General Question

flo's avatar

What is the word for helping someone to drink?

Asked by flo (11120points) May 22nd, 2018

1)The word for eating, drinking is injesting. Helping someone to eat is feeding. If I’m helping him/her to only drink what am I doing?
2)What is the common word for helping to eat and helping to drink?

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

33 Answers

flo's avatar

@RedDeerGuy1 When you want to tell someone you have finished helping someone eat, you’re just helping them drink, what word do you use, if you have to use one word?

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

Hydrate. I helped him hydrate.

flo's avatar

Thanks. I don’t know why it didn’t come to me.

Lightlyseared's avatar

Ingesting is not the word for drinking. It is a word that means eating drinking or taking any other substance into the body by swallowing.

ragingloli's avatar

The german word is “trän­ken”.

elbanditoroso's avatar

I’m not so sure about ‘hydrate’.

Technically, hydration deals with the body’s ability to absorb water, increasing the percentage of water in the body. You can be hydrated with an IV – you don’t necessarily drink the water.

So if you’re looking for a similar word to ingest, ‘hydrate’ isn’t it. Conceptually, they are different.

janbb's avatar

Feeding is feeding and giving a drink is helping to drink. There isn’t one word for it.

ZEPHYRA's avatar

Aiding in potation? Nah, I don’t think this is what you are looking for.

Response moderated
RedDeerGuy1's avatar

How about nurse? She nursed him back to health.

flo's avatar

Thanks all.

@Lightlyseared and @elbanditoroso I see your points.

@ragingloli But I’m looking for an English word.
@janbb Please provide a source for ”There isn’t one word for it.”
@ZEPHYRA No, I need one word.
@RedDeerGuy1 I think nursing someone back to health would include in every way, like turning them ove to prevent bed sores etc.

janbb's avatar

@flo My own knowledge of the English language.

flo's avatar

@janbb Our knowledge comes from somewhere. And some sources can be wrong too. Different sources say opposite or different things about all kinds of things.

canidmajor's avatar

Enfluidating.

zenvelo's avatar

@flo You can’t ask @flo to provide a source that proves a negative. That Would be an example of argumentum ad ignorantiam.

johnpowell's avatar

My sister calls it enabling.

flo's avatar

@zenvelo You can answer the OP if you want.
By the way, does @janbb need your help?

flo's avatar

@canidmajor I wonder if it could also mean via an IV?

ragingloli's avatar

@flo
It would not be the first word that the English language has stolen from German.

janbb's avatar

Psst @canidmajor just made that word up.

flo's avatar

@zenvelo Also, please respond to my response to @janbb (that our knowledge comes from somewhere)

elbanditoroso's avatar

I think the fundamental point is that you can lead a person to water, but you cannot make them drink.

canidmajor's avatar

Damn skippy I made it up! But it’s a good word.
And @flo, I would trust @janbb in this. She is a librarian at a higher institute of learning, with at least one degree past a Bachelors to back up her claim. That’s where her knowledge comes from. She doesn’t need our help here, but we are willing to jump in and defend her from your snidely presented disclaimer about knowledge.

flo's avatar

@canidmajor I responded to your answer to the OP. You can “infuidiate” (of course it’s a made up word) someone via an IV, yes?

canidmajor's avatar

Oh, @flo, do read it correctly.
And you didn’t know it was a made up word unless you looked it up (or believed @janbb), because it was logically constructed by linguistic standards. And your question is moot, because it’s a made up word.
And this line of discussion has moved into the silly realm.

flo's avatar

By the way, all words are made up, the moot point is that you made up the word, not the question, i.e the via IV thing.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

How about quench?

janbb's avatar

@RedDeerGuy1 The question is specifically about helping someone to drink – not just drinking.

RedDeerGuy1's avatar

@janbb Ok maybe no word exists yet? How about revitalize? refill? refresh?

flo's avatar

@RedDeerGuy1 Those words can be used for all kinds of things that have nothing to do with liquid and ingesting and people and helping someone to drink.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther