General Question

LostInParadise's avatar

Does the word exceed have an antonym?

Asked by LostInParadise (24750points) February 8th, 2010

By which I mean a single word that can be grammatically substituted for it. I checked an online thesaurus and it did not list any antonyms for exceed. It would seem that such words would be useful to talk about something staying below some threshold value. Are there other such words in English lacking antonyms?

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42 Answers

gailcalled's avatar

Well, if one follows the Latin (extrovert vs. introvert, exhibit vs. inhibit, for example), it should be inceed.

Exdeed, given the penchant for the freedom to make up words today, why not?

Dr_Dredd's avatar

Fall short? (I know it’s two words, but…)

nikipedia's avatar

Undershoot is close…

stranger_in_a_strange_land's avatar

I was thinking of shortfall, but it’s a clumsy fit.

Snarp's avatar

@Dr_Dredd I feel like there’s a way to say that in one word, and it’s on the tip of my tongue but I just can’t think of it. Maybe I’m just imagining it.

gailcalled's avatar

@nikipedia: “Undershoot” is an incellent answer.

Snarp's avatar

Hmm, the online thesaurus I checked suggests “fail” as an antonym.

gailcalled's avatar

@Snarp: Wouldn’t fail be an antonym of succeed?.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

Damn. Now you have me trying to think of an antonym for antonym.

I did love inceed & inactly, though.

DominicX's avatar

Well, I think “inceed” should be a word. I make up English words based on Latin all the time, like “pervention”, which is the act or instance of arriving somewhere.

lloydbird's avatar

I think that @gailcalled has nailed it.
But humbly offer Lag.
As a backup

Snarp's avatar

@gailcalled Hey don’t blame me, the internet said it. But yes, it would, but I think it could be used as an antonym of exceed too. Maybe its a stretch, but I could see it. “George exceeds the standard.” “George fails the standard.” It’s a little weird and awkward of course since it would normally be “George fails.” or “George fails to meet the standard.”

Pretty_Lilly's avatar

How about the phrase “Obama’s campaign promises”

gailcalled's avatar

@Snarp: I exceed the speed limit. I fail the speed limit? Awkward, at best. So is “I inceed the speed limit.”

It’s all intremely confusing.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

@gailcalled I know that you’re inaggerating.

Snarp's avatar

@gailcalled Hmm, I didn’t think of that use first. There’s got to be a word, and if there’s not we should adopt yours immediately. This situation must be remedied even if it means inhaustive study.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

@gailcalled I’m getting intremely tired of this now. Not one intra word out of you, please.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

@gailcalled this whole conversation has been an inorbitant waste of time. (I can’t wait until we do “pro”, “con” and “anti”. Speaking of which, is a pronyn the antonym of antonym?)

Snarp's avatar

If there’s a pronoun is there an antinoun?

CyanoticWasp's avatar

@Snarp aren’t you thinking of an amateur noun?

gailcalled's avatar

Or a semi-pronoun?

Snarp's avatar

Are pronouns allowed in the Olympics (I guess I’m dating myself a bit with that one)

LostInParadise's avatar

Undershoot is close, but it inceeds being an exact fit. Undershooting implies a delilberate attempt to reach some goal and not reaching it. Exceed does not necessarily imply a deliberate attempt to reach any goal.

janbb's avatar

Subseed?

janbb's avatar

@gailcalled What is the opposite of supercalifragilisticexpealladocious?

janbb's avatar

@gailcalled IDK; I’ve got a headache and was just trying to play. Will try again another time.

gailcalled's avatar

So if I said, Supercalifragilistic-inpialidocious, I’d probably also get a headache?

Feel better, please.

janbb's avatar

@gailcalled Hope not, sweetie. I’m going to go try to sleep mine off. I’ve missed punning with you lately.

LostInParadise's avatar

I think there are other words needing exact antonyms. For example consider the word magnify. Decrease is close but not exact in that magnify can refer to an increase in the appearance of something.

Would you say the words exaggerate and downplay are antonyms? It seems to me that there are differences. You could say someone exaggerated the importance of what he did but it does not sound right to say that someone downplayed the importance of what he did.

janbb's avatar

Thinking about it post-headache, I think the phrase “fails to meet” is the best antonym; I can’t think of a single word. In our business employees’ evaluations, the categories were “Exceeds expectations”. “Meets expectations” and “Fails to meet expectations.”

LostInParadise's avatar

Like “undershoot”, “fails to meet” works in some cases but not others. One can not fail to meet the speed limit and temperatures do not fail to meet the freezing point of water.

janbb's avatar

How about “fails to reach”? But I agree, I don’t think there is an exact antonym that works in every case.

CyanoticWasp's avatar

@janbb I think you need another category for some employees, called “Fails to Grasp” basic requirements. But I guess that’s off-topic.

janbb's avatar

@CyanoticWasp Maybe jsut “fails“would cover it all?

palabattle's avatar

Hi LostInParadise,

There is another way for the term exceed. Look at this example:

The number of excess (deficiency) hours of worker per day.

The sentence above means the number of hours that a worker work more or lesser than the limit hours per day.

Hope this will helpful to you.
Kim Sa

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