General Question

SergeantQueen's avatar

[Female health question] [NSFW?] Why do I get such painful cramps during my period? How can I relieve the pain?

Asked by SergeantQueen (7571points) May 5th, 2017

Sorry for such a personal question. During my period, I get the worst cramps. I get super dizzy and faint/nauseous. I also throw up a lot. It gets to the point where I am almost doubled over and can’t move because I am in so much pain. I went to the doctor, got blood tests for anemia and other things. They all come back negative. I have a regular and fairly healthy diet. I exercise regularly. I’m not sure why they get so bad. I’m thinking it’s hereditary, as my mother gets them just as bad, but I don’t know. Is there any way I can alleviate the pain? I take Midol for it, which works for a short time, but I would like something more long term.

(Not sure if this would be NSFW but I’m labeling it as such just in case)

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

15 Answers

si3tech's avatar

@SergeantQueen The reasons/causes of severe abdominal pain during your period are many and varied. Only a gynecologist could make an accurate diagnosis. Only after a “colposcopy” was I diagnosed with a uterus which folded over on itself. Apparently that caused my severe abdominal pain. I was not planning more children so having my uterus removed (not the ovaries) was the solution for me. I was mid thirties then. Endometriosis is a not uncommon cause for severe menstrual pain. I was embarrassed every time I went to the doctor when his nurse would come out to the waiting room and ask loudly “oh are you having cramps again”? I do understand what severe pain is during your period. Do not give up. There are answers/reasons for your pain. With what you describe, you need to see a specialist or gynecologist in order to get your diagnosis. I wish you well. God Bless.

LeavesNoTrace's avatar

Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common ailments that affects menstruating women. Often times, cramps are caused by the uterus contracting to push out the blood and endometrium you’ve built up over your cycle.

However, if you’re experiencing dizziness/fainting/nausea, you may need to seek medical attention. Anything from a hormonal imbalance to endometriosis, to fibroids, can cause such symptoms, or sometimes just your genes (Thanks, mom!). Luckily, most of these conditions are very treatable and can be made much more bearable if you have a healthcare provider who is intuitive and willing to listen to your concerns. (Not always easy since a lot of doctors dismiss women’s symptoms…but that’s another story…)

gorillapaws's avatar

Do you have varicose veins by any chance? Some women have backwards blood flow in their ovarian and other pelvic veins, a condition known as Pelvic Congestion Syndrome. Usually the pain associated with this has less to do with the menstrual cycle and more to do with your physical position (e.g. standing all day), so it’s probably more likely something else, but I thought I’d bring it up since this condition often goes undiagnosed by Ob/Gyns. Bad varicose veins, and or heaviness/swelling in the legs are indicators for Pelvic Congestion Syndrome.

SergeantQueen's avatar

Thank you guys :) I was a bit hesitant to post this, because I was expecting people to make rude comments about me posting this question, just because it is so personal. So thank you for not doing that. I’ll try and make another doctor appointment and explain all the symptoms again. Maybe after the second time, they’ll realize this isn’t just a one-time thing, it happens every month.
It’s been happening since I started taking Prozac. (I stopped taking it a while ago) It wasn’t this severe until I took the medication, so I don’t know if there is a correlation.

I haven’t actually ever seen a gynecologist before…(I’m 18). I don’t know what age you would start to go and It’s never been brought up.

snowberry's avatar

I had a similar problem, and my gynecologist prescribed anti-inflammatories. It worked, but it also stopped my periods all together. Then someone nutritionally minded told me I was low on magnesium. What do you know?! It cleared up the problem within a few days, and my periods went back to normal. No number of prescriptions will help you if you simply need better nutrition.

Suggest using a magnesium supplement that’s easily absorbed, such as magnesium glycinate.

Pied_Pfeffer's avatar

A gynocolgist is a doctor who specialises in the female reproductive system body parts. The reasons to make an appt. with one is for a regular check-up and when issues are occurring, exactly like you described. So yes, it’s time to visit one.

I recommend that you keep a list of of the symptoms, when they occur, and how long that they last. The doctor will also want to know about your menstrual cycle; how frequent is it, how long does it last, is it heavy or light, etc. The medication history is also helpful, along with weight loss/gain, amount of exercise, dietary habits.

Please keep us updated on how it progresses.

syz's avatar

How old are you? I had debilitating cramps for years and years. And then my cycle got weird and I would cramp for 7–10 days and bleed for two weeks, then start all over again in twp weeks. It was horrible. I wound up in the hospital because I was taking so much ibuprofen that I ate holes into my intestines. I finally had a uterine ablation and I wish I had done it years ago. For me, no menstruation in 3 years and only occasional mild cramps lasting about 1 hour. I am beyond happy with the results. But I doubt they’ll do it unless you’re past any potential child-bearing years.

SergeantQueen's avatar

I’m not sure I’d want my uterus removed I don’t know if I want kids

Pied_Pfeffer's avatar

Do not fear he worst. The best action you can take is to go to a gynecologist sooner rather than later.

For example, my sister suffered from similar symptoms as yours at the same age, and an exam by a gynecologist resulted in a prescription for a specific type of birth control pill. Within a month or so, the pain was gone.

Basically, what all of the posts above are trying to tell you is that there is a wide spectrum of potential causes and that the only way to resolve it is to seek medical attention from a professional.

snowberry's avatar

Yes, and don’t assume your professional knows what’s up. Some ( in my experience many) don’t. If you don’t get appropriate results soon, then get a second, third, fourth opinion.

Patty_Melt's avatar

It could be serious, but then it could be just the way things are.
I had severe cramping when I was a teen. I was told it would stop when I had a baby.
Sure enough, it all normalled out after my first pregnancy.
See a gyn, but if nothing is wrong, know that it probably isn’t forever.

Response moderated (Spam)
syz's avatar

An ablation does not remove the uterus, it removes the endometrial lining. But its definitely not something to do if you ever plan to have kids.

MrGrimm888's avatar

@SergeantQueen . Please get multiple opinions from multiple doctors, before making a decision that could maybe be prevented.

I’m sorry for your hard time.

Peace n love.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther