General Question

btko's avatar

What makes something Kosher?

Asked by btko (2811points) July 22nd, 2008
Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

13 Answers

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

It has to be blessed by a Rabbi.

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

A lot of people think that, though.

aidje's avatar

It has to follow certain rules, such as not mixing dairy and meat (a cautious extension of the passage that says not to cook a young goat in its mother’s milk).

La_chica_gomela's avatar

It’s actually pretty complicated. I would suggest reading this: http://www.jewfaq.org/kashrut.htm

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

Food is Kosher when its ingredients and manufacturing procedures conform with the Jewish dietary requirements. These requirements are outlined in the Torah and further clarified in the Shulchan Aruch.

timothykinney's avatar

When God says it’s okay. Which reminds me of a joke Dan told me once (here paraphrased):

God said “Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother’s milk.”

A rabbi responded “Does this mean we shouldn’t cook any kind of meat in the same pot as any kind of milk?”

God said “Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother’s milk.”

The rabbi continued, “Well, does it mean after eating dairy that we should consume meat only after waiting for 2 hours? Or that after eating meat, we should consume dairy only after waiting for 6 hours?”

God reiterated “Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother’s milk.”

Finally, the rabbi asked “Does it mean we should keep completely different sets of dishes and utensils for dairy and meat products?”

God replied, “Fine. Have it your way.”

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

@timothy; Haha…yeahh, I know, it really doesn’t make much sense. We Jews are crazy.

btko's avatar

I thought, like you say, that it had to be blessed by a Rabbi. Is that part of it at all? I used to work at a dairy plant (making cheese) and allegedly a Rabbi had blessed the plant making all of the cheese produced there Kosher..

But that’s not the case?

flyawayxxballoon's avatar

Well, it’s kinda sorta part of it, but not all of it… it’s hard to explain.

La_chica_gomela's avatar

There isn’t just one “kosher”. Many different Jewish organizations have different definitions of kosher, and each one sends their own rabbis to inspect food processing facilities to find out if they are keeping up to their standards. That’s why a simple “K” is not sufficient to signify that something is Kosher. For example Orthodox Jews look for the OU symbol (http://www.oukosher.org/). A large number of the Kosher symbols can be seen at this website: http://www.hanefesh.com/edu/kosher_Food_Symbols.htm. Just scroll down.

So, yes and no. For example, since fresh produce is not processed, it does not need to be inspected by a rabbi, but almost all processed food that is considered “kosher” at all has been inspected by a rabbi, not necessarily blessed.

timothykinney's avatar

At least we don’t have to inspect things to make sure they’re trafe.

La_chica_gomela's avatar

lol. Tim, you’re ridiculous.

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