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JLeslie's avatar

If you live outside the US: can you tell me what your country is advising regarding surfaces and COVID19 transmission?

Asked by JLeslie (59517points) May 26th, 2020 from iPhone

The US just changed it’s mind officially and are saying the virus doesn’t live long on surfaces. I personally think this is a farce, and that they are starring people away from using so many chemicals because businesses need them to open up and they are in short supply.

What are your countries saying currently, and if you have a link to your government health websites that would be great.

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6 Answers

anniereborn's avatar

Can I have a link on that? For some reason I can’t find it.

JLeslie's avatar

Actually, I looked it up just now and it really hasn’t changed officially it’s just news and social media being idiots!

Here are the links for a recent article and CDC guidelines that basically back what I’m saying. I should have googled before doing the Q. I have so many friends thinking we don’t need to worry about surfaces anymore. I’m pissed because surfaces matter for cold, flu, strep, coronavirus, we finally had the country having some awareness about how infection is spread and it’s being ruined.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2020/05/24/how-long-does-covid-19-coronavirus-last-on-different-surfaces/amp/

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cleaning-disinfection.html

Hawaii_Jake's avatar

You can check the NHS website directly. Superb and factual.

Lightlyseared's avatar

I think it’s important to understand that even though the virus can survive a long time on some surfaces the amount of virus left on the surfaces exponentially decreases over time. So you can be correct in saying the virus can survive for 48 hours on “surface” and simultaneously be correct in saying that the risk of contracting the virus from “surface” after say 6 hours of what ever is minimal.
Healthcare (as with much of life) is ALWAYS a risk/benefit calculation. Does the intended benefit of doing something out weigh the potential risk. Just because the advice has changed doesn’t mean the underlying science has changed or was wrong but that our understanding of it has.

JLeslie's avatar

@Lightlyseared The people who had studied his long the virus stays on a surface certainly were measuring half life and quantity etc. That’s not new information.

I liked that the country seemed to be gaining knowledge in how viruses can move from surfaces to your face and get you sick. It could help in flu season too. Flu, step, rhinovirus, etc. I can’t believe how many people didn’t learn as children don’t touch your eyes, nose, mouth, wash your hands,...it’s stunning.

Lightlyseared's avatar

@JLeslie Sorry probably misunderstood the point of your Q (alcohol) – for example the measles is one of the most virulent and deadly diseases we’ve ever seen (seriously in the Democratic Republic of the Congo it was killing more people than ebola) but develop a safe effective vaccine and eradicate it from every western nation and those same nations start thinking it wasn’t that big a deal and stop caring

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