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mazingerz88's avatar

How would future human generations change the world?

Asked by mazingerz88 (19644points) May 28th, 2011

Is it even possible to predict with some accuracy how future generations of humans would be like in terms of how they may perceive the world they will inhabit and which direction do you think they may want to proceed, creation of better, freer societies or going back to the ways of old where mistrust, manipulative politics and wars dot the line of human history? Whether you are optimistic or somewhat discouraged can you state your reasons why and then express your own predictions as to how future humans might change the world?

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8 Answers

trickface's avatar

I think it will come down to how often history repeats itself.

We have seen throughout the centuries major tragedies occurring again and again like some human cycle. Now we’re truly in the internet era where hundreds of millions of people are very well informed (or perhaps told by the media) how the world is doing, that information as well as the lifespan of Democratic governance in the western world will help dictate how well our species will perform.

Rest assured the huge change we’ve been through in only the last 100 years will be matched, if not beaten by the change coming in the next 100 years, with fresh water, fossil fuels running low and global temperatures (naturally or not) increasing.

—-

I recommend this documentary (8.5/10 IMDB rating) ’Zeitgeist: Moving Forward

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1781069/

this covers the mindset of our current path and agenda, the consumerism culture, overpopulation and the USA’s almost imaginary debt ceiling. More interestingly it attempts to create a next-generation world in which much of the international trade manipulation is cut out by having self-sufficient cities sparsely placed around the world. It’s a little doomy and grim at times but always fascinating and definitely gripped me throughout, even though I don’t believe everything it preaches :)

mazingerz88's avatar

@trickface Thanks! Will definitely check that out.

marinelife's avatar

No, it is not possible to predict the future. Authors of science fiction have been trying for some 80 years with some success, but not all.

laureth's avatar

The Romans once were the pinnacle of success, especially in their own eyes. But now, there are potato fields growing atop old Roman roads, and their crumbling ruins dot the landscape as tourist attractions in a world that has gone on around and beyond them.

This tells me two things. First, that you can never specifically predict what will happen – I’m sure the Romans only saw things decline in hindsight. Second, that you can tell in general what will happen – things grow, plateau, and fall in time for the next big thing.

Ajulutsikael's avatar

I recommend all the Zeitgeist films actually. It really shows how we can make a difference if we go to a resource based economy instead of what we have now. Also proves that we never learn from our mistakes, lol.

Neizvestnaya's avatar

Have you seen the first 10 minutes of the movie Idiocracy? If newspapers are to be believed then that scenario isn’t too far off.

Ajulutsikael's avatar

I’ve seen it. I think we should shift from trying to make families to try to make resources available for the people we have now.

I wonder what will happen when the gov’t no longer has money to pay our checks? Will people riot and kill each other or will we group up and demand the change we need?

Imadethisupwithnoforethought's avatar

I am optimistic that things will improve. People have a tendency to ignore the positive. After Rome fell, the Byzantines continued to improve for 700 years.

Within Human memory, good men turned fire-hoses on better men fighting for freedom.

Humanity learns from it’s mistakes. Shame drives us. Our grandfathers allowed segregation, their grandfathers allowed slavery. We allow gay people to suffer under restrictions. Our children will be ashamed of that and refuse to allow it go further. I have no doubt that we are surely but slowly getting better.

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