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lucillelucillelucille's avatar

Do you brush your pet's teeth?

Asked by lucillelucillelucille (31116points) 2 weeks ago

How do they like it?
Ours do alright because the toothpaste tastes like meat. I’ve heard
https://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff486/diningroomtable/Dentalcare.jpg

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35 Answers

MrGrimm888's avatar

I’ve been a dog owner, for many years. I gave them special treats, to get them to clean their own teeth. ..

Do you mind if I ask what breed, the dog is? It would help me give a better response…

Vignette's avatar

Yes. If you don’t brush your pets teeth you have no reason to complain about dog breath, cat breath, rabbit breath.

MrGrimm888's avatar

Rabbits, are a prey animal. And therfore could die from restraint. Bad example.

Dutchess_lll's avatar

I never met a rabbit with bad breath.

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@MrGrimm888 _He’s a German Shepherd Dog & I have two Maine Coons.
They all get their teeth brushed on their vet’s recommendation and they all seem to like it.
Here’s my buddy. :)

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@gondwanalon I almost spit out my tea-lol

johnpowell's avatar

No. My fish don’t have teeth. And my cat is not allowed to eat bread and cookies so it doesn’t really need to have its teeth brushed.

ZEPHYRA's avatar

Tried many times but the mutts refuse.

MrGrimm888's avatar

LLL. I know a LOT about veterinarian stuff. Almost none of my friends in the field brush their animals teeth.
Most “dental” work, was pulling teeth.
We did most dental work, when the patient was knocked out, for other reasons. It mainly involved scrapping the teeth, while the animal was unconscious.
It was something we didn’t add additional charges, and would benefit the animal later.
Tooth damage, can result in heart disease. I know that sounds weird. But it is scientifically proven. Infection in the gums, can spread. So. When we saw it, we worked on it, regardless of the owner’s concern.

The girls also added finger nail polish.

ucme's avatar

We don’t, our Buddy would not take kindly to that…trust me lol
He has loads of dental approved chew stick treats though designed to clean as he eats.
His teeth & breath are on point, so must be doing it right.

josie's avatar

I’ve only had dogs. You should always brush a dogs teeth.

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@MrGrimm888 -Yep,I know about the heart & gum disease correlation.
The vet initially said to use baking soda on one’s finger for the cats.I got the toothpaste for them and a small brush & they’re good to go.:)

MrGrimm888's avatar

^They sell all kinds of products, for it. The best, is a glove with a brush on one of the fingers. The Toothpaste comes in like beef, and chicken flavors.

I always used peanut butter. I would just stick in in my dog’s mouth. Then she would lick all her teeth clean. It wasn’t as good as a dental, but it worked.

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

I have the finger brushes & they see to do better with the small toothbrush-so does my finger.
Now that I’ve got you here, I need to wipe out/clean one of my cat’s ears. Doesn’t look like mite & no one else has this except “Bill“Just a bit dirty.Anything ( a solution?) you recommend to clean them with?

MrGrimm888's avatar

There are a variety of ear cleaning products available, as well. You squirt it in the animals ears, and rub the ears. You can use a paper towel, and really get the gunk out. It really depends on the animals tolerance for such things. My dog was pretty used to having stuff done to her. She even donated blood occasionally…. If we didn’t have any available. We usually had several bags, in our facility. But sometimes, there were shortages, and techs would bring their own animals in, to donate.
We actually had 3 cats, that lived in the hospital, just for transfusions. Sadly, one of them just died under anesthesia once, during the process. I remember the day vividly. I wasn’t there. I was at a bar watching football. Adrian Peterson broke the single game rushing record, against the Chargers. I got a phone call from work, and another tech told me that Louise, had died donating blood. I left, and went home. I collapsed in the kitchen, and just started crying. My dog Wanda came running in, and stepped on my balls, and busted my mouth open with her head…
My lip bled for hours… My balls hurt for days…

MrGrimm888's avatar

^Yeah. Louise, was a sweet girl. She saved a lot of cats, and died saving yet another. Our staff just couldn’t revive her. Everyone was crying, and doing everything they could. Our mistake, is that until that happened, we didn’t install intravenous catheters, when doing blood draws. So. They had to try to get one in her quickly, while she was already gone. If we put one in before we knocked her down, she might still be alive. From then on, we put an IVC in every animal donating. Just in case. We never lost another donor, but the price was heavy… I still think about her. Our whole staff, suffered greatly from her dying. She was only 5 years old. We later adopted out, the other two. And to my knowledge, they have great lives…

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

@MrGrimm888 – I am not surprised you still of her. Animals can leave a huge impression. :)

MrGrimm888's avatar

Yeah. It hurts, when they hurt. It doesn’t make logical sense…
Why should I care, if a “lower” lifeform sufferers?

I’m not a smart person, I suppose…

lucillelucillelucille's avatar

Empathy is hardly stupid.

MrGrimm888's avatar

Well said…..

seawulf575's avatar

Yep. Just like with humans, dogs can get plaque build up on their teeth that can lead to rot, gum disease, etc. Some breeds are more susceptible than others per my vet, but all can benefit from a brushing.

josie's avatar

I use a toothbrush
@ZEPHYRA just like if you had brush a little kids teeth

MrGrimm888's avatar

^Good for you bro.It takes balls to stick your fingers, in the mouth of an animal. Even an animal you trust. I’ve seen bad things happen…

josie's avatar

^
Really, it’s just training. A few things you have to get out of the way real early besides house training
– how to behave on a leash
– tolerating trimming nails
– tooth brushing

MrGrimm888's avatar

^Those things are very relevant. But not the norm, amongst usual pets…. You must have a talent for dealing with them.
Go Josie….

seawulf575's avatar

Especially for dogs its a matter of trust. Once they recognize you are the lead dog and that you care about them you can pretty much do whatever you like…provided you aren’t hurting them. I had a dog that snarled and snapped when I reached down to her food bowl. That was unacceptable behavior. The last thing I wanted was for her to snap at one of the kids. I made it entirely clear that if I wanted to take her food, it was my choice and snarling and snapping was not acceptable. She quickly recognized that I giveth and I can taketh away…but I will always ensure she is fed and cared for. She got to be a very good dog. The hardest part of brushing the dog’s teeth is that they keep wanting to move away from the toothbrush. And it is hard to brush the inside of the teeth. Sometimes we have to have two people just to get it done, but really, pulling his mouth open and reaching in is not any sort of danger.

MrGrimm888's avatar

^GA, wulf.

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