Social Question

NerdyKeith's avatar

Do you consider yourself to be a classy person and why?

Asked by NerdyKeith (5479points) March 15th, 2016

Also what does it mean to be classy?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

30 Answers

jca's avatar

I think the term “classy” is so 1960’s.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

Not really, I’m kind of a dick and I don’t really care about fancy clothes or style. When I hear “classy” I think good manners, a clean mouth and stylish dress.

Seek's avatar

I’m not nearly wealthy enough to worry about that shite. We’re beyond the pale.

Earthbound_Misfit's avatar

I know what the traditional meaning of the word is, but I don’t think classy is about how you dress or what you have. Classy is about how you behave. Some of the poorest people I know have the most class. They have respect for themselves and others. They may not be fashionable, but they have pride in who they are. To me classy is as classy does. They behave with class.

johnpowell's avatar

I pee in a snapple bottle and pour it out my bedroom window if I don’t feel like putting on pants and walking the 15 feet to the bathroom. I reek of something and class is not it.

ucme's avatar

Anyone who considers themselves so, immediately excludes that crass tit from the definition.

LuckyGuy's avatar

@johnpowell is my new hero!

I define ti as someone with exceptionally good manners, dress, cleanliness, vocabulary, and mannerisms. Fewer than 1% of the population are classy. I am in the 99% group – sitting here in my underwear, unshaven, eating breakfast, and fluthering.

Espiritus_Corvus's avatar

Put it this way: I aspire to be, but I also recognize that I am a beast, a brute at heart. I can feel comfortable at both the yacht club and the merchant docks. But I prefer full frontal aggression versus passive aggression. With the former, you always know where you stand in the pecking order.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

@johnpowell
Ha ha ha, can’t say I’m guilty of that. Maybe camping when it’s below freezing outside my tent.

ZEPHYRA's avatar

Just dignity, good behavior and a clean, groomed appearance. Oh and genuine charm and poise. If that is what is reqired, then, yes I guess I have it.

NerdyKeith's avatar

Ladies and gentlemen, I must say a lot of your answers here are hilarious haha

SecondHandStoke's avatar

Good taste. Yes taste is subjective, but only to a small degree. Context, as is the case with practically everything, is critical.

I am a gentleman. I consider the feelings of others. I am well mannered. This way those close to me know I will handle situations like taxicabs and revolving doors, dance floors, etc. I address people with respect, especially if I need something from them. Again, context. I won’t do something ungentlemanly unless I know my audience and it’s for comedic effect. As is the case with taste, one must know the rules in order to break them now and then. I will use profanity, but only if it will solicit a laugh.

I tip discreetly. Well, I never flash money.

If there is no sign reading otherwise I will carry my coffee into your store. I depend on my deportment to suggest I won’t spill it all over everything. It’s amazing what you can get away with if you dress well, keep your voice down and treat other peoples things with respect.

Restaurants. You’ve been allowed into another’s place as a guest. I always behave accordingly. As with any business, those that are there to serve you are deserving of your respect. I ask names, how one’s day is going. Make the exchange personal and one will get so much more.

The car is a pavement wrinkling monster, but it doesn’t look like one to the average eye. Here demonstrating courtesy and even temperament can mean avoiding injury or even death.

Espiritus_Corvus's avatar

^^Yeah, see? Dats what I’m talkin’ about. Classy, like dat.

Coloma's avatar

I’ve long called myself “Bohemian classy.” meaning, I present, appearance wise, as a colorful hippie chick but I am pretty intellectually classy, well mannered and charming. I have excellent people skills, am gracious and can make anyone feel comfortable and I love to hostess and entertain. I’m not an uptown girl but I am of an uptown mindset.

NerdyKeith's avatar

@Coloma Bohemian classy? I love that. I think I’m going to use it haha. Especially since I’m in the process of growing my hair long.

PS Awesome I see that you have become a cat now

dammitjanetfromvegas's avatar

I have a T-shirt that reads “Fucking Classy.” I don’t wear it but it’s fun to look at.

Coloma's avatar

@NerdyKeith That is “Myles” my monster pussy, lord of the Gophers. lol
By all means, you may steal my descriptive. :-)

tinyfaery's avatar

Classy refers to the classes and one being better than another. The term classy is classist.

NerdyKeith's avatar

@Coloma Myles is awesome :D

@tinyfaery Well yeah, but I think its safe to say that the meaning has evolved since it original intention (as language generally does)

Coloma's avatar

@NerdyKeith Agreed, when I think of the term “classy” it has nothing to do with the archaic meaning of class separation. It means someone who is relatively educated, literate, well mannered and perhaps has a passion, just not for some of the finer things in life but for the arts, literature and intellectualism. Any of these traits can be expressed regardless of monetary station.

tinyfaery's avatar

Not in my world.

NerdyKeith's avatar

@Coloma, Well said, these days the term “classy”, basically means have standards and arguably a sense of self respect.

Coloma's avatar

@NerdyKeith Yes, those traits you mention as well.

MooCows's avatar

I consider classy as having confidence in yourself and
know your self worth. Having high standards and values.
I have always considered myself “classy” and I think that
is one thing men loved about me and women detested.
I still turn heads at 58 and am proud of it. I can walk up
to any man and start a conversation because I feel that
good about myself and what I have to give. Classy is something
you have and cannot buy., Either you are or you aren’t classy.
Its in your blood and DNA I believe.

Zaku's avatar

The classy-ness that matters to me and that I don’t take as negative, is “classy personality”. That is, people who behave themselves impeccably. Like when people respect other people and behave with care towards others, even possibly against their own immediate interests or convenience. Since that’s based on my opinion, I think I’m classy when I particularly approve of my behavior, and not when I don’t.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

We clearly need to meet @MooCows

GA.

SecondHandStoke's avatar

Will someONE please explain to me how the casual known as “classy” is classist?

While you’re at it, please explain “classist.” I live in the United States where a caste system like that seen in India or even Japan doesn’t exist.

Thank you in advance.

MollyMcGuire's avatar

Yes. And classy is never out of style, 1960s or 2010s.

Soubresaut's avatar

@SecondHandStoke from OED, only definition: “colloq. Of high or superior class, esp. stylish and sophisticated” (emphasis added). This definition was updated 2010, so the OED considers it a pretty recent description of the word’s usage. I just offer the definition to show that it could be argued the word still carries a classist connotation, even if many people don’t mean to evoke that connotation. Also, from what I understand, classes aren’t the same thing as castes; both are social hierarchies, but castes (if I understand correctly) tend to be more rigid both in their definition and their realization; classes tend to have a bit more flexibility in both areas (again, if I understand correctly). It’s been at least my experience that we speak in terms of some manner of class in the US—often mentioned are “middle class” and “working class.” I think people tend to avoid saying “upper class” and “lower class,” although if we have a middle class, it’s presumably in the middle of some sort of lower/middle/upper ranking (I’m not saying what manner of ranking). Classist would simply be, I believe, privileging one class over the others.

On the question: When I was dancing, I might have felt comfortable claiming that I was a generally graceful person—but now as I slouch while I type this, I’m not sure I can claim that anymore. Classy, though? Me? Not so sure!

NerdyKeith's avatar

I think the ladies from Chicago got the right idea of class.

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