General Question

flo's avatar

What do some plumbers say to do with a dripping faucet until they can get there?

Asked by flo (12306points) 1 month ago

If it annoys you or whatever the reason that you can’t let it drip until plumber gets there. Edit to add: Not so much for the annoyance but for save water and maybe save back and forth to check if rate of drip has increased which led to overflow.

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31 Answers

Patty_Melt's avatar

I don’t know what they advise. I have a portable dishwasher and it drips during most of its cycle. I tie a rag around the leak with ends hanging down. That doesn’t stop the water, but it does stop the noise.

flo's avatar

@Patty_Melt I’ve edited to add by the way.

Patty_Melt's avatar

If you want to flag me I’m OK with it.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Both of you should dial up the procedure for changing a washer on you tube. Honestly, the procedure is so simple and CHEAP that the mere asking of this question reinforces the tired cliche of helpless women.

stanleybmanly's avatar

Watch the video, and by the time the plumber arrives you can hand him the 15 cent washer, for which he will give you a replacement and charge you $30 or more for his trip!

kritiper's avatar

In the meantime, turn off the valve under the sink.

Inspired_2write's avatar

As @kritiper says, first thing is to turn off the water using the value under the sink.

flo's avatar

The OP says nothing where the faucet is, in a private home, or business etc.

flo's avatar

…And nothing about the gender of the person who would come across the dripping faucet.

flo's avatar

…And nothing whether the plumber is going to be working on something else with the faucet.
Assumptions galore.

flo's avatar

@Patty_Melt Thanks. You answered it before my added part to the OP, and it’s a useful answer. I don’t flag here and there and everywhere.

flo's avatar

@kritiper and @Inspired_2write good idea. But do all of them have valve? Also the thing is without depriving people of water in the meantime.

kritiper's avatar

You could always turn the water back on momentarily. Beside, it’s only until the plumber shows up.

Inspired_2write's avatar

@flo There is a tap to turn of under every sink.
It only cuts the water supply to that sink.

flo's avatar

@Inspired_2write Yes, most homes. I found something re. old houses with sinks no valve.

stanleybmanly's avatar

No valves at the sink? There should be a valve for the water line close to the point where the line enters the building, and usually near the meter. If the drip is in the hot water line,
(which is more frequently the case). there will be a shutoff valve at the water heater. And MY assumptions are neither sexist or unreasonable in light of the information provided by the OP. YOU might have the great good fortune in locating a plumber who would take pity on you, and tell you to change the washer. But of course, you can pay a plumber to change the washer or an electrician to replace your light bulb.

flo's avatar

…Last post edited to add.

kritiper's avatar

Shut off water at main supply, either under house or at water meter. Get a bunch of clean milk jugs, fill with water and use this until plumber shows up.

Adagio's avatar

Does the tap simply need a new washer?

flo's avatar

@kritiper But what do some plumbers say to do if the person who’s talking to them doesn’t have access to the main supply?

flo's avatar

@Adagio It does, but that’s not what the plumber would be coming over for.

kritiper's avatar

“Wrap the leaking faucet with a rag that extends down to the drain. This will muffle the sound to the point it won’t bother you until I get there.”

stanleybmanly's avatar

@flo “what do some plumbers say?” Could you tell us what YOU might expect s plumber to say? Rather, what answer would YOU give to a friend or neighbor complaining about a drippy faucet?

flo's avatar

@kritiper Yeahe that’s agood idea it solves the in case the rate of drip increases part, and the noise part, but how about to keep it from dripping at all.

stanleybmanly's avatar

REPLACE THE DAMNED WASHER!

flo's avatar

It could be dementia.

kritiper's avatar

@flo If you can’t shut the water off, if you can’t replace the washer yourself, if you can’t shut the water off using the valve under the sink, if you can’t shut the water off under the house or out by the meter, and you can’t wait until the blasted plumber gets there, rent out a room at a local hotel/motel and stay there until the darn thing gets fixed by the plumber!
Those are the only choices you have because the city isn’t going to shut off water to the whole town just for you and your leaking faucet.

kritiper's avatar

@stanleybmanly GA but you can’t replace the washer until the water gets shut off.

stanleybmanly's avatar

This is true. Can you imagine a house connected to a municipal water line without a shut off valve? Can you imagine a municipality that permits a house to be constructed without a shutoff valve? Or better yet, what water district would operate minus its own shutoff valve between the main & each residence? How would the district shut down the water for those delinquent on the water bill?

flo's avatar

@kritiper Apparently there is an option. But thanks for participating, and being clear on the concept.
@stanleybmanly re. my last post. See my next OP.

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