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seazen's avatar

I need children's poems and songs... details...

Asked by seazen (6113points) January 31st, 2011

I could google etcetera – but I’m wondering what poems, but especially songs, you remember from childhood – those that you memorized in order to learn something – like “head and shoulders knees and toes…” and the abc song, stuff like that…

If you feel like it – link to a youtube – and if you really feel like it – you could give details: when you learnt it – who taught it to you – mom, school, uncle bob…

:-)

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29 Answers

blueiiznh's avatar

My Grandmother sang this when we we little. a scandinavian childrens song
rida, rida, ranka
your tube version of rida, rida, ranka

Kardamom's avatar

Most of these song/games/poems/nursery rhymes were taught to me by my mom and some I learned in school.

Ring around the Rosy

London Bridge is Falling Down

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

The Hokey Pokey

Mary Mary Quite Contrary

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Ten little piggies (the game you play with the toes)

Wee Willy Winky

Rub a dub dub three men in a tub

Little Boy Blue Come Blow Your Horn

Jack and Jill

Mary Had a Little Lamb

Row Row Row Your Boat

Likeradar's avatar

I bought a Mercury to get to Venus, but how on Earth will I ever get to Mars? Jumping Jupiter! Saturn sails on Saturday! Uranus says Neptune’s selling Pluto’s car.

I learned that around age 7 and it’s still in my head. Poor Pluto. :(

tranquilsea's avatar

“My gal’s a corker she’s a New Yorker” – I learned this song in grade one and we had to draw a picture of the New Yorker gal.

“Itsy Bitsy Spider” – Sung to me as a child and I sing it to every baby I hold.

Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear, Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair so Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn’t fuzzy, was he?

blueiiznh's avatar

sorry, i misread the question. I will find the one I learned to count to 10 in german when I was 4 yrs old

eins zwei polizei

and a fun you tube version i never saw before

The fun things one can learn :D

bkcunningham's avatar

I had the nicest phone call today from my stepdaughter. She said, “Listen Granny.” And on the phone was my adorable 18 month old granddaughter singing the ABC’s song. I taught her by just singing it and making silly faces and dancing with her. As she was getting the hang of it, I found Elmo with India. She’s hooked now. We do the head and shoulders, knees and toes song too. She has it down pat. Itsy, bitsy spider; Mary had a Little Lamb; Star Bright, Star Light; I See the Moon; Farmer in the Dell; Old McDonald Had a Farm…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML8IL77gQ3k

When I was growing up, my mother adored books. I remember a big Mother Goose book with the most beautifully illustrated nursery rhymes. She’d have contests with us as we helped her around the house to see who could recite the rhymes and poems.

We had a subscription to Jack and Jill magazine and Highlights. I always loved At the Zoo by William Makepeace Thackeray’; Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star by Jane Taylor. We even did rounds with different songs like Frog Went a Courtin’, Are You Sleeping Brother John, Bonny Boy is Young…

I did the same with my children. I’m doing the same with my granddaughter and hoping to instill it in her wonderful parents.

I found this and nearly cried. It brings back so many memories of my Mom:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hr2IKU4UXqo

And Go Tell Aunt Rhody. I would have a fit because it made me cry and everyone would sing and laugh at me because it made me so sad.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cqu1f60GhDE

seazen's avatar

I love Baa Baa Black Sheep and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star – which are sung to the tune of the ABC song so it’s easier to learn.

filmfann's avatar

Shel Silversteen’s Dreadful is a family favorite

blueiiznh's avatar

@seazen btw my above german counting song was taught by Kindergarten teacher

Judi's avatar

Little Boy Blue by Eugene Field taught me compassion

The little toy dog is covered in dust
But sturdy and staunch he stands;  
The little toy soldier is red with rust,  
    And his musket moulds in his hands.  
Time was when the little toy dog was new,          
    And the soldier was passing fair;  
And that was the time when our Little Boy Blue  
    Kissed them and put them there.  
  
“Now don’t you go till I come,” he said,  
    “And don’t you make any noise!”   
So, toddling off to his trundle bed,  
    He dreamt of the pretty toys;  
And, as he was dreaming, an angel song  
    Awakened our Little Boy Blue—  
Oh! the years are many, the years are long,   
    But the little toy friends are true!  
  
Ay, faithful to Little Boy Blue they stand,  
    Each in the same old place,  
Awaiting the touch of a little hand,  
    The smile of a little face;   
And they wonder, as waiting the long years through  
    In the dust of that little chair,  
What has become of our Little Boy Blue,  
    Since he kissed them and put them there.

seazen's avatar

What is it about the recurring theme of little boys and blue? Come blow your horn…

bkcunningham's avatar

@seazen many nursery rhymes were written as propaganda and reflect historical events. Some believe Little Boy Blue represents Cardinal Thomas Wolsey from the English Tudor period. His Blazon of Arms included blue faces of leopards. Old Mother Hubbard is also about Wolsey. When Little Boy Blue is told, come blow your horn, it refers to bragging and arrogance associated with Wolsey.

