General Question

flo's avatar

Do you understand the following statement regarding Human Rights gender discrimination, Kijiji ad, etc., case?

Asked by flo (12381points) 3 weeks ago

I’ll let you choose the article you think is most reliable.
https://tinyurl.com/yxfofu2f (Google, Kijiji human rights 28 yr. old babysitter)
“Cyrynowski contacted her, the court ruling says, and she told him she was looking for a woman to babysit her kid, and apologized. The next day, he filed a complaint. The commission investigated the complaint, and wasn’t able to get ahold of the mother to get her side of the story; in March 2015, the investigator recommended she pay $1,000 or $1,500 in damages.”
The story starts out as A single father is being forced to defend himself within the Alberta human rights system after a 28-year-old man complained that he was discriminated against because the father didn’t hire him to babysit his two kids.”
But my question is, if the commision wasn’t able to get ahold of the mother to get her side of the story how could it be that they investigated the complaint, since it’s not investigated fully. How did they decide that she pay $1,000 or $1,500 in damages?

And is it legitimate for a parent to ask if a potential babysitter is male or female?
Feel free to comment on any aspect of the 2 stories, by the way.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

5 Answers

Dutchess_III's avatar

That’s ridiculous. A parent can refuse to hire whoever they damn well please.

Wow. This is at least the second time this Cyrynowski guy has stepped up to babysit, then filed a complaint when he wasn’t chosen. What a jerk. I hope he gets fined after this.

Absolutely it is legitimate to find out as much information about a person as you can, including whether they are male or female.

I didn’t see anywhere where anyone was awarded $1,000. The case from 2015 was dismissed, and I fully expect this one will be too.

flo's avatar

“An investigator in that case recommended” the mother be required to pay $1,000—$1,500 for “damages to dignity.”
I made an error. But just about that, I hope.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I found it.

“Cyrynowski contacted her, the court ruling says, and she told him she was looking for a woman to babysit her kid, and apologized. The next day, he filed a complaint. The commission investigated the complaint, and wasn’t able to get ahold of the mother to get her side of the story; in March 2015, the investigator recommended she pay $1,000 or $1,500 in damages.

But the director of the commission dismissed the complaint in April 2015, saying parents had the final say in who gets to babysit their children. Cyrynowski appealed the decision to the chief commissioner, who, in January 2016, upheld the director’s decision.”

But she didn’t have to pay. It was dismissed.

flo's avatar

I wonder If he had been picked for the job, should the women who got interviewed have had the right to sue.

Dutchess_III's avatar

Sure. Anybody can sue anybody for anything. But the answer would have been the same. Parents have the final say in to gets to babysit their kids.

Answer this question

Login

or

Join

to answer.

This question is in the General Section. Responses must be helpful and on-topic.

Your answer will be saved while you login or join.

Have a question? Ask Fluther!

What do you know more about?
or
Knowledge Networking @ Fluther