Social Question

Yellowdog's avatar

We have a lot of dams (Wilson dam, Hoover dam) named after U.S. Presidents. But why have ne never named a dam after God?

Asked by Yellowdog (4539points) 1 month ago

Don’t tell me because of the separation of religion and government, because God’s name and statements and Bible verses about God are all over public buildings and even our currency. Look at all those God symbols on a dollar bill for instance.

We have named dams after famous presidents so why not name one honoring God?

If it were particularly, shockingly tall or massive, people might accidentally exclaim its name.

I think its a shame we never named a dam after God

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23 Answers

kritiper's avatar

We did. God dam. But it isn’t a real concrete thing. Just like “God.”

Kardamom's avatar

Because not everyone believes in God. Not everyone who believes in a “god” believes in the same one.

Just because God is all over the money, doesn’t make that a good idea. There absolutely should be a separation between church and state, but you have to pick your battles.

I think most people in this country, myself included, would be outraged (and also think it’s funny) if someone tried to name a dam or a road or a bridge after some dude named God, who no one knows, can define, or can see.

imrainmaker's avatar

I don’t think it’s a shame not to name any dam after God but I won’t find it offensive either if there is one with such a name.

Patty_Melt's avatar

I can’t imagine why we would.

Yellowdog's avatar

Well, if people find God Dam offensive, they can go someplace else.

elbanditoroso's avatar

For the same reason that there are not dams named “Ma”

elbanditoroso's avatar

But you can buy Holy Shirts….“link”: https://holyshirt.com/

LuckyGuy's avatar

Is it because God did not arrange for the dam’s financing, or put the dam on the country’s strategic plan?

ragingloli's avatar

Because if that dam were to break, and flood the town below it, it would be an hilarious news headline: “Dam God floods Bumfuck, Alabama!”

NomoreY_A's avatar

Because God, assuming there is one, has need of dams. He designed this planet to function without our help. All we do is trash it out. And that’s all of us. Race religion or political affiliation aside.

Demosthenes's avatar

Because we generally don’t name things after deities. We name them after people, including saints or other religious figures, but not after actual deities.

ragingloli's avatar

Except of course for Mars, Hermes, Eos, Janus, and I am sure there are more.

imrainmaker's avatar

^Should have added man made structurs.

Response moderated
Patty_Melt's avatar

Build one in Hell, Michigan?
God Dam Hell

flutherother's avatar

Why not name one after God and the President? God Dam Trump.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

Same reason ships, buildings, parks and infrastructure like sewage treatment plants are not named after gods. Gods did not build or finance these things, people did.

Yellowdog's avatar

I don’t think Woodrow Wilson financed Wilson Dam in Florence, Al

JLeslie's avatar

God didn’t put the projects into motion, or allot funds for them.

Maybe give God a mountain or flower or something that occurs in nature, but a man made structure was created by people and money.

Just curious, do you just want the God Dam (no offense to any of those who are offended by that expression even if spelled wrong) or is it to be the Jesus Dam, Christ Damn, Lord Dam, ...

I gotta assume maybe this is a joke to get people to say God Dam, or see a joke in that anyway.

Yellowdog's avatar

It was intended as a joke, but even jokes generate good discussions in the right settings/communities

Zaku's avatar

They’d never be allowed to mention it on broadcast media regulated by the FCC…

Pinguidchance's avatar

In the heart of the Columbia River Gorge, a 1,858-foot-long steel-truss bridge spans the Columbia River at Cascade Locks, about forty miles east of Portland. The Bridge of the Gods, first built in 1926, derives its name from a much larger Bridge of the Gods that covered a part of the Columbia River in about 1450 AD.

https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/bridge_of_the_gods/#.Wt13nYhuYfI

kritiper's avatar

@Pinguidchance Not exactly on topic but worthy of note. GA!

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