General Question

ragingloli's avatar

Do you let brandnames dictate your product preference?

Asked by ragingloli (42020points) June 8th, 2009

I just saw a show on TV where they tested this.
They had 4 cups, two of them where labelled with coca cola and pepsi, the other 2 where labelled with two no name brands.
All of the test subjects gave the brand name labelled cups higher scores than the no name labelled cups.
Here is the catch: The two no name cups were also filled with coca cola or pepsi.

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20 Answers

sandystrachan's avatar

Its all mind games coca cola company owns everything .
Brands don’t bother me i do try my best to get local food, condiments . If its a thing like a console, TV etc.. i always try sticking to what i know best Panasonic and Sony for the console .

Aethelwine's avatar

Only for beer, pizza and electronics like @sandystrachan said.

I forgot to mention feminine hygiene products. You’ve gotta be comfortable!

Judi's avatar

Between coke and Pepsi I just buy what’s on sale. With a lot of other products I go with a brand I know, even if it’s a new product just because it’s not worth my time to do the research.

dynamicduo's avatar

Absolutely not, but that’s mostly because I rarely buy brand name anythings (that’s a result of not buying a lot period). Considering my consumption habits are nothing like those of the mainstream population (I rarely buy sodas, and when I do it’s strange unique ones or a trusty standby like ginger ale), this doesn’t really surprise me.

I highly recommend to anyone who wants to be enlightened, take a marketing course to learn about all of the techniques and research that’s been poured into figuring out exactly how to make someone want widget X. Cause once you know about it, you become impervious to a lot of it, or at least you can take that step back and observe the ad without being tricked by it (as the companies would greatly prefer).

Likeradar's avatar

I’m pretty loyal to certain brands for clothing and beauty products. I’ve branched out before and felt pretty ripped off a few times, so now I stick with what I know I like.

I’ve heard that certain products are really exact some thing as other products, just with a different label and price. I don’t buy it.

ragingloli's avatar

@Likeradar

but it is true. it has to do with sales. the amount of products a company can sell under a brand with a certain price is limited, because at some point, many people are not willing to pay the price. any overhead production would have to be thrown away. the alternative is selling the overhead production under a different name and price, so that those people who rejected the more expensive brandname will now buy the cheaper no-name.

cwilbur's avatar

I don’t buy things because of the brand names, but I remember which brands I like in certain areas.

jackfright's avatar

i typically find brand names sometimes useful as a guide for product support.
i.e. products X and Y are for all intents and purposes the same, but i’ve experienced better support from the X company, so the next time i have an option to buy X or Y, i’ll buy X.

obviously, this doesn’t apply to consumables such as canned drinks, etc. but it’s how brand names affect me when i’m buying equipment and the like.

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

if a particular brand consistently delivers superior products then you tend to look at that brand first but it’s important not to let history influence your objectivity.

ragingloli's avatar

@The_Compassionate_Heretic
the thing is, that history does influence your objectivity subconciously.
as the test showed, people will think that one product is superior to another identical product, simply because of the label in conjunction with memories of past experience.

The_Compassionate_Heretic's avatar

@ragingloli It’s true that we identify with branding in terms of taste but I was thinking more of electronics when I read this question. Electronics have a more measurable standard of performance.

sandystrachan's avatar

Destroy the coca cola brand stop drinkin tea and coffee . And drink IRN-BRU instead of coke and pepsi

hungryhungryhortence's avatar

Brand names are only as good as the quality they deliver. For example, Mercedes Benz once made quality cars across their model line until they decided to reach a wider client base and started building “entry level models” of much lower price and quality which tarnished the overall brand image.

YARNLADY's avatar

I buy based almost entirely on the unit price. I don’t choose according to the package price, but per/ounce. I have seen two identical looking cans of coffee with the same price, but one has 32 oz, and the other has 36 oz. I’ll take the larger.

Darwin's avatar

I often buy based on unit price. However, with certain products that is a false economy. Specifically it applies to mayonnaise, hot sauce and sour cherry jam.

Likeradar's avatar

@ragingloli Interesting! Do you know what products this applies to? Specific brands would be great if you know them, but also is it food, clothing, makeup, etc?

ragingloli's avatar

@Likeradar
it is mostly food and drinks, stuff that is mass produced.
here is a small list (in german):

http://www.vnr.de/artikel/Markenprodukte+beim+Discounter.html

Likeradar's avatar

@ragingloli Thanks for the link!

Strauss's avatar

I go for brand names if I have a preference, such as flavor or quality. I also shop for quality, and in that case, brand names play no part in my decision.

An example of marketing, and paying for convenience: interesting that my local convenience store provides a 20 oz. (US) bottle of Coke at $1.49, 1 Liter bottles of Coke at 2 for $3.00, and a 2 Liter bottle for $1.79.

jackfright's avatar

Just a few more thoughts on this question.

I think by default most people do make choices based on brand if they can afford it.
because if you think about it, a brand is nothing more than identity recognition. much the same way you recognize your siblings or your parents, you associate traits to these identities. brands are the same, except applied to an entire group of products and the people who make the product.

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