General Question

twothecat's avatar

How do you write the number 1698 in Roman numerals?

Asked by twothecat (391points) April 22nd, 2011

Is there more than one way to write this number? If so, what is the shortest way?

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24 Answers

yankeetooter's avatar

I think it would actually be MDCLXXXXVIII…

optimisticpessimist's avatar

I looked up charts which said 98 was XCVIII so I edited my response according to that.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

Check here. It came up with the MDCXCVIII

twothecat's avatar

That’s a good site.. but now I want to find out the difference between Gregorian and Julian calendars. :) Thanks!

gailcalled's avatar

90 translates into 100 minus10. = XC.

50 plus 40 is too long. (LXXXX).

Eight is always VIII.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@twothecat You can ask another questions or you can do some reading. This is a small excerpt “The Gregorian calendar modified the Julian calendar’s regular cycle of leap years, years exactly divisible by four, including all centurial years, as follows: Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100; the centurial years that are exactly divisible by 400 are still leap years. For example, the year 1900 is not a leap year; the year 2000 is a leap year.” The difference is about 11 minutes per year.

ragingloli's avatar

just imagine if we did not have arabic numerals. We would actually have to calculate with roman numerals!

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@ragingloli…but then it would be natural.

ragingloli's avatar

@optimisticpessimist
Yeah, like the french and their numbers. I hated that

JLeslie's avatar

I always found it odd thay 4 is IIII on a watch instead of IV. But I am sure this will get modded for off topic. I might have asked a question about it long ago? Don’t remember.

ragingloli's avatar

@JLeslie
I have never seen a watch were there was IIII instead of IV… But maybe i never noticed.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@JLeslie I had never noticed that before but I just looked up images of Roman numeral watches… that was interesting.

JLeslie's avatar

@ragingloli Are you sure? Even my European watches are IIII. Unless they are changed for the American market. Google it. I would google for you, but I will get American pages.

ragingloli's avatar

@JLeslie
I did. A lot of the results of those which use roman numerals do indeed use IIII. But there are also a few using IV

JLeslie's avatar

@ragingloli I have never seen a IV before on a watch? Was that a wristwatch do you know? Or, a wall clock? Rolex, Cartier, and every American brand I know it is IIII.

ragingloli's avatar

@JLeslie
All the watches I ever owned had either arabic numerals, or none at all. Or were digital.
That one in the link, looks like a wrist watch.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@ragingloli It reminds me of the face of a pocket watch.

JLeslie's avatar

I found my old question regarding number 4 on a watch. I need to reread.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@JLeslie and @ragingloli I found another one. I wonder if it is an antique way of numbering.

twothecat's avatar

I like how this question led to another topic.

optimisticpessimist's avatar

@twothecat Sorry, hope we helped some.

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