General Question

flo's avatar

What makes the volume of a transister radio, for eg., to go from loud to zero in less than 10 seconds or less, every time?

Asked by flo (12412points) 2 weeks ago

It’s a description I heard about it. It’s not dead batteries, they are on midway level. By the way it started out worse, it used to be on only for blink of an eye, and every time it did the same thing. and then it improved, to where when it goes to zero, you turn it off for say half an hour, you turn it on, the same thing (starts loud and in 10 or so seconds it’s zero volume). What is the problem since it’s not dead batteries?

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8 Answers

flo's avatar

Ok. What would lead it to be faulty? Meaning what do you do to prevent a faltering rheostat problem?

kritiper's avatar

Faltering rheostat problems are very few and far between. A replacement is in order to repair the radio. You can’t do anything to prevent a failure.

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

Old radio? Potentiometers can get scratchy and do this. A quick fix is to turn the volume all the way and off all the way a bunch of times with the radio off to remove the crud on the wiper.

This could also be a failing coupling capacitor between transistor output stages.

flo's avatar

@kritiper I take it you mean you’re not aware of anything that would prevent it.

@ARE_you_kidding_me Not old radio. New enough to be mostly digital. volume and search for stations analog.
I’m looking into where the wiper is (images google is not giving me anything radio related)

ARE_you_kidding_me's avatar

Does it have a volume knob or buttons? The wiper is on a potentiometer.

flo's avatar

@ARE_you_kidding_me I just came to this thread to add to my last post,and found your last post. No notified, on Messges for You”.
The volume and the tuning, not buttons. They’re analog, so whatever you call that’s not buttons.
@kritiper “Remove the crud on the wiper.” in @ARE_you_kidding_me previous to last post = prevent the problem by using clean hands it looks like.

flo's avatar

@ARE_you_kidding_me Thanks for the answer.
I’m looking at image/diagram at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potentiometer

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