General Question

flo's avatar

Is Donna Karan's fashion line the "asking for it" kind, the opposite kind, or something else?

Asked by flo (10342points) 5 days ago

If it it is neither the “asking for it” kind, nor the opposite kind, what kind is it?
http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/10/entertainment/donna-karan-harvey-weinstein/

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6 Answers

Mariah's avatar

No clothing is “asking for it.”

RealEyesRealizeRealLies's avatar

I’m not keeping track of the scandal. First I heard about it was your link, and the short video played. I agree with Mariah that no clothing is asking for anything.

But… Fashion (especially at this level)... is purported to help the wearer make a statement. Fashion doesn’t speak. People do.

So I’m left wondering, an honest question. When a person dresses in any manner, what statement are they making? For instance, an army General wears a uniform which helps him broadcast to everyone “I am in charge”. The Bell Hop uniform helps him broadcast “I’m here to serve”.

If a man wears his sleeves rolled up, he’s probably saying “I’m here to work”. If he’s at a nightclub with shirt buttons revealing chest hair and bejeweled necklace, he’s saying “I’m on the prowl”. If he’s wearing tailored suit with wrist bling protruding, he’s claiming to be successful.

I dress differently for different work environments specifically to broadcast what I’ve come to do.

But I don’t equate (necessarily) professional dress of the electric line workers yellow vest and hard hat with the skateboard punker on the street. One is broadcasting a message to others. The other may be broadcasting to others, or just themselves.

Not knowing, or caring how people involved with Weinstein were dressed, or if it played a role in whatever scandal he’s entwined within, I do wonder… honest question what are people broadcasting when they dress in a sexually provocative manner?

Keep in mind, if I suit up, shine my shoes and flash some bling, specifically to broadcast a level of success to whomever I choose, that dress doesn’t necessarily give anyone the right to take advantage of me, or my perceived success. The same should hold true for a woman (or man) that dresses in a sexually explicit manner.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

That depends on what “asking for it” means.

flo's avatar

If I leave my door ajar etc. when I leave it doesn’t mean it should feel entitled/justified to rob me.

RocketGuy's avatar

Having your door ajar makes it a lot easier for bad guys to come in, doesn’t it?

flo's avatar

@RocketGuy It does, for sure.

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