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Nomore_lockout's avatar

Have the Republicans shot themselves in the foot with the hard line on abortion?

Asked by Nomore_lockout (7040points) 3 weeks ago

I was was just reading an article on my phone news feed, saying that the usually animated Republicans are staying generally quiet on that issue. Even some Texas Repubs are thinking they maybe went to far. And Mid Terms are looming. What do you folks think?

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47 Answers

SQUEEKY2's avatar

I hope so!

Nomore_lockout's avatar

Yeah this was there big bad legislative victory, but generally speaking, crickets chirping. Be interesting to follow this.

Dutchess_III's avatar

We will see.

Nomore_lockout's avatar

That should have been their, not there. Stupid typos.

elbanditoroso's avatar

It’s too early to see how this will end.

But the right wing – the Tea Party – the religious right in whatever particular name they are using this week – has a history of shooting themselves in the foot.

It boils down the ideologues, who shout the loudest, getting what they want. The cost of that ideological-driven passion is that there is only a small number of their so-called ‘base’ that agrees with them.

So they win the battle temporarily, but they lose in the long term.

Tea Party and their intransigence gave us Obama…

kritiper's avatar

Inevitably, yes.

cheebdragon's avatar

Why would they continue to talk about it if they already won?

Nomore_lockout's avatar

Because it could well be a Phyrrhic victory for them. It’s an extremely hot button volatile issue, which will galvanize Dem voters and probably some independents and even some moderate Repubs. So it’s obvious why they feel the less they harp on it the better. Even Turtle Mitch tried to dodge the issue when he was asked about it. We shall see.

seawulf575's avatar

I doubt it. In TX about half of the voters support the new law. Significantly less oppose it. Most people in that state oppose a hard “no abortion” stance but support the 6 week ban. Since the law applies to TX that is where the impact will be felt the most. But to be completely open, the law did one specific thing that has never been done before legally…it established a point when life begins. By establishing a specific starting point (fetal heartbeat), they have said that is where life begins and it is no longer the woman’s body that takes precedence. THAT could have real impacts across the entire country.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

” In TX about half of the voters support the new law. Significantly less oppose it. Most people in that state oppose a hard “no abortion” stance but support the 6 week ban. Since the law applies to TX that is where the impact will be felt the most.”

Source please @seawulf575

elbanditoroso's avatar

As usual, @seawulf575 makes up his numbers

see this (the green survey)

and this

and this national polling

seawulf575's avatar

@Tropical_Willie As usual, you don’t like what I state so you demand a source. Here ya go!

@elbanditoroso Nice to have you make personal attacks. Typical for you.

Dutchess_III's avatar

We ALL “demand” sources @seawulf575. Haven’t you figured that out yet?

seawulf575's avatar

And yet many of you refuse to give them. I have figured that out. And “demanding” sources is a far cry from calling someone a liar. Funny you all give GA to rudeness.

Nomore_lockout's avatar

I called no one a liar. And how do you know who “all” gave GA’s? I’d be interested to know that.

seawulf575's avatar

@Nomore_lockout No, you didn’t. But @elbanditoroso did. And he got 4 GA for his rudeness. I don’t know for sure who the 4 are, but there are only 8 people that have commented on this thread. I didn’t give him one so that leaves 7. @elbanditoroso didn’t GA himself so that leaves 6. @cheebdragon is far too conservative to have given a GA so that leaves 5. And he got 4 GA. Not hard to make the claim, is it?

Nomore_lockout's avatar

It’s a damn Q and A site dude. People aren’t going to agree with you all the time. And I admit folks can be rude at times, myself included. Try not to take things personally. Express your opinion as you have the right to do, then move on to another Q. This too shall pass.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

And the Texan lawmakers want to make abortions a death penalty for both the doctor and the woman.

Also in you article @seawulf575 SMFH ! ! !

Nomore_lockout's avatar

Maybe a death penalty for people who sale fire arms to mental cases and felons, while we are at it. Oh, wait…

Tropical_Willie's avatar

@Nomore_lockout Yes you can go in the a gun shop drunk and buy a gun in Texas !

elbanditoroso's avatar

I’d make one final comment and then shut up.

I wouldn’t have named names, @seawulf575 , if you didn’t have a history of doing what I said you did. For 18 months or more.

So get rid of the indignation and keep in mind that people observe and notice what you say and do. And don’t forget.

Back to the matter at hand – the numbers are not supportive of your contention.

Nomore_lockout's avatar

That should have been sell, not sale, damn typos.

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Tropical_Willie's avatar

@seawulf575 – - -

One of the related articles was the following

AUSTIN (Texas Tribune) — A Texas lawmaker has filed a bill that would abolish and criminalize abortions, leaving women and physicians who perform the procedure to face criminal charges that could carry the death penalty.

The legislation, filed Tuesday by Rep. Bryan Slaton, does not include exceptions for rape or incest. It does exempt ectopic pregnancies that seriously threaten the life of the woman “when a reasonable alternative to save the lives of both the mother and the unborn child is unavailable.”

