General Question

chefl's avatar

Will they be coming up with a tiny, and light, and removable battery, in cellphones?

Asked by chefl (838points) 1 month ago

Just like SIM cards don’t need to be big and bulky, is it possible that they can make the batteries removable light and small? Or do people prefer the hard reset etc?

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14 Answers

elbanditoroso's avatar

I have read a lot about battery technology. They need to solvefour or fivee problems, and so far nothing addresses all the requirements.

1. size – something small

2. but powerful enough to light up a cell phone for at least 24 hours or more

3. availability of trustworthy supply for whatever chemical they use for power. (in other words, don’t be dependent on some mineral that is only available in China)

4. Safe: it can’t catch fire spontaneously, and can’t overheat, and hopefully can be receycled – think Samsung and theri Galaxy phones that caught fire 3–4 years ago.

5. recharges quickly.

As I understand it, they can do three of them – but not all. Small batteries don’t have the oomph to go more than a couple of hours under load.

chefl's avatar

@elbanditoroso Someone out there can make it happen just like all innovations, is my guess.

ragingloli's avatar

There is incentive not to.
Remember that batteries used to be easily user replaceable in mobile phones. Just pry open the shell, and remove/replace. Now they are really difficult to open and glued in.
The reason for this: Batteries lose capacity over time, so after some years, you will be forced to replace the entire phone, preferably with a newer model from the same manufacturer.
Recurring revenue.

elbanditoroso's avatar

@chefl eventually, I’m sure. But they haven’t yet figured it out.

SnipSnip's avatar

Mine is tiny and light.

hat's avatar

Android phones had replaceable batteries for years, and we laughed at iPhone users and their battery woes. I used to carry an extra battery that I could swap in whenever I wanted and instantly be back at 100%. Then Android phones went the iPhone direction and they all have non user-replaceable batteries.

There is no reason for this other than to make money off of people having to replace their batteries, buy chargers and accessories, and replace their phones more often.

gorillapaws's avatar

@ragingloli _“There is incentive not to.
Remember that batteries used to be easily user replaceable in mobile phones. Just pry open the shell, and remove/replace. Now they are really difficult to open and glued in.
The reason for this: Batteries lose capacity over time, so after some years, you will be forced to replace the entire phone, preferably with a newer model from the same manufacturer.
Recurring revenue.“_

You’re not wrong, but it’s not entirely accurate either. Phones would be physically bulkier, weigh more and wouldn’t be waterproof if the batteries popped in and out.

hat's avatar

@gorillapaws: “Phones would be physically bulkier, weigh more and wouldn’t be waterproof if the batteries popped in and out.”

None of those things are true. There have been ip68 phones with removable batteries. And I’m positive even Apple can hire an engineer to build a waterproof removable back. Bulk needn’t be increased. But it’s also important that the drive towards thinner and more fragile phones isn’t happening because people like having less battery life. Most people would take small increases in thickness for functionality and durability.

gorillapaws's avatar

@hat “None of those things are true.”

If there’s a latch and interlocking mechanism, than those things take up physical space in the world. Also the phone needs to be encased and so does the batteries. If they can both use the same enclosure, then only one is needed if they’re 2 separate things, then you have additional bulk and weight.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

My phone can take pictures underwater, sealed battery !

WhyNow's avatar

It’s called engineered obsolescence. Walk in looking to replace your battery,
walk out with a new phone.

jca2's avatar

@hat: I have a Samsung and it has a removable battery. The phone is about a year old.

Tropical_Willie's avatar

This what is required to remove and replace a S20+ Samsung battery. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d6_2VXollE

jca2's avatar

@Tropical_Willie: I have a Samsung A21 and I just put my finger nails into it and rip the cover off, Then the battery comes right out. 2 seconds, voila.

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