General Question

shockvalue's avatar

What's the actual MPG of your prius?

Asked by shockvalue (5797points) March 21st, 2008

I’ve had one since late 2006, and despite all the fancy ads I’m finding myself at the pump rather frequently. I think last time I checked I was averaging 34 MPG. Anyone getting better? Worse?

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13 Answers

jessie's avatar

My mom has had a Prius since mid-2006. She currently averages about 47 or 48 MPG. Although she lives in a suburb of New York City and does a lot of city driving. Apparently the Prius does better in urban, high-traffic environments than highways.

65Stang's avatar

the prius is a hybrid, meaning it uses it’s battery and some gas in the city, and all gas on highways. Hope this helps. :)

robhaya's avatar

We have a 07 Prius and get from 45 – 50 mpg in the city. On the Highway we actually get 50 MPG or better. My wife drives the car daily and I get to drive it on weekends, but she only fills up every 2 to 2 1/2 weeks and gets about 400 -450 Miles driven before filling up.

Driving on the highway the prius does quite well as mentioned before and I drive at an average of 65 – 75 MPH. And if you get your car up to the desired speed (i.e. 65 MPH) and ease up on the gas pedal to maintain slight pressure on it will help with keeping your speed and you consumption steady.

Good Luck!
R

syz's avatar

Those numbers seem awfully disappointing. I have a 2002 Honda Civic that gets 38mpg city and 40–41 highway. So far hybrids seem like not that much better for a whole lot more money.

shockvalue's avatar

well now I’m just depressed.

thanks for sharing everyone. maybe I’ll go complain to my local Toyota dealer because this just seems ridiculous.

65Stang's avatar

get a Yaris -40 mpg for $10,000!

nikipedia's avatar

I totally support finding alternative energy sources but the Prius doesn’t do that. I always felt like it was basically a scam.

squirbel's avatar

The prius is a step in the right direction. It isn’t fully dependent on fuel, making it perfect for city driving that doesn’t push past 40–45. People who live in suburbs are not going to get 50 mpg.

dvchuck's avatar

we own 2 ‘07. In warm months we average 50 to 53 mpg on the highway. In winter less. In the city more like 38 to 42 mpg, but we usually only drive very short distances.

Hope this helps.

nikipedia's avatar

The Prius actually is fully dependent on fuel. It just recaptures the energy you lose when you brake.

susanc's avatar

I have a 2004 Prius and it averages 45 mpg, which was not as promised. I too had a
Honda Civic in the 80’s which delivered a routine 53 mpg city and highway combined.
We bought the Prius for the same reason a lot of people do: it looks so distinct that everyone can identify it as a hybrid and that makes us feel like people think we’re good citizens, even though a Kia would make us better ones…. It’s a “message” car. It’s a very nice car to drive and is well designed for cargo hauling. New battery is going to kill us when the time comes.

kevbo's avatar

Google “hypermiler” for driving tips to increase mileage with the Prius.

robmandu's avatar

People do not buy a Prius to “save money on gas”. They buy it to simply “consume less gas”.

If you’re just looking to save money and get great gas mileage, then a Yaris or old Geo Metro is the way to go. If you want to reduce your carbon footprint slightly because every little bit helps, and don’t mind paying extra to do it, then get the Prius. Or move to a major metro area with decent mass transport.

The price premium for a hybrid drivetrain will take something like ten years to recoup just in gas savings. Hence why automakers have realized that people willing to pay a premium usually want a premium vehicle, thus explaining the Lexus line of über-expensive luxury hybrids.

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