General Question

Zen's avatar

Are you a hunter, or a gatherer at heart?

Asked by Zen (7743points) April 10th, 2009

Are only men the hunters? Can’t I gather something without being called a sissy? And are only Amazon women the hunters? What about Diana, huh?!

Observing members: 0 Composing members: 0

31 Answers

Lothloriengaladriel's avatar

Stop being a sissy zen!

Zen's avatar

I knew it! Let me finish doing the dishes and putting my newest pottery in the kiln, and I’ll get back to this discussion. I’m looking for wild mushrooms later, wanna come?

BTW: There are hockey players, famous really good ones, macho types, that knit.

Lothloriengaladriel's avatar

I’m so there!

BTW: I don’t judge, sorta
(:

Zen's avatar

@Lothloriengaladriel (as if there is anyone else here) hello

Lothloriengaladriel's avatar

you always make me feel better zen, <3 remember? lol

Zen's avatar

Thanks dear, yes, you were my first <3

Bluefreedom's avatar

I’m neither of those. I have servants who do my hunting and gathering for me.

Zen's avatar

@Bluefreedom Right. Look sharp, the CO is coming.

WifeOfBath's avatar

I am both the hunter and gatherer when I feel the need to be.

MissAnthrope's avatar

I think I’m more of a gatherer, in that I think I would enjoy that activity more than hunting. To note, while men have been the predominant hunters over time, they certainly were not the only ones hunting. I would also like to note that gatherers are more productive in terms of energy spent to food amassed than hunters. So even if women were relegated to the gathering duties, they were providing the bulk of the group’s food.

The image of hunting as a masculine activity is widespread and is probably correct in a strictly statistical sense. But historically, women were hunters. Herodotus reports that among the Sauromatae, Iranian nomads of the western steppe, women often hunted on horseback with their husbands and on their own, and Xenophon praises the goodness of both male and female hunters. In many societies aristocratic women were expected to participate in the royal hunt. One of the stories in the Oghuz epics speaks of a qatun, “princess,” or “consort,” who rides, shoots, and hunts well, proving herself worthy of her husband. The wives of Qitan rulers hunted as a matter of course and Jahangir’s wives and concubines shot deer with guns during ring hunts and downed tigers from elephants..(Link)

More examples if you read further at the above link.

Zen's avatar

You said: ”...that gatherers are more productive in terms of energy spent to food amassed than hunters.”

Prove it. I completely disagree. I’d like to hear why you think so first, please. Thanks for your coment, it was refreshing and neatly written and spaced.

MissAnthrope's avatar

It’s true. To begin with, meat does not make up the majority of the human diet, even though we tend to place quite a lot of emphasis on it and we think we eat more than we actually do. In any case, I’m quite confident in my assertion here; I have taken both Anthropology and a hunting class (the latter not really by choice), so I’d be happy to. Let me find some sources.

MissAnthrope's avatar

Okay..

…Vegetable foods are abundant, sedentary, and predictable. They grow in the same place year after year, and the gatherer is guaranteed a day’s return of food for a day’s expenditure of energy. Game animals, by contrast, are scarce, mobile, unpredictable, and difficult to catch. A hunter has no guarantee of success and may in fact go for days or weeks without killing a large mammal. During the study period, there were eleven men in the Dobe camp, of whom four did no hunting at all. The seven active men spent a total 78 man-days hunting, and this work input yielded 18 animals killed, or one kill for every four man-days of hunting. The probability of any one hunter making a kill on a given day was 0.23. By contrast, the probability of a woman finding plant food on a given day was 1.00. In other words, hunting and gathering are not equally felicitous subsistence alternatives.

Consider the productivity per man-hour of the two kinds of subsistence activities. One man-hour of hunting produces about 100 edible calories, and of gathering, 240 calories. Gathering is thus seen to be 2.4 times more productive than hunting. In short, hunting is a high-risk, low return subsistence activity, while gathering is a low-risk, high-return subsistence activity.
(Link)

A number of studies have noted that hunter-gatherers devote large amounts of time and energy to hunting, even when gathering plant food or farming would have maximized energy-return rates. For example, virtually all South American horticulturalists obtain much higher caloric return rates from farming than they do from hunting or fishing, yet most spend considerably more time hunting and fishing than farming.
(Another Link)

IBERnineD's avatar

I hunt bargains at the grocery store, I got a rotisserie chicken for three bucks once and a pre-made salad for 99 cents!!! As for gathering, I tend to collect things I don’t need like flattened pennies.

shilolo's avatar

[mod says] Please refrain from chatty, inside, one-word, txtspeak conversations. Thanks.

IBERnineD's avatar

@shilolo was that for my answer?

shilolo's avatar

@IBERnineD No. Your answer is appropriate.

DREW_R's avatar

I am a hunter. I love the stalk, the thrill of the chase, the thrill hearing the release of an arrow and it slamming home, knowing that it has done it’s job only because I did mine. I love the satisfaction of honouring the animal that will grace my table and feed my children and not have all of the shit in it that market meat has in it.

DREW_R's avatar

@AlenaD

Guess I am out of the norm. I cook extra meat, when I make our meals, so that I have something to snack on instead of candy and the such. Of course I also have a nice large garden. ;)

Zen's avatar

@DREW_R So you are a hunter, literally! (Me, I’m a hinter.)

Zen's avatar

@IBERnineD I like humourous answers, and hunting for bargains is great. I’m curious, because I also love flattened pennies: do you put them on the train tracks? Because if you do, it’s not only against the law, but dangerous (you could get run over) and also could derail a little train, or the service car.

Thanks for your cooperation.

(www.Trainsafetyinspector.com

IBERnineD's avatar

I actually have two that my father flattened the traditional way when he was younger. However I make my flattened pennies at those machines where you pick a picture and then spin the steering wheel to smash it. I love those things!

Zen's avatar

@IBERnineD Alrighty then. Glad we cleared that up. Trade ya?

Nimis's avatar

@Zen Has there ever been a recorded incident of a penny derailing a little train or service car?
I’ve been flattening pennies on train tracks since I was a kid. (Kind of a tradition.) Ruh oh…

Zen's avatar

@Nimis Not sure, I was kidding.

Nimis's avatar

@Zen Damn it. Where’s my tilde?
Apparently I am a sucker for statements with links. Sheesh.

hungryhungryhortence's avatar

I’m a hunter of resources and opportunities which works best by being a gatherer and liaison of people.

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