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chelle21689's avatar

How soon should I give my job notice I am leaving?

Asked by chelle21689 (7394points) February 3rd, 2016 from iPhone

As some of you know, I just accepted a position at a university with great benefits and higher pay! After over a year being strung along with empty promises I found something better. My co-worker wuit last week with NO notice because he hated that we weren’t hired so I was left with the work load.

Anyways, I’m going on vacation this Friday and will be gone until Wednesday. Should I put in my notice tomorrow or should I wait until I get back? They want me to start Feb. 22, so should I give my job as much notice as I can? If I wait Wednesday it’ll only be like 1 week and 3 day notice. At the same time I feel weird announcing my resignation and leaving for vacation!

Keep in mind, I don’t have benefits here, workers are leaving one by one because of work environment, and if they let me go immediately I would be financially ok because I live with my parents still (hopefully move out soon). What should I do?

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34 Answers

JLeslie's avatar

If it were me I’d give notice right away. Still work out to the one week and three day point after the vacation ideally if you want them as a reference. They can start searching to fill your spot immediately.

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

I would also give notice right away. Let them decide if they want you to actually work for that time before you leave.

And congratulations!

chelle21689's avatar

Great, I will do that! It feels so liberating to tell them! They strung me and my coworker along taking complete advantage and they are losing us both in less than two weeks, well he’s already gone but still! I’m nervous because I know I will get resentment from him.

Earthbound_Misfit's avatar

Give your notice now. As I said on the other thread, leave on good terms. You might need a reference in the future. Just be nice about it. Don’t go into them stringing you along. You have found a permanent position that will advance your career and you’ve decided to take it. Thank you for the opportunity they’ve given you and you hope they’ll be able to find a suitable replacement quickly etc. etc.

Never burn your bridges. You just never know when you might need to re-connect with people from your past OR you might meet them in some future role.

chelle21689's avatar

if I tell them tomorrow and give two weeks does that include the days I will be gone? Technically I will be there for 9–10 working days.

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

Tell them tomorrow, and take your vacation as planned.

chelle21689's avatar

I just want to make sure I’m not burning bridges… I couldn’t have predicted this schedule lol

jca's avatar

Tell them tomorrow and take your vacation.

Are they paying you for vacation? Not that it matters. Take it anyway.

Pachy's avatar

Sounds like you’ve made up your mind to tell them right away, but I’ll leave my two cents anyway. Despite the difficulties you’ve had with them, you definitely want to leave in good graces because you never know when you might need references or contacts.

chelle21689's avatar

Nope I have no benefits.
@Pachy tomorrow will be two weeks notice. If I wait til Wednesday it’ll be less. I wish I could give more but my job is wanting me to start Feb 22. A week longer and it’ll be March 1.

jaytkay's avatar

I wish I could give more but my job is wanting me to start Feb 22.

Tell them that. Make it positive. You are excited about the new job, you wish you could give more notice, but you can’t pass up the opportunity.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Time to show some class Give them all the notice you can and be as generous as possible with them. They may not have the sense to regret treating you so shabbily, but if and when anyone asks, be sure to announce you’re leaving because the place has lower standards than you’re prepared to tolerate.

chelle21689's avatar

@stanleybmanly my coworker let the boss have it in a respectful sort of way but strong undertones of jabs LOL. He did the speaking for me and did not care to burn that bridge.

Me on the other hand, I need all the references I can get! Plus I like my coworkers and don’t want to leave them with a burden with no preparation. Last week my manager was all worried and now he will be even more worried because I’m the 2nd person to manage the account and right now training someone (she’s a temp too and he knows she won’t be there longer since she’s been here 6 months and both knew the previous assignment she helped with would be seasonal). He also bumped up my pay a measly few cents as a THANK YOU to help out! Insulting.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Here’s hoping the lesson of you and your friend’s departures will sink in on those responsible. Good luck in your upcoming adventure.

Jeruba's avatar

If I were in your place, I would not tell them anything until I got back.

chelle21689's avatar

So I told them, lol.

Anyways, I was just thinking about my position. Why am I exempt? I don’t think my job duties meet the requirements. I’m not supervising anyone, I don’t make independent judgements or whatever, and I don’t make hiring/firing decisions.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Exempt from what?

JLeslie's avatar

Sounds like you should be non-exempt. Have they been working you over 40 hours and not paying you OT?

Earthbound_Misfit's avatar

Like @stanleybmanly, I don’t understand the reference to exemption. Can you explain what you’re exempt from?

chelle21689's avatar

Exempt meaning salary. I think sometimes I might have to stay another half hour but some days sound like a 35–40 Hr work week so maybe it balances out? 8;40a-4:30p m-f including lunch.. Busier seasons 8:30–5p

chyna's avatar

@stanleybmanly Exempt means you are not paid hourly, you are paid a set rate. She will not get paid for any overtime she may work. Usually an exempt job pays more to justify the exempt status.

chelle21689's avatar

Yes I know but my position does not meet salaried requirements of classification from what I understand. Just trying to see how it’s classified as salaried.

JLeslie's avatar

@chyna @stanleybmanly Exempt doesn’t mean hourly vs salary really. It has to do with responsibility. Some employers think if they pay you salary they don’t have to give you over time, but the truth is it doesn’t matter how you are paid, if you are non-exempt then they have to pay you OT, so they need to figure your hourly based on your salary, and pay you time and a half for more than 40 hours.

Most exempt employees are paid salary.

@chelle21689 If it works out more or less that you worked 40 hours on average I would let it slide. If you want, on the way out the door you could let them know they might be risking a law suit and you just want them to know to help them. Probably don’t bother with this company though, since they were a pain anyway.

chelle21689's avatar

@JLeslie yeah that’s the advice I had. The benefits are great so I don’t think I’m going to risk it if I work 45 hours sometimes if it balances out kinda. If it ends up being 50+ often then it’ll be a problem lol

I think you misunderstood or I wasn’t clear. The new job is going to be exempt.

JLeslie's avatar

Here’s a link regarding the test for exemption. I’m sure there must be a FLSA government link too.

chyna's avatar

@JLeslie She is talking about her new job, not the one she is leaving.

JLeslie's avatar

I missed that. Ok, for the new job she needs to meet the test then, or she is non-exempt.

chelle21689's avatar

Hmm that link requires membership which you must pay. I shouldn’t make a big deal over t though as long as I’m not being exploited…right? If I am misclassified.

JLeslie's avatar

I didn’t need any membership to see it. That’s odd. You can always google FSLA exempt test maybe add in gov to get the government site. I bet it pops up.

stanleybmanly's avatar

This is rather unsettling news. So colleges and universities have now sunk to the level of banks and insurance companies in dogging their employees? I’ve heard horror stories regarding salaries paid untenured teachers. I suppose it only makes sense that administrative staff must fall under the lash.

jca's avatar

This is the advantage of a government job. You work under a union contract so it’s clear what kind of worker you are and what the rules are for wages.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Looks like civil service is the last refuge for the middle class.

JLeslie's avatar

Here is a PDF of the exemption test

chelle21689's avatar

Thanks. It’s kinda gray but I guess my job passes it. I can see it go either way though. If I’m out some days 35hrs a week but working 45 another from time to time it’s not a big deal to me as long as they aren’t taking advantage having me work 50/60 hours constantly.

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