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Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

What is the logic to being inebriated?

Asked by Hypocrisy_Central (26829points) June 22nd, 2011

If one eats something that made them sick, throw up, break out in hives, etc you would think the person would stop doing it no matter how much they loved the dish. I know diabetics who will avoid foods they loved because it will make them sick. Some people I know avoid fish because they will get sick if they eat it. They may love salmon but they won’t suffer the effects in order to have it.

What is the logic of being in that condition when it comes to being inebriated (most using alcohol more than drugs)? What is the logic to placing yourself in a condition where you hamper your control and awareness? Is being sober too boring, or too much to handle, that mental escape is necessary? If life is so boring, or that hard wouldn’t it make more sense to remain sober to figure out how to make life more exciting or cure the problems making life too hard?

What logical reason can you provide as to why someone need be inebriated over sober?

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25 Answers

downtide's avatar

There isn’t one. Alcoholism is a physical addiction, alcoholics do not think rationally or logically.

Judi's avatar

When I was young it gave me an excuse for doing the crazy things I wanted to do. They don’t call it “Courage in a bottle” for nothin’!

JLeslie's avatar

I think what happens is the person doesn’t believe they are going to get sick when they start out, and then after a few drinks loses their judgement on how much is too much and continues to drink when they should stop. They wind up sick, but I doubt they had the intention of getting sick, ifit happens all ofnthe time I figure it is likely they have a drinking problem or are very young and stupid.

I never drank specifically because I was terrified of puking, it is pretty much a phobia of mine. Well, never is a strong word, I will have a drink, but I usually don’t bother. When I saw a movie in jr high school about how sick you get from withdrawing off of heroin, I knew I would never try a drug, and never did.

Edit: and also I learned that 12 step programs have a lot of God and religion in them and that scared me off from ever temptimg fate also.

flutherother's avatar

Being inebriated isn’t much fun in itself but it makes socialising easier and the shared experience of getting drunk is a bonding experience.

Scooby's avatar

For me it’s just a side affect from enjoying a really good ale or whiskey on occasion in good company, it never makes me sick though, some people find solace in a bottle others find solace going to church, some even find it in both……. I never get sick from drinking alcohol but put me in a church & oh dear……. :-/

tom_g's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central: “What is the logic to placing yourself in a condition where you hamper your control and awareness? Is being sober too boring, or too much to handle, that mental escape is necessary?”

I think the “escape” thing is used by most people to explain what they are doing. My problem with this is that they’re delusional. Most of these people were never fully here to be able to be technically able to escape. Most of us walk around in a deluded fantasy world, then use an additional layer of drug/alcohol and call that the escape/release from a challenging world.
I’d like to see people try the opposite direction – go from their deluded, walking zombie existence to something more aware and authentic. That’s some good shit.

unused_bagels's avatar

It’s escapism. Why are some people willingly submissive sex slaves? Why do people masturbate when they could be doing something constructive, or read fiction when they could be learning something? Being inebriated, to an extent (as in, before you’re gut-wrenchingly, falling-down drunk), is enjoyable. It puts you out of control of and out of touch with your earthly self.

dabbler's avatar

Logic ? Hehehehehehehe… it’s fun and up to a point harmless.
Beyond that point a whole different matter as well noted above.

But seriously altered states can be useful and lead to insights and personal breakthroughs.
Habitually going on a bender doesn’t accomplish much though. And not everyone is a shaman.

zenvelo's avatar

The logic for an alcoholic only makes sense to another alcoholic.

Many alcoholics describe the first drink they ever took as a sense of discovery, that they finally felt like they “fit in”. It was “wow, I don’t need to be shy/fearful/angry, I can be who I really am.”

Alcoholics in general have difficulty dealing with their emotional state. What caused that emotional state may be a host of factors, but the solution is always the same: get as messed up as possible. I never drank merely to have a refreshing drink, I always drank for the change in feelings it gave me. I knew that I felt better after two drinks, and that if I was careful I could continue feeling the way I did after two drinks by drinking some more.

