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Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

Will a byproduct of a Trump administration immigration policy lead to a need for more homegrown Hi-Tech jobs?

Asked by Hypocrisy_Central (26821points) February 2nd, 2017

It is no secret that a good portion of Hi-Tech labor comes from Asia, and maybe a few other places. If less of those workers can get visas, would that mean US will have to step it up can cultivate more homegrown Hi-Tech jobs? Would that mean more tuition help for those Hi-Tech fields or, Incentives to introduce more of it in high school? If more homegrown techs are needed, how can that not be a plus for the job market or students headed for those careers?

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13 Answers

ragingloli's avatar

*Drumpf Regime

canidmajor's avatar

“Curvatures”?

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

^ I said cultivate, the computer had a mind of it’s own, and Spell-Check did not check it.

BellaB's avatar

Most of the good physicists I know in the US are either from Iran or Gemany (or both, I know a few that come from one country and studied in the other). It’s going to be interesting to see what happens with US science and technology (and the arts and…) in the next couple of years.

Looks like a cart before the horse situation is developing.

zenvelo's avatar

Nope. The administration is very much against any funding for education or training. It wants to bring blue collar jobs back to the US.

The Administration is fine with immigration from countries that have economic interests that coincide with those of the administration. So we’ll still be getting engineers from India and Saudi Arabia.

I still don’t know what a “curvatures to immigration” means. Replacing it with “cultivate doesn’t make sense either.

janbb's avatar

^^ Unless they’re mean to Donald.

zenvelo's avatar

^^^That’s why I did not mention Australia!

canidmajor's avatar

@Hypocrisy_Central, thanks, I was really wracking my brain over that provable autocorrect!

zenvelo's avatar

@canidmajor It still makes no sense

canidmajor's avatar

You’re right, @zenvelo, but at least I can construct (with some adjustments and word eliminations) a better sentence.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

There are quite a bit of good tech jobs that need to be back here. People always hear there is a shortage of tech trained people but it’s not true.

dappled_leaves's avatar

I’d love to know how a president who is openly hostile to science and scientists is going to somehow create an environment that fosters research and development of any kind. Hold on, I’m going to make popcorn.

Hypocrisy_Central's avatar

^ I’d love to know how a president who is openly hostile to science and scientists is going to somehow create an environment that fosters research and development of any kind.
I think how he feels is highly hyped but anyhow, it would have little to do with him, because if companies need High-Tech workers but find them short in supply, they can take the initiative to make grants and other things that will cultivate more interest of fund education of those interested in those fields. A byproduct of any immigration policy doesn’t have to directly be influenced by the government or the White House.

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