“It is time for Texas to protect the natural right to life for the tiniest and most innocent Texans, and this bill does just that,” Slaton said. “It’s time Republicans make it clear that we actually think abortion is murder. … Unborn children are dying at a faster rate in Texas than COVID patients, but Texas isn’t taking the abortion crisis seriously.”
RELATED: ‘Abortion is healthcare’: Austin Democrats file bills to restore insurance coverage for ‘Rosie’s Law’

Under the bill, women who receive an abortion — and physicians who perform the procedure — could be charged with assault or homicide, which is punishable by death in Texas, confirmed Shannon Edmonds, a staff attorney with the Texas District and County Attorneys Association. The association does not have a position on the bill.

The bill could require people to give evidence or testify about offenses involving the death of or “bodily injury to an unborn child,” and would offer immunity to those who do.

The bill bans abortions starting at fertilization; most abortions in Texas are currently prohibited after 20 weeks. The bill cites one justice’s opinion in a recent Supreme Court case that says the Constitution “does not constrain the states’ ability to regulate or even prohibit abortion.”

Slaton, a freshman Republican from Royse City, previously tried to stop the House from naming bridges or streets without first voting to abolish abortion. The amendment failed, but was supported by more than 40 lawmakers, about half of the Republicans in the House.

Asked about the bill’s language and effect, Slaton said, without further explanation, that he does not think his bill would “put a single person in jail. All my bill does, is say that an unborn child is the same as a born child and should be treated the same by the laws.”
PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Texas Republicans eye heartbeat bill reboot amid SCOTUS transition

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick has identified two abortion bills that will be priority items during the legislative session that started in January.

One would ban nearly all abortions if the Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade decision or otherwise altered abortion laws. The other has not been filed, but is expected to be a “heartbeat bill” that could bar abortions before many women know they are pregnant.

Similar measures have been filed before. State Rep. Tony Tinderholt, R-Arlington, received death threats and was placed under the protection of the Texas DPS after introducing a 2017 bill. The legislation did not receive a hearing — a related bill in 2019 died in committee.

Back in February, a Travis County District judge temporarily stopped Texas from a ruling that would have removed Medicaid patients from Planned Parenthood care services — even though the state does not generally pay for abortions through Medicaid.

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

KNOWITALL's avatar

The fact is that Reps never wanted unsafe abortions, this is cutting it a little too close for some. The ‘bounty’ is insanity.

Dutchess_III's avatar

If they didn’t want unsafe abortions why are they pushing them @KNOWITALL?

jca2's avatar

__”@Nomore_lockout No, you didn’t. But @elbanditoroso did. And he got 4 GA for his rudeness. I don’t know for sure who the 4 are, but there are only 8 people that have commented on this thread. I didn’t give him one so that leaves 7. @elbanditoroso didn’t GA himself so that leaves 6. @cheebdragon is far too conservative to have given a GA so that leaves 5. And he got 4 GA. Not hard to make the claim, is it?“__

@seawulf575: It might surprise you, but people can and do visit a thread and place a GA or a few GA’s without commenting on the post.

Nomore_lockout's avatar

@jca2 True. I do that myself occasionally. Will comment if the “spirit moves me”, other wise I’ll move on to another question.

JLeslie's avatar

I’m not sure. It definitely energizes Democrats, and not just in Texas, but everywhere.

I see a lot of people from Texas in a Facebook group I’m in. Most who comment in that group are conservative, and they seem a-ok with the new law. Those people also seem not too bright in general in that particular group. I probably will be leaving the group.

I would think a significant portion of level headed thinking Republicans are worried about the vigilante style bounty within the law. I will ask some of my friends maybe. I can’t imagine my closest Republican friends from college are ok with the law as it is.

Interestingly, when I lived in NC, that was the first time I met people who were conservative on social issues and liberal on fiscal. They were mostly Democrats.

seawulf575's avatar

@jca2 So what you are saying is it wasn’t any of you, you are all innocent. It was others that just randomly stopped in and gave a GA to support the rudeness. Got it.

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cheebdragon's avatar

“Morning Consult found 48% of Texas voters either strongly or somewhat approved of Abbott in polls conducted August 22–31, before the Texas abortion law took effect and the voting restrictions were signed into law, and after, from September 5–14”

https://www.forbes.com/sites/alisondurkee/2021/09/16/texas-abortion-ban-and-voting-restrictions-havent-hurt-gov-greg-abbott-approval-rating-poll-finds/?sh=1516a3afd2a2

Nomore_lockout's avatar

You can’t fix stupid.

SQUEEKY2's avatar

YUP and Texans prove that over and over.

Nomore_lockout's avatar

Be ridin’ up to Canuckville soon, gunnin’ for me a lumberjack libral feller ; )

cheebdragon's avatar

@Nomore_lockoutYou can’t fix stupid.” Not always, but you can certainly start here .

KNOWITALL's avatar

@cheebdragon Good article, thanks.

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