Lightlyseared's avatar

The reason people drink alcohol is to get inebriated. Therefore being inebriated isn’t going to put them off drinking now is it.

LuckyGuy's avatar

I have wondered about that my whole life. I have only been inebriated a couple of times and can find nothing positive about it. There is not one thing I do better when alcohol is involved. (That’s not true. I do get stupider, if that is a desirable trait.)
It kills brain cells, reduces “performance”, consumes extra calories and wastes money.
Unless it is a glass of wine that will enhance a meal, I’ll pick the glass of water every time.

KateTheGreat's avatar

There is certainly no real logic to it, but I like being inebriated at times.

It certainly is an addiction, but I like to use it as an escape from reality. Nothing more, nothing less.

Seelix's avatar

It’s not logical. But it’s fun. If you’re able to set limits on yourself – if you’re able to gauge how many drinks = fun versus how many drinks = barf and stick to that, it’s a ton of fun. Drinking responsibly isn’t hard for most people.

There’s no better evening to me than a few beers around a backyard fire with a handful of close friends.

Photosopher's avatar

The logic behind drunkenness is found within the reason for pursuing that state. Escaping the present reality is typically that reason.

deni's avatar

You can be drunk without being shitface blackout puking everywhere drunk. That isn’t fun, I don’t think there’s anyone in the world that enjoys a 24 hour hangover. I like being drunk (a good level of drunk, not blackout drunk) because I generally float around the bar having fun, random conversations with people I’ll never see again, dancing from place to place instead of walking, and cartwheeling home. How is that not fun.

SpatzieLover's avatar

I drink very little. Maybe one martini per month or less. I’ve also never understood the “why” behind getting inebriated.

Full Disclosure: My family owns a bar. I have many alcoholics in my family

@deni Is your logic behind getting drunk that it allows you to be freer to do random things?

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@downtide Thank you for that. However, there is a difference from simply being inebriated and alcoholism; one can be inebriated without being an alcoholic.

@JLeslie *_I think what happens is the person doesn’t believe they are going to get sick when they start out, and then after a few drinks loses their judgement on how much is too much and continues to drink when they should stop. _*I can see them going out not knowing exactly how booze work, so they drink too much unintended and get s*** faced drunk. Having learned that, they go out and do it again to the same result. Then where they should have learned they go out and keep doing it. That is like someone running around with a paper bag over their head and not learning they will keep running into the wall because they can’t see.

@flutherother … the shared experience of getting drunk is a bonding experience. Better than a round of golf, a game of billiards or bowling or a nice game of chess? If so, why? What makes it a better bonding vehicle?

@unused_bagels Haven’t seen you in a long while, was wondering about you. Happy to see you are still around.

Why do people masturbate when they could be doing something constructive, or read fiction when they could be learning something? Being inebriated, to an extent (as in, before you’re gut-wrenchingly, falling-down drunk), is enjoyable. It puts you out of control of and out of touch with your earthly self. First part, if I groom my dumbstick, read a book, shoots some hoops it may not be constructive but as soon as I stop I am back to being a fully functional, unimpaired me. If I were drinking (snorting, injecting, or popping something) I would still be impaired for who knows how long after I stopped. Second, what is the great part of being impaired or out of control? You would not try and drive that way knowingly. I said you can use my car but you can’t steer it or it stops when it feels like it, you would not care to drive it. Why would I think less of my body than a car I might drive?

@dabbler Logic ? Hehehehehehehe… it’s fun and up to a point harmless. Harmless, really? Ummm….these are the things I have heard about or seen personally from people who were inebriated:
• Hitting on another’s spouse, g/f, b/f, etc.
• Punching or attempting to punch someone out because of an argument or disagreement.
• Sexually assaulting or attempting to do so because the booze gave them courage in a bottle to act out what they had in their mind.
• Destruction of other’s property, either by driving over or through it or falling through it themselves.
• Losing property that was not theirs because they can’t remember where they left it for being high or drink at the time.
• Cheating on one’s SO.

I will stop there but as you can see, it might be less harmful to the person staggering around floating on a cloud but to those his cloud is drifting over maybe not so much.

@Seelix Drinking responsibly isn’t hard for most people. Maybe you should hold classes around here then, you could clean up.

@KatetheGreat It certainly is an addiction, but I like to use it as an escape from reality. ????? (:-Q

@deni I like being drunk (a good level of drunk, not blackout drunk) because I generally float around the bar having fun, random conversations with people I’ll never see again, dancing from place to place instead of walking, and cartwheeling home. How is that not fun. Because if I used experiences I had when I was younger and tried to embrace that life with friends they would not have thought it so well. They may not have been falling over drunk but they were too drunk to see that someone was sizing them up to get them into the parking lot to roll their dumb butts for all of their money, watch, and fancy pool cues. Not to mention a good friend of mine who was going to go get high at some acquaintance she hardly knew and he lace it with something or doubled her dosage to the point she was so inebriated she could not resist as he rode her hard and put her away wet. She was not doing too much floating after that. If I am around strangers, I do not know I want to be even more on the alert less I become an easy mark.

YARNLADY's avatar

I drink a glass or two of wine, or a bottle of beer three or four times a week. I nearly always have a drink at restaurants. I have only been sick from drinking three times in my life, and each time was at at special event where the drinks were free.

I enjoy the restful feeling I get. I remember spinning around in circles when I was little because I loved that lightheaded feeling, and I feel it with alcohol.

flutherother's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central Getting drunk makes you vulnerable, if you get drunk with someone it means you trust them. It strips away formality and posturing and exposes the emotions. It is different from a game of chess or a game of golf as you get to know someone in a deeper more fundamental way. That is part of the attraction of alcohol, especially to younger people.

KateTheGreat's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central I meant to say that getting inebriated is addicting for me. I use it to escape reality.

dabbler's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central I wrote “up to a point” harmless. So, yes, really.
I’ll agree that your list is valid past that point.

If anyone can’t tell where that point is they should stay away from inebriated.

deni's avatar

@SpatzieLover I guess in a sense, yeah. It’s not that I won’t talk to strangers at a bar when I’m not drunk, but it’s something different. I find it enjoyable. I find not being drunk enjoyable as well,it’s just different. I also like how if I’m drunk I can dance wildly and sing karaoke without feeling self-conscious at all. That’s a problem I have sometimes, and when I’m at all tipsy, I don’t feel it as much. It’s almost medicinal in that sense. (Don’t read into that too much. I don’t really mean medicinal, just that it aids me in that problem of mine.)

@Hypocrisy_Central If you’re that leery of every person you don’t know, then no, you shouldn’t go to bars, get drunk ever, or talk to strangers. But I’m not leery. I like humans. I think they are generally good, friendly, and interesting. You can’t be a dumbass about it….if you get so drunk that you don’t know that someone wants to take you and rape you, or someone wants to give you some drug to take that is laced with something else, then you’re too drunk, and I don’t think anyone is saying that that’s ever a good thing. You have to be smart about it, there’s no question. And if you can’t be, you shouldn’t drink.

chewhorse's avatar

There is no logic to be found from it.. It’s simply an ego thing or something that you want to forget which you had already forgotten.. Not everyone who drinks has a physical addiction but they do all have an ego presence (toughest dude in the bar.. quit staring at my girlfriend.. just wanna raise hell) you know, an ‘ego’ thing.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

@deni You can’t be a dumbass about it….if you get so drunk that you don’t know that someone wants to take you and rape you, or someone wants to give you some drug to take that is laced with something else, then you’re too drunk, and I don’t think anyone is saying that that’s ever a good thing.
If each drink is slowly making you less capable of factoring what is going on around you, how will you know when you have had too much? It would be as if you were sitting on a metal bench that was getting hotter and hotter, you may not know when to get off until after is burned a few inches off your hide.

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