General Question

La_chica_gomela's avatar

Do you feel like I do?

Asked by La_chica_gomela (12537points) July 22nd, 2008

Do you find it annoying that in many grocery stores “kosher salt” is put in the “Jewish/ethnic food” section given that “kosher salt” is generally not actually kosher?

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24 Answers

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

Yes, I find that rather unethical. The Jewish culture and other cultures should be respected, and it’s ridiculous that grocery stores can’t pay enough attention to their products that they put something “kosher” where it shouldn’t be. That’s practically mocking the extreme Jewish that eat the kosher products. They should be paid much more attention.

poofandmook's avatar

I had no idea that kosher salt isn’t kosher. I assumed it was since, you know, it says “kosher.” You learn something new every day, I suppose.

But now thanks to your question title, I’m hearing Peter Frampton in my head :)

PupnTaco's avatar

(wiki) Kosher salt gets its name not because it follows the guidelines for kosher foods as written in the Torah (nearly all salt is kosher, including ordinary table salt), but rather because of its use in making meats kosher, by helping to extract the blood from the meat. Because kosher salt grains are larger than regular table salt grains, when meats are coated in kosher salt the salt does not dissolve readily; the salt remains on the surface of the meat longer to draw fluids out of the meat.

Well, I woke up this morning with a wine glass in my hand.
Whose wine? What wine? Where the hell did I dine?
Must have been a dream I don’t believe where I’ve been.
Come on, let’s do it again.

gailcalled's avatar

@fly: By “extreme Jewish,” do you mean an Orthodox Jew? Orthodox Jews do not wander around supermarkets and fill shopping carts. They live in enclosed communities, by and large, and shop at Kosher stores.

La_chica_gomela's avatar

puptaco, that “great answer” is from me ;-)

marinelife's avatar

At my grocery store you find kosher salt with the salt. I am sure it is not a vast conspiracy. I guess I do not see what the big deal is.

Also, according to what PnT said, it would be an item needed by customers keeping kosher.

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

@gail; No, I don’t mean that. What I mean is that I’m half Jewish, and I don’t follow the kosher rules. I suppose it’s not extreme Jewish, I just mean Jews that follow the rules more closely.

El_Cadejo's avatar

@fly how can someone be half Jewish?

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

@uber; My mother is Christian, my father is Jewish.

El_Cadejo's avatar

@fly so what does that mean? You cant think for yourself and believe what you choose?

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

@uber; Pretty much. I don’t go to church or synagogue, though we do celebrate both Jewish and Christian holidays.

La_chica_gomela's avatar

I never said I thought it was a vast conspiracy, Marina, and I don’t appreciate you putting words in my mouth. I’m sure you do find “kosher salt” with the other salts, but it is often ALSO found in the Jewish ethnic food section. I’ don’t know what grocery store you shop at, but If you’ve never looked there, then don’t tell me what is or is not there.

poofandmook's avatar

@La chica: Whoa, slow down. I don’t want to speak for anybody but I don’t think it was meant with the volatility you exhibited in your last response.

marinelife's avatar

@La_chica_gomela I did not attribute the phrase vast conspiracy to you. I merely meant that I don’t think the grocery store means anything by it. They just group things certain ways. It is not always the way I would do it (thus hunting all over the store for things) or the way you would do it, it just is.

I also did not try to tell you what is or is not in your store. I merely said how it was at my store.

Not quite sure why you got so hot about my response.

La_chica_gomela's avatar

I didn’t say you said anything about my grocery store. I dont know why you want to argue with me about this. It’s kind of dumb. I asked a question. You wrote a comment. I wrote a comment. I didn’t get “hot” about your answer. The end.

Knotmyday's avatar

So, anyway… I like kosher salt, it makes for a tasty roast. Sage and Rosemary help too. Has there been controversy over the name, in the Orthodox community or elsewhere?

marinelife's avatar

I shall take the whole thing with a grain of salt—kosher, of course.

gailcalled's avatar

Orthodox Jewish men do spend most of their waking hours arguing*, but usually it’s not about salt. (See Mishna and Gemorah

*Topics codified: (note that they do not argue about being a man.)

Zeraim…Seeds – dealing with agriculture, blessings
Moed… Specific times – dealing with Holidays and Shabbat
Nashim… Women – dealing with marriage, divorce, etc.
Nezikin… Damages – dealing with finance, contracts, business, etc.
Kadashim…Sanctity – dealing with the sacrifices, the Temple, etc.
Taharot… Purity – dealing with the laws of purity.

Knotmyday's avatar

Cool. Would salt and food preparation fall under Zeraim or Kadashim?

gailcalled's avatar

So, nu, you’re asking me? (I am busy reviewing the ablative of “res;” unsuccessfully, I might add.)

Probably Nashim; since no Orthodox Jewish male would ever think about food and meals. They simply miraculously appeared, three times a day. Do you know about the concept of the Shabbos Goy? We could ask him.

Knotmyday's avatar

Can it wait till Saturday?

ebenezer's avatar

I was hoping this was a Peter Frampton question. It was a salt question…

gailcalled's avatar

@ebenezer: and one of our better questions about salt, I might add.

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