear lenses will be UV absorptive to some degree. If lenses are marked CR-39R plastic, about 88 percent of UV light is absorbed. If sunglasses contain polycarbonate lenses, UV absorption will be 100 percent.

All better quality non-prescription polarized sunglasses sold through optical stores are 100 percent UV absorbing. For the very inexpensive polarized sunglass — thin, bent sheet polarized types provide UV absorption. Lenses that are polycarbonate are usually UV absorptive. However, many cheap sunglasses use a material called triacetate. This material absorbs only about 40 percent of the UV rays. Lenses may also be made of other acrylic materials, which will vary from partially to fully absorbent.

To know that your lenses are 100 percent UV absorbing, purchase them from reputable companies, specialty sunglass stores or from an optical professional. — Mark Mattison-Shupnick, master optician

mrmijunte's avatar

What Cruiser posted is completely correct. Now you also need to know that if you buy any of the fancy sunglasses like Armani, Gucci, Tom Ford, etc… all are made by Luxotica. This company I believe Italian has a monopoly of “powerhouse” brands, so when you buy a $300 pair of glasses, you can get the same ones, same manufacturer for like $50.

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