General Question

lovelyy's avatar

Is there a book you would recommend?

Asked by lovelyy (1132points) March 26th, 2008 from iPhone

Recently I’ve had a lot of time on my hands what book would you recommend?

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49 Answers

Poser's avatar

Anthem by Ayn Rand. Or, if you have a lot of time, Atlas Shrugged by the same author.

richardhenry's avatar

What kind of stuff do you like reading?

delirium's avatar

Neil Gaiman.

Anything by him.

Good omens by he and terry pratchett is great!

Do you like science books?
What are your feelings towards dead things?

Riser's avatar

“Amusing ourselves to Death” by Postman

jrpowell's avatar

Herman Hesse. Anything by him is good.

lovelyy's avatar

I would like to read something meaningful or something with suspense, or just anything that would change my life in some way. I recently finished reading ‘a million little pieces’ I loved it you guys should read it.
<3

Poser's avatar

I second myself.

lovelyy's avatar

thanks everyone for your suggestions, I’ll be sure to check them out.
<3

jrpowell's avatar

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse is one of the books I have read that I consider “life changing.”

It as a short read and it is wonderful.

lovelyy's avatar

@delirium science books are not my favorite but I will read them. as for the dead things, do you mean just reading about death? If so I do like reading about of.
<3

delirium's avatar

Well…. reading about science of what to do with bodies after they’re dead.
And american funerary practices.

Trustinglife's avatar

@lovelyy, you said meaningful and suspense, and the Da Vinci Code came to mind. Have you read it?

What are some of your other favorite books?

lovelyy's avatar

@delirium i’ve never actually been interested but I might just read some. are the books you recommended about that?

Riser's avatar

The Psychology of Killing in War and Society

kevbo's avatar

@Riser, glad you mentioned that one again. Is that the same as On killing : the psychological cost of learning to kill in war and society by Dave Grossman?

richardhenry's avatar

I once read a book on the history and practice of cryptography, which I can’t remember the name of. Stuff like that is generally pretty fascinating anyway, especially if you have time to kill. “The Psychology of Killing in War and Society” also sounds pretty good.

I should read more fiction.

Riser's avatar

Yes Kevbo. Thank you. My copy is in my office otherwise I would have presented the title accurately. It’s a phenomenal book.

Richard: War and Society is about the “non-firing” ratio of soldiers in various wars. Its focus is on what the military has done to change this ratio and at what psychological cost to our soldiers. It’s a remarkable book.

delirium's avatar

The american way of death: Jessica Mittford.

Stiff: Maggie Estep

lovelyy's avatar

@trustinglife I actually havent read it, I plan to one day seeing how i’ve already seen the movie Its not really at the top of my list.

‘a million little pieces by James Frey ‘crank by ellen Hopkins’ I have more but don’t feel like naming or trying to remember the authors. : )
<3

Trustinglife's avatar

Different kind of suggestion: I am reading a fascinating book called Embracing Our Selves, by Hal Stone and Sidra Winkelman.

It is about investigating the voices in our head that often say conflicting things. Inspired by this book, I dialogued with my “inner critic” voice today and it went from criticizing and tearing me down to constructively challenging me. Rocked my world!

richardhenry's avatar

@riser: Between you and the blurb, I’ve been sold and ordered a copy. I’ll let you know what I thought (when I actually get some time to read it, which hopefully should be when I go away in May).

Trustinglife's avatar

Oh, the Da Vinci Code film version didn’t come close to touching the intelligence and suspense of the book. I couldn’t put it down.

richardhenry's avatar

@Trustinglife: Damn, that film was bad. So bad. @lovelyy: The film doesn’t compare at all, but to be honest – read “Angels and Demons” first. It’s much better.

delirium's avatar

All of his books are EXACTLY the same plot. If you read one, you’ve read them all.

Riser's avatar

The film is grossly misunderstood but that is for a different question and I won’t contribute to off-topic rhetoric.

richardhenry's avatar

@delirium: Perhaps a little true, but they are all generally quite good. Read Angels… first though. (In my opinion, I don’t think they were worth the hype they got though. Especially The Da Vinci Code.)

lovelyy's avatar

@trustinglife whoa that makes me want to read it more ha, I liked the movