General Question

srmorgan's avatar

Basketball: Why would you allow an opponent to try to shoot a three when a foul would limit them to only two points?

Asked by srmorgan (6768points) March 23rd, 2008

Watching the end of Davidson vs. Georgetown. 15 seconds to go, Davidson up by 6, Georgetown inbounds and runs the court to score a three, but if Davidson fouls, Georgetown would be limited to only two points? Why don’t you foul? Is it better to run the time off the clock as opposed to keeping one point off the scoreboard?

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13 Answers

oneye1's avatar

if you foul outside the three point line they get three free throws

oneye1's avatar

and if they make it and a foul they get one so it could be a 4point

topserb96's avatar

if u foul them not on a shot attempt (outside the 3 pt line) it is still only 2 free throws(if in the bonus). But with a lead u would rather give up a low percentage shot that will keep the clock running, because with the lead the clock is ur friend.

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srmorgan's avatar

Thanks to all ..
SRM

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oneye1's avatar

I just read the NCAA rules on it you get 3 free throws and you keep the ball

topserb96's avatar

that’s on intentional fouls right?

oneye1's avatar

no NCAA section br135

bassist_king1's avatar

also, you don’t wanna get fouled out of the game, so you can’t be doing that all the time, and most coaches tell you no fouls even during those situations.

topserb96's avatar

there r fouls that always occur outside the parameter. N never 3 ft’s n ball occur. That must be some special situation cuz I’ve never seen that.

oneye1's avatar

maybe I read it wrong look it up

bigwei's avatar

It all depends on the score and how much time is left. Since Davidson was up by six with 15 seconds left, all they had to do was play tight defense without fouling. Georgetown made the shot, but at the same time the clock was running, which is good for Davidson. If Davidson fouled in that situation, Georgetown would’ve had the opportunity to score with the clock stopped, assuming they made their freethrows. All that does is extend the game for Georgetown. That’s why they didn’t foul.

Now let’s say Davidson was instead up by three with five seconds left and it was Georgetown’s ball. This would be a good time to foul right away because they would only get two freethrows. Assuming they make both, Davidson would get the ball back and most likely run out the clock.

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