Sorry to go on, but it has always interested me.

seazen's avatar

I am flagging you for off-topic @bkcunningham – just kidding – it’s interesting but I really need songs and poems – more songs, though – I teach kids ESL.

tranquilsea's avatar

I loved to sing Puff the Magic Dragon to my kids when they were little.

sliceswiththings's avatar

Showtunes! Most musicals are kid-friendly so we’d watch the movies, but more often than that we’d just listen to the soundtracks and sing. Every kid should know “Do a Dear!”

bkcunningham's avatar

From elementary school’s once a week music class:

Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgFZJqXS45M

Low Bridge (The Erie Canal Song)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcNJ2RMOd3U

Old Dan Tucker

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZbBLcyjfSU

This Land is Your Land

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSIy0wq_-8A

Try this site. I think it will help…

http://www.songsforteaching.com/index.html

tranquilsea's avatar

@bkcunningham I had completely forgotten about the Kookaburra song! Great addition.

seazen's avatar

@tranquilsea Forgot Puff – and now I’m looking up all the PPM songs – thanks!

Judi's avatar

How Much is that Doggie in the Window
Bushel and a Peck
Red Red Robin
Boom boom Ain’t it Great to be Crazy
Do Your Ears Hang Low
Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight
Small World After All

JLeslie's avatar

Well, most of the songs that came to my mind are already listed. I don’t think anyone said Bingo. As in there was a farmer had a dog and Bingo was his name-o. The kids get to clap, they like that.

I loved kookaburro, which @bkcunningham suggested. It can be sung in rounds. By the way she mentioned some of the history behind various songs. Ring around the Rosie was about Illness, I think the plague in Europe

Humpty Dumpty

Carol King’s Really Rosie album is very good. I love her ABC song Alligators All Around (the video is very poor quality). And, One Was Johnny Kids love singing along with all of the songs from the album. There is a movie, sound track, book, etc., but the songs are more elaborate than simple childhood songs we have listed above.

lynfromnm's avatar

I love all the songs people have remembered – quite a trip down memory lane.

“There’s A Hole in The Bottom of the Sea”, “The Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly”
“She’ll Be Comin Around the Mountain” and “Found a Peanut” are all songs in which you add an activity each round. Good memory exercise for kids, and they are hilarious.

JLeslie's avatar

Another one:

The bear climbed over the mountain
The bear climbed over the mountain
The bear climbed over the mountaaaiiinnnn
To see what he could see.

He saw another mountain
He saw another mountain
He saw another mountaaaiiinnn
So what do you think he did?

He climbed the other mountain
he climbed the other mountain
He climbed the other mountaaaaiiinnn
And what do you think he saw?

He saw another mountain
he saw another mountain
he saw another mountain
So wnat do you think he did?

He climbed the other mountain….. It goes forever.

cazzie's avatar

I love this website for kids rhymes.

http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=eh

@blueiiznh I found that with an English translation!

http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=578&c=8

I used to love that song, ‘Inch worm’ and sang that one to my son a lot.

Supacase's avatar

My grandma sang these little songs and rhymes with me almost every night in bed. (One of my best childhood memories.) There are so very many more.

Going on A Lion Hunt
Animal Fair
On Top of Spaghetti
The Wheels On the Bus
This Old Man
One, Two Buckle My Shoe
If You’re Happy and You Know It

lemming's avatar

This one could be good for teaching english:

I had a little tea party,
this afternoon at three,
it was very small, three guests in all,
just I, myself and me.

Myself ate up the sandwiches,
while I drank up the tea,
it was also I who ate the pie,
and passed the cake to me.

It was in a school book when I was a kid.

ducky_dnl's avatar

Does The Teddy Bear Picnic song count?

“If you go out in the woods today, you’re sure of a big surprise, If you go out in the woods today, you better go in disguise..for every bear that ever there was will gather there together because today’s the day the teddy bear’s have their picnic.”

My mom used to sing it like that. :D

This is the original I believe.

flutherother's avatar

I’m a little teapot,
Short and stout,
Here is my handle (one hand on hip),
Here is my spout (other arm out with elbow and wrist bent),
When the tea is ready,
Hear me shout,
Tip me over and pour me out! (lean over toward spout)

And another, no idea where this one originated but it was frowned upon by adults…

All of a sudden a great mealy pudden
Came flying through the air
It hit Mrs Kelly right in the belly
And knocked her down the stair.

and mustn’t forget Wee Willie Winkie

Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Up stairs an’ down stairs in his night-gown,
Chappin at the window, crying at the lock,
Are a’ the bairnies in their bed, it’s past ten o’clock?”

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