General Question

flo's avatar

What is stewed rice, and how does it rank healthwise?

Asked by flo (12974points) August 3rd, 2015

I Googled it but it gives me results for “steamed rice”, or “stew” but not for stewed rice. The thing is, it is on the shelves at the supermarket among all the other kinds of raw rice. Parboiled, White, Jasmine, Wild, Brown, etc.

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35 Answers

jca's avatar

It would probably come up if you google “Types of rice stewed.” Trust me, I’m an expert googler.

flo's avatar

http://tinyurl.com/pl9o7zp
That is what that gives me.

ibstubro's avatar

Google stewed rice.

I cannot find a single product that is branded as stewed rice.
Stewed rice is a dish, and is prepared with any of the rices you mention (except possibly wild, as it’s not true rice).

jca's avatar

I googled it, too, and could not find it. I am going to check for it the next time I’m at the supermarket. I can’t imagine it existing if it’s not on google, but I’m open to any possibility.

Kardamom's avatar

This is the only thing I could find. It’s probably just rice (of whatever kind) that is useful for making stew, in that you add it to whatever stew you are making.

ibstubro's avatar

Ingredients
@Kardamom.

It’s the basic mix for making stewed rice.
I mean, I really looked for a product. Subtle or not.

Buttonstc's avatar

When I hear the term stewed rice, what immediately comes to my mind is rice congee.

This is a type of soupy porridge rice dish generally made from what is termed “broken rice”. I had it once in Philly and it was absolutely delicious. But when I returned to order it again, they said they seldom made it as it wasn’t a regular menu item.

I’ve tried any number of times asking about it at various Asian restaurants. Some have no idea what I’m talking about, others tell me that it’s really more of a breakfast item so it’s not available.

Both Congee and Chow Fun are really delicious but it’s so difficult to find Asian restaurants of any sort that have either available.

Congee really is pretty much the closest to stew that I’ve ever seen. It’s much more soupy/liquidy than any other rice dish I’ve ever had. But it’s really really good.

Kardamom's avatar

@Buttonstc In Southern California, rice congee is a fairly common dish in most authentic Chinese restaurants (you won’t find it at Chopstix or Panda Express), and it does sound like the stewed rice the OP is talking about. Congee is most often eaten for breakfast.

A bit of info and a recipe for Congee

Buttonstc's avatar

You lucky Californians.

Yeah, my search for it was at authentic Asian restaurants, the kind you find in the Chinatown area of most major cities.

I don’t really do Panda Express and the like :)

Thanks for the recipe.

JLeslie's avatar

Next time you’re at the market take a photo or make a note if the brand so we can look it up
online.

flo's avatar

I just got informed it’s made by the brand name ’‘No Name’’. I googled:
’‘kinds of rice by no name’’ http://tinyurl.com/oc9vvvn
“Types of rice by no name” http://tinyurl.com/ng5dn98
noname.com
noname.ca
“No name’’ belongs to Loblaws so I went:
Loblaws.ca, I searched ’‘rice’’—> ’‘by brand’’ and I got:
http://www.loblaws.ca/en_CA/search-page.query@rice%20.html

And there is http://www.fatsecret.ca/calories-nutrition/no-name
But it doesn’t include stewed rice.

flo's avatar

Okay everyone, oops it is made by NuPak.

ibstubro's avatar

A product, not an ingredient.

“No name” is the maker?

flo's avatar

By the way, what do you mean by “A product, not an ingredient.” since a product is an ingredient, and an ingredient is a product as well, don’t you think?

Buttonstc's avatar

I still think it’s broken rice (with which to make Congee). Since literally any type of rice can potentially be used in a stew type of dish, why would something be marketed as “stew rice”?

The only distinct type of rice which is specifically used for a stew-type of dish is the broken rice used in Congee.

ibstubro's avatar

Invalid link, @flo, but Wiki has this for No Name Brand.

ibstubro's avatar

Nupak does not make a product called stew rice.

flo's avatar

@ibstubro Are you from NuPak? Something like “I don’t see any stewed rice in that page.” is the only sure thing one can say just from looking at that page.
I don’t know why it is giving invalid re. the link, when clicked on, and when in a new window route. But it is the same page.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Your link Flo, says:
Bad title
“The requested page title contains invalid characters: ”%28”.

I’m really curious. When you make rice by itself, don’t you sort of stew it for a while until it’s done? And if you want rice as part of a stew, like beef stew, can’t you just throw any old rice in and stew it along with the meat? I can’t imagine there being any special kind of rice for stewing.

As for nutritional value, all rice is pretty much the same. I suppose brown rice is a bit more nutritious,because it’s not bleached, but it’s all rice. Like all bread has about the same nutrition, and all kinds of tomatoes have about the same nutrition.

Dutchess_III's avatar

And the link @ibstubro provided seems to show all the different types of rice NuPak sells, and stewed rice isn’t one of them .

jca's avatar

So it seems that NuPak does not make this rice and there is no “stewed rice” as a variety as per Google. Has anybody checked in a grocery store? I was in a grocery store before, but I forgot.

Dutchess_III's avatar

What exactly is it supposed to be?

jca's avatar

@Dutchess_III: She says it’s in the rice section, so I assume it’s a variety of uncooked rice (allegedly LOL).

Dutchess_III's avatar

But if it’s stewed it can’t be uncooked….?

jca's avatar

@Dutchess_III: It makes no sense to me. I’ve never seen it. Just going by what she says. It seems like she is saying it’s a raw rice called “Stewed rice.”

flo's avatar

Okay mystery solved.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riz_etuvé
Le riz étuvé est une forme de riz. On utilise aussi l’anglais « riz parboiled ».

Tropical_Willie's avatar

^^^ I still don’t see “stewed rice”. ^^^ I see Uncle Ben’s parboiled rice.

flo's avatar

@Tropical_Willie The store got the word “stewed” from the french word “etuvé”? and used it in the description part on the flyers.
By the way, I was just bringing up “on the shelf, ...raw rice” just to make it clear we’re not talking about a dish.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, I looked up parboiled rice and it looks like it may be healthier for you, although 50 percent of the rice people do it.

jca's avatar

I had read that basmati rice is good for diabetics – something about the way your body absorbs the starch in that rice. They also say that much basmati rice is counterfeited – not pure basmati.I like it. It’s not so mushy and it has a nice flavor.

JLeslie's avatar

My mother says the brown rice has more pesticides in it because the outside of the rice is left one. She says the Asians eat white rice every day and live longer than us. LOL.that her “scientific” study.

I eat Uncle Ben’s parboiled all the time. Not every week, but it is a staple in my pantry. I also have Basmati, Mahatma medium grain, and frozen sticky rice as staples. I never think much about one being healthier than the other. They are all starches, that’s what I think. The Mahatma and Uncle Bens are a very inexpensive item on the plate if you want to save some money.

Kardamom's avatar

And then there is the problem with Arsenic in Rice

JLeslie's avatar

Oh yeah, the arsenic. I think that’s higher in the brown rice also.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, there are poisons in lots of food! Tomatoes and especially tomato leaves, for example. Nothing to worry about, except don’t make tea out of tomato leaves.

There is arsenic it peach pits too.

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