General Question

Jude's avatar

Who is your favorite visual artist? And what is your favorite piece of theirs?

Asked by Jude (32112points) April 4th, 2009

I like Kalho, Modigliani, Edward Weston, Dahli and Egon Schiele.

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

57 Answers

Judi's avatar

That’s like asking what my favorite color is. There are so many to choose from and so many styles. It changes with my mood. There are living artists that I collect, and there are those pieces that just grab me and I have no idea who the artist is. I used to hate Dali, now I own a piece that I love. Some of it still scares me though.
There are Shegal paintings that I love and some of them I find disturbing. I appreciate Muro in a museum, but it makes me uncomfortable in my house. It all really depends I guess.

asmonet's avatar

Honesly, da Vinci is why I always wanted to paint. All of his portraits blow me away. And they have since I was five or six. I think this and this stand out the most to me recently. I just love the shadows. :)

Same for these two by Van Gogh. Yeah, I pretty much love everything he did. Really.

I’m kinda simple, I like the famous stuff. Oh well.

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

I love the Rothko color field paintings. It’s minimalist but when I stand in front of one of those, I drift off into indulgent art bliss everytime

AlfredaPrufrock's avatar

Chagall. There are 200 lithoprints of this one, and I have #160 hanging over the fireplace. it goes to my husband in the settlement; his inheritance money purchased it.

Lupin's avatar

Definitely M.C. Escher – Relativity
Careful! It is dangerous to study this print while stoned.

PupnTaco's avatar

I’m inspired by Jim Flora and Mary Blair, among others.

A_Beaverhausen's avatar

Warhol. there is no favorite. hes brilliant.

TitsMcGhee's avatar

I’ve got a list of photographers that could go for days, but my favorite fine arts artist at the moment is Fred Tomaselli.

Mr_M's avatar

Dahli. The piece with the melting clocks (sorry but I forget the name).

A_Beaverhausen's avatar

@Mr_M The Persistence of Memory

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

Check out Lucien Freud. Wonderful portrait artist.

asmonet's avatar

@Mr_M: And it’s Dali.

Les's avatar

Magritte is one of my favorites. I like to many to really narrow it down to just one. But of Magritte’s works, my favorites are The Banquet
and Time Transfixed

I am also a fan of Kandinsky. Although, I have no favorite. Just do a Google image search of him, and you’ll see why. I have this one hanging above my office desk. It makes me think of an mathematical equation. I find it very inspirational (as strange as that may seem).

TitsMcGhee's avatar

@Mr_M: I went to the Dali museum in Spain when I was 9 or 10 and FLIPPED MY SHIT. He had this person mummified to a piano… It wasn’t okay. Being an art student now, I appreciate Dali more, but he is still a bit creepy to me.

asmonet's avatar

I went to the one in Florida. Didn’t see a mummy, but I still don’t like him. His work screams crazy at me in so many different ways.

Judi's avatar

@asmonet, He was crazy!

asmonet's avatar

I mean, like carry a knife in hand between car and front door because you know he lives in the neighborhood kind of crazy.

wtf.

TitsMcGhee's avatar

@asmonet: His work also screams “done for shock value!” to me, but you have to have a bit of crazy in you to come up with that shit to begin with.

Judi's avatar

This is the Dali I have. I just love it. You may have to click on the image to catc the detail. It is like God is steppiong out of the picture into the world. It is called “Let us Create Man in Our Own Image”
I also have This one

asmonet's avatar

Funnily enough, out of those pieces, that’s my least favorite. I just can’t get past his crazy. I will keep linking people. Crazy, crazy, crazy. :)

I do like yours to an extent, I just… really hate the face. It looks like a yeti and it would distract me. :P

cak's avatar

@asmonet -—I get the similar feeling when I look at work by Dali – disturbing. It unnerves me. I do believe that is part of what he wanted. To unnerve people.

da vinci – it truly what I found something that just spoke to me, for some reason,
this did the most. I think the simplicity.

Like @asmonet – Starry Night drew my daughter in, she fell in love with the painting. As a small child, she just said she liked the way it moved and she felt like she was there. To date, it’s still her favorite.

SeventhSense's avatar

If you ever get to see the Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali at the Museum of Modern Art in NY you may be surprised at its scale-9.4 in × 13 in. It’s a very small work of art.
Every really great artist is a little nuts. I love Van Gogh too @asmonet but talk about nuts. He cut off his ear, drank turpentine, had a disfunctional reliationship with Gaughin and killed himself by shooting himself in the gut. He definitely wasn’t wrapped too tight…but man what Art

SeventhSense's avatar

Here’s a fantastic example of Dali’s brilliance as a draughtsman and arguably unparalleled since the Renaissance.

3or4monsters's avatar

Ursula Vernon. She does a lot of anthropomorphic skeptches, and her pictures alone tell stories. Also, she has a weird, quirky streak a mile wide that appeals to me. She is also the artist that orginally created the lolwut pear that has become so popular in internet memes.

digitaldogs's avatar

I’d have to say Picasso’s Guernica as it’s captivated me for hours.

Jude's avatar

@SeventhSense I love that last one of Dali’s that you had posted. This is the first time that I’ve seen it.

Judi's avatar

@jmah ;
I agree. My brother saw it at the Smithsonian when he was on his way to Vietnam in the mid 1970’s. I guess the original is huge. It still had an impact on him when we talked about it a few months ago.

asmonet's avatar

@cak: Oh, I just fell in love with you. I love his sketches of hands, and horses flanks. But particularly that one. For the same reason. The soft, quiet, simplicity.

asmonet's avatar

@SeventhSense: Like I said, Dali was kill you with a rock on your front lawn crazy, Van Gogh was just disturbed but directed at himself. :)

I don’t mind the ones that cut off their owns ears.
I’m more concerned with the ones that might confiscate mine.

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

Dali was good and when I first was taking art classes I was really big on him. Then as I learned about more artists and saw more work, I came to the conclusion that Dali was exceptional but there are so many that are as good if not better. Plus a lot of Dali’s antics were contrived and sensationalistic.

madcapper's avatar

@The_Compassionate_Heretic GA for Lucien Freud!
I really like Magritte, Hopper, Tanguy, Giacometti, and of course I Dali. I just love surrealism really.
My favorite non-painter artist is Andy Goldsworthy. He’s simply brilliant.
Here’s a fav from each listed artist Magritte, Hopper, Tanguy, Giacometti, Dali, and Goldsworthy gets three

3or4monsters's avatar

@madcapper Ohhh Goldsworthy. I’d forgotten how amazing his stuff is, thank you for linking him!

SeventhSense's avatar

@asmonet
Van Gogh was just disturbed but directed at himself.
Until you’re a prostitute and he sends you his ear..

TheRocketPig's avatar

@PupnTaco YES Mary Blair and Jim Flora rock. They most certainly influence me as well. If you like them might I suggest Amanda Visell

Personally, I’m very partial to Joe Ledbetter

SeventhSense's avatar

@asmonet
Your subjective fears as per Dali notwithstanding there was more than a few incidences of Van Gogh’s violent behavior. He is often romanticized but during his time was feared by townspeople. Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890)suffered from recurrent psychotic episodes -US National Library of Medicine.
Dali on the contrary was merely grandiose as were most of the Surrealists.

Judi's avatar

Dali was an addict.

TheRocketPig's avatar

@Judi very true… but his mustache was amazing

I’m really a fan of Dali’s photography. It’s probably the only photography I like.

TitsMcGhee's avatar

@TheRocketPig: That is a huge generalization there, saying that’s the only photography you like. Photoraphy is everywhere around you. It’s an amazing media, and I’d urge you to pay attention to some of it. I just so happen to be in school to become a photographer, so yeah…

asmonet's avatar

@TheRocketPig: Finally, someone mentions the one redeeming factor I can find in that man. It was fantastic.

@SeventhSense: I am not naive, I have studied them both, I know he was mentally ill. My point is, Dali gives me more heebie jeebies.

Judi's avatar

@asmonet are you sure you’re not my daughter? lol

asmonet's avatar

Yep, but I’ll consider changing that fact. :)

SeventhSense's avatar

@asmonet
yes but you said, Dali was kill you with a rock on your front lawn crazy
Sounds pretty inflammatory and without basis.

ShanSlumbers's avatar

I’m going to go with Alex Pardee. Favorite piece is called eScaped Conviction.

TheRocketPig's avatar

@TitsMcGhee I meant no offense. In the decade I spent in art school I have been exposed to a massive amount of photography… the only stuff that really holds my attention is photography dealing with the “decisive moment”. Henri Cartier-Bresson basically started this idea of that captured moment in time, and gave birth to “street photography” (candid “unplanned” photography) which is one of the things I really dislike about contemporary photography anyway. So in this… I’m torn. I like that deciding factor of photography… but I really dislike candid snapshots…

That’s where Dali comes in.

I enjoy Dali’s photography probably more than anyone else’s because of the sheer amount of controlled chaos in the piece. It’s still dealing with the “decisive moment”, but there is quite a bit of control going on with what’s being photographed.

asmonet's avatar

@SeventhSense: What’s he gonna do? Cry?

TitsMcGhee's avatar

@TheRocketPig: Wait… you just said that you like the decisive moment, but not street photography/candids? That’s the most integral part of that genre of images. Any photograph has an element of the decisive moment, but Cartier-Bresson’s street photographs are the epitome of it (example one and two). I mean, what about something like Yves Klein ? I’m just sayin…

TheRocketPig's avatar

@TitsMcGhee That’s exactly what I meant… I like the decisive moment… but I also like more control. Hence Dali. Dali did the photograph I showed almost 10 years before Cartier-Bresson wrote about the decisive moment. I just mentioned it to explain what I liked about the piece. I understand that all pics have the decisive moment… it’s just if I should care what decisive moment is being recorded. It’s not like I’m denouncing photography as an art form… generally speaking, there just isn’t a lot there that excites me…

btw… I’ll take Klein’s sculpture and paintings over his photography any day.

asmonet's avatar

I’m loving where this thread went, art nerds….FIGHT.

Uh…politely of course.
…Pretend you’re British.

TheRocketPig's avatar

@asmonet… I pretend I’m british all the time

asmonet's avatar

Fantastico!
;)

veronasgirl's avatar

Being an art major I feel silly choosing the standard-favorite-artist-for-the-general-public, BUT I adore Vincent Van Gogh. Starry Night is the reason that when I was 8 I decided to pursue art.

asmonet's avatar

@veronasgirl: Good choice, art twin. Starry Night and the da Vinci’s did it for me. :D

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