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jca2's avatar

Do you still use cookbooks, and if so, what is your favorite one?

Asked by jca2 (4568points) 3 months ago

I used to enjoy looking at cookbooks with my mother and my grandmother.

I don’t know if this one is a favorite, but I enjoy it very much and the recipes are not too hard to follow:

http://www.molliekatzen.com/books_moosewood_cookbook.php

Mollie Katzen, Moosewood Cookbook. If you look at the site, the graphics may be familiar to you, if you’re a cookbook fan or you’re into books.

Also popular with a lot of people are Barefoot Contess (Ina Garten).

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21 Answers

canidmajor's avatar

My favorite one iswhatever I find the most intriguing at the time. Currently I love Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamils. It’s beautiful as well as an interesting exploration of such a culturally diverse city.

zenvelo's avatar

The Joy of Cooking is my go to reference for general cooking, like roasts, turkeys, hams.

When I want to make something a bit out of the ordinary, I have an old copy of the New York Times Cookbook by Craig Claiborne.

Kardamom's avatar

Oh my goodness. I don’t know if I could pick a favorite. I love cookbooks as much for the recipes, as for the lovely photographs, and anecdotes by the book authors.

I still use cookbooks, and I also use online recipes, as well as clipping recipes from the newspaper and magazines.

I have a ton of vegetarian cookbooks, and I especially enjoy one on Japanese vegetarian cuisine. I’ll have to look at it when I’m at home to give the title and author.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Well, my favorite is The American Woman’s Cookbook, or something like that. It’s dated 1939. They don’t play in this book. Fried chicken? First you have to get the chicken and whack its head off and pluck the feathers.
And you won’t find anything made with chocolate chips.
Flour for bread is best if you let it sit overnight on the warm stove to dry out.

Most of the recipes I actually cook with, though, are stored electronically and they’re recent.

Demosthenes's avatar

I’ll admit that nowadays I get most of my recipes online, but I have a few cookbooks that I use and enjoy, including Nick Stellino’s Mediterranean Flavor, a book called Tasting Rome, an old cookbook that I inherited from grandparents called Elena’s Secrets of Mexican Cooking. I also have a few Yotam Ottolenghi and Madhur Jaffrey books, but I haven’t used them much yet.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

No favorites, I have 350.

KNOWITALL's avatar

I have quite a few. I like the big Betty Crocker one best probably, lots of ‘from scratch’ recipes that everyone enjoys. My old Baptist cookbooks from gma are pretty good!

Dutchess_III's avatar

I have a Pentecostal cookbook @KNOWITALL!

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Dutchess_III If they cook like these Baptists, you better keep it. My mom always invites us when her old skool church has dinner, those ladies are amazing!

Dutchess_III's avatar

Actually, what it is is a cookbook of recipes donated by the church members. There are a couple of my own recipes in it. It was printed the year my last baby was born. Those days are so long ago, they seem like a different life time.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Dutchess_III That’s so neat!.

I miss the food, the classic hymns and the old lady hugs the most.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I miss that song “Hallelujah.”

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Dutchess_III Hallelujah is beautiful!

janbb's avatar

@KNOWITALL @Dutchess_III Do you mean the one by Leonard Cohen that’s about carnal love as well as spiritual or is there another “Hallelujah”?

KNOWITALL's avatar

@janbb Yes.

Leonard Cohen explained: “Hallelujah is a Hebrew word which means ‘Glory to the Lord.’ The song explains that many kinds of Hallelujahs do exist.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Guess I didn’t really listen to the lyrics. However I like Jeff Beck’s version better.
Here are the lyrics @KNOWITALL. Kind of took the edge of my like off of this song. It’s pretty much about sex:

Well I’ve heard there was a secret chord
That David played and it pleased the Lord
But you don’t really care for music, do you?
Well it goes like this:
The fourth, the fifth, the minor fall and the major lift
The baffled king composing Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Well your faith was strong but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof
Her beauty and the moonlight overthrew ya
She tied you to her kitchen chair
And she broke your throne and she cut your hair
And from your lips she drew the Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
But baby I’ve been here before
I’ve seen this room and I’ve walked this floor
You know, I used to live alone before I knew ya
And I’ve seen your flag on the marble arch
And love is not a victory march
It’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Well there was a time when you let me know
What’s really going on below
But now you never show that to me do ya
But remember when I moved in you
And the holy dove was moving too
And every breath we drew was Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Maybe there’s a God above
But all I’ve ever learned from love
Was how to shoot somebody who outdrew ya
And it’s not a cry that you hear at night
It’s not somebody who’s seen the light
It’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

janbb's avatar

-@Dutchess_III Jeff Beck did a cover not a version; Leonard Cohen wrote the song.

It’s a beautiful song but I think it suffers from over-exposure by now. And I do think it funny when religious choirs of little boys sing it because it definitely refers to the sexual act and the end of a love affair as well as spiritual love.

chyna's avatar

And I’ve heard it sang at weddings. Not really appropriate.

JLeslie's avatar

Not very often, but I should. My husband is always wanting me to make some new dishes.

Kardamom's avatar

I just looked up the book I was thinking of. It’s called Japanese Vegetarian Cooking: From Simple Soups to Sushi, by Patricia Richfield.

I also have one of Mollie Katzen’s books, Moosewood Restaurant Celebrates.

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