General Question

luigirovatti's avatar

Could you post some websites who allow for a short translation of a text?

Asked by luigirovatti (524points) October 3rd, 2017

For free and made by a human, not by a machine.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

30 Answers

Dutchess_III's avatar

Google translate.

Strauss's avatar

I don’t do a lot of translating, but I find Google Translate to be quite effective. Even idiomatic expressions, which can seem nonsensical if translated literally, seem to be translated accurately.

luigirovatti's avatar

Yeah, but I’m looking at some traduction made by a human translator.

luigirovatti's avatar

Think of the far-distant languages like Chinese, or Russian, or Arabic.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Google does those. Here is “How are you,” in Naynja: “Muli bwanji.”

luigirovatti's avatar

Try to translate “Kimi no na wa” to “Your name” with Google. I tried and it gives “I’m yours”. :-)

janbb's avatar

Try reverso.com and see if you like that better.

luigirovatti's avatar

I like the examples, but the languages are few.

Muad_Dib's avatar

It’s hard to get humans to do anything reliably for free.

Here’s a funny blog about mistranslated tattoos, for example

luigirovatti's avatar

Yeah, but a short text could be simple to have.

Muad_Dib's avatar

My general rule is, you can have it cheap, fast, good – pick any two.

filmfann's avatar

I used Babelfish.

Mimishu1995's avatar

Try to translate “Kimi no na wa” to “Your name” with Google. I tried and it gives “I’m yours”. :-)

Are you sure you enter your phrase in Japanese? Here’s Google Translate result for Kimi no na wa, which is quite accurate in my opinion, since that phrase literally means “your name is…” in Japanese.

luigirovatti's avatar

Are you dumb? This is Kimi no na “HA”.

Mimishu1995's avatar

@luigirovatti This is what normally read as “wa”: わ. And this is “ha”: は. But in Japanese the “wa” can act as a letter alone and a “to be” verb. When it becomes a “to be”, it’s written は but is still read as “wa”. I’m a bit disappointed that Google Translate can’t make that distinction, but that’s how Japanese works.

If you want more proof, here’s the original Japanese name of the movie.

P.S: I have N3-level Japanese, and this is common sense among Japanese learners. Don’t go around calling people “dumb” when you don’t know anything well enough.

Muad_Dib's avatar

Luigi – you’re literally here asking for help translating something into a language you only know or care about because of watching cartoons, and you’re going to be shitty to the only person on this site able to help you? Not good, bro.

luigirovatti's avatar

Anyway, I entered the phrase in japanese. There’s no need for you to try to show other results, because i could show easily my results as well.

Mimishu1995's avatar

@luigirovatti Where’s your result then?

luigirovatti's avatar

Anyway, what i meant earlier was that if you say “Kimi no na HA”, of course google translate gives away “Your name is…”. If you say “Kimi no na WA”, it gives “I’m yours”.

luigirovatti's avatar

Naturally, if you use japanese characters, it transpires another answer entirely.

Mimishu1995's avatar

No wonder why you can’t get a proper translation.

What you type in is, yes, it’s Japanese, but it’s not pure Japanese. It’s “romanji”, a transcription of Japanese into Western alphabet so that non-Japanese can read. Romanji provides an easy way to read Japanese without learning, but that’s pretty much the only benefit. Because Japanese is based on a complex system of symbols that doesn’t have a consistent sound, the romanji can carry a lot of meaning. For example, the reading of “machi” can be interpreted as 町 (city), but it can also means 待ち (the act of waiting). Without the “pure” Japanese romanji is too ambiguous to understand. Everyone needs the Japanese alphabet in order to understand Japanese, translators and normal people alike.

And don’t go around saying that using Japanese character will give you different answer. Japanese characters are a must to translate Japanese. Even a human translator will have difficulty understanding romanji alone for the reason above.

luigirovatti's avatar

Anyway, to return to the original question: I found some website which could be good for me: http://www.freelang.net/

LuckyGuy's avatar

You’re on Fluther. Ask and someone here might tell you.
I speak Japanese
Kimi no Na wa means your name. But there is much more in the Japanese meaning.

the pronoun Kimi means you. But its usage is reserved for close friends, lovers, or someon of higher station talking to someone lower.
no is like the English ” ‘s” or possessive form.
Na is short for Namae which means name. It is spoken by someone young and/or hip.
wa is a friendly, intimate way of saying “is”.

So “Kimi no Na wa” is “your name” spoken by a young person to a potential lover or close younger friend.

Ja ne.

luigirovatti's avatar

I appreciate your help, but maybe (just maybe =)) if i ask too many questions for translations, it might feel like homework.

LuckyGuy's avatar

@luigirovatti You’re fine – as long as it isn’t really homework. People here are quite helpful. They might not always be available but most are willing to answer quick questions when they have the time.
That’s what this place is about.

Are there types of questions you can answer?

Mimishu1995's avatar

@LuckyGuy his problem is that he thinks he can use romanji alone to get a correct translation, which I tried to explain above.

LuckyGuy's avatar

@Mimishu1995 Agreed. I intentionally wrote in romaji to make it easy for him to pronounce. With his avatar name I figured he was Italian.

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