Social Question

jca2's avatar

Is your community going to do Halloween this year, and what's your opinion about it?

Asked by jca2 (9512points) 1 week ago

Did your community decide yet whether or not they’re going to do Halloween this year?

If so, or if not, what’s your opinion about it?

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29 Answers

ragingloli's avatar

I think that, pandemic or not, “Halloween” is a horrible colonial export of socially sanctioned underage terrorism and extortion, and that “trick or treat“ers “need to be defenestrated at every opportunity.

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KNOWITALL's avatar

Oh yes, they’ve already been posting about it in local social media. The kids have had such a hard year, they won’t take this from them, too. My lights will be off as usual.

I did see a clever picture of a tube down to the street from a house for social distancing, so the kids get candy and they get to see costumes.

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janbb's avatar

I was wondering about this last night. I will see what the community is doing but if there is trick or treating, I may leave a bowl on the porch under a light with a sign. I don’t think I’d come to the door.

johnpowell's avatar

I don’t think it has been decided yet.

But I can’t imagine it will be a thing. I really don’t like the idea of a bunch of kids at my door screaming at me.

Dutchess_III's avatar

If my town is going to do Halloween, I’ll be handing out candy per usual. After thoroughly washing my hands.

JLeslie's avatar

I’ve just started seeing articles about it. It seems like there aren’t any final decisions yet. My guess is the areas immediately around me will do it.

I did a Q about this, and I think what I decided was I would be ok with it if I lived in a subdivision and felt neighbors would do their best to keep their hands clean before giving out candy, everyone wear masks, and I would buy candy for my kids to eat the first few nights while the candy they collected rests for a few days.

Where I live now there is never trick or treating (55 and up community) instead there are Halloween parties for any grandchildren visiting or the grandchildren go to a neighboring community if they really want door to door. Usually, the town squares are full of costumed people and we have a haunted house, and people wear Halloween costumes for a week to zumba and line dancing. I’m sure I’ll still see costumes around town. People will dress up for anything here. I have a friend who has a Christmas tree dress.

seawulf575's avatar

Haven’t heard if they are doing Halloween or not. I used to be “that guy” that would decorate the hell out of my house, dress up, do everything I could to make it as special for the kids as possible. But I’m not feeling it this year.

SergeantQueen's avatar

They are doing it in my community. We never hand out candy just because no one ever comes to our door. (our driveway is kind of long and a little bit secluded from the rest of the neighborhood)

I am fine with it. We aren’t really involved like I said so it depends on the other people in the village.

Kardamom's avatar

I think it should be cancelled. I believe LA County is cancelling it, not sure about OC yet.

Just like people should stay out of bars and restaurants, and crowds, and other places where people gather, unnecessarily. It’s too risky.

I’m sorry for the kids, but we are still neck deep in the Covid 19 pandemic, and we all need to make sacrifices.

Jeruba's avatar

I’m having trouble with the very idea of a community’s deciding whether to “do Halloween,” as if it were ever a community decision in the first place. Suppose “they” decide not to “do” Valentine’s Day, or Christmas, or Thanksgiving. Can a political entity simply abolish a traditional observance on its own authority?

Sure, I understand that some local authority could decree against the custom of letting kids go trick-or-treating (even if it never did require their permission). But it isn’t up to anyone to declare Halloween void. Does the government think they own this ancient holiday?

Meanwhile, the usual junk is out on display in the stores.

 
Halloween is not, by the way, an American invention. We can thank the Celts for Samhain and a variety of practices and images that go with it. The custom has morphed even in my lifetime, becoming more stupid and less fun all the time, as candy manufacturers took it over, but also generally safer than it was when I was a kid (the “trick” part).

JLeslie's avatar

@Jeruba I wasn’t thinking in terms of governments, but rather communities discussing and letting people in the subdivision know where people stand on it. I’d want to know in advance if neighbors will be at the door giving out candy when I take my kid around. A lot of communities I’ve lived in the last 15 years opted for Halloween parties at the recreation center in lieu of trick or treating. This year those parties are out.

The government can certainly offer recommendations for a safer Halloween.

Dutchess_III's avatar

My light will be on and I’ll be holding out the bowl of candy for the kids to choose from.

zenvelo's avatar

Today the county where I lived came out “strongly recommending no trick or treating”.

The local chamber of commerce sponsors a store to store trick or treating on the Saturday before Halloween race year. No word yet on this year. A lot of people are pushing for a social distance trick or treating.

JLeslie's avatar

@zenvelo Why on earth would store to store be safer?

I used to work in a mall and the stores spent hundreds of dollars on candy to give to kids and there was almost no shipping being done. I don’t see how it would benefit stores to do it, unless it’s different in your town and people actually ate at restaurants and shopped when they had their kids along in costumes. Does the chamber actually buy all of the candy?

jca2's avatar

@Jeruba: No, the government can’t decide whether to allow people to celebrate a holiday or not, because of course everyone has the right to do what they want. However, if the moms in my community all decide as a collective that they’re not going to bring the kids trick or treating, then it doesn’t make sense for me to buy candy to give out (unless I want to eat it, which sounds like a fun plan).

I live in a rural area but my little complex is one where people come to from outside to trick or treat because it’s small and it’s safe. I haven’t heard anything yet about whether or not neighbors or parents plan to give out candy or whether anybody will be trick or treating.

I saw a FB post about this very question which is what made me ask this here.

zenvelo's avatar

@JLeslie They are thinking that only allowing one kid or family at a time into a store while waring masks will be safe. But this is all speculation.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@jca2 “No, the government can’t decide whether to allow people to celebrate a holiday or not, because of course everyone has the right to do what they want.”

That’s the problem, as we saw spikes from 4th of July as well as Labor Day, across the country. I’m honestly not sure why anyone blames the government when it’s clearly an issue of personal choice, at this point. Anyone could easily spread it by handing out candy and not even know it if they are asymptomatic.

Demosthenes's avatar

The last time I remembered Halloween being canceled (unofficially) was 2001, after 9/11. My brother and I went out, but the streets were empty and very few houses were participating. I imagine this year could be like that. I don’t think there is any official word from the county on whether or not trick-or-treating is banned or discouraged.

jca2's avatar

@KNOWITALL: I was referring to @Jeruba‘s comment where she asked “Can a political entity simply abolish a traditional observance on its own authority? Sure, I understand that some local authority could decree against the custom of letting kids go trick-or-treating (even if it never did require their permission). But it isn’t up to anyone to declare Halloween void. Does the government think they own this ancient holiday?”

So, to that, of course, the government can’t stop people from celebrating as far as observing Day of the Dead or Pagan rituals or wearing costumes. They also can’t prevent people from knocking on the doors of others. They can initiate a curfew, yes, but as far as people’s personal celebrations, the government doesn’t have that power.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@jca2 Agreed. I mean whether it’s trick or treat, peaceful protests or a Trump rally, we all make our own choices as to the risk.
For me, handing out candy to kids and risking my mother’s life is not even a question.

Although rigging up a tube to drop candy to the street has an odd appeal to me, I’ll admit. :D

Dutchess_III's avatar

I’ll just do what the fast food joints do. I’ll pour the sterile candy into the trick or treat bowl, and hold it out for them to pick from, while wearing a mask.

KNOWITALL's avatar

@Dutchess_III Come on, have Rick rig up a tube, so you’re the only one with your hand in the bag. Are your grands going out? Sure hate to see any kids miss the tradition.

ragingloli's avatar

You could dress up in a Hazmat suit, then inject the sugar directly into their veins.

Dutchess_III's avatar

IDK about my grands. It’s not up to me.
Which ever kid shows up on my front door gets candy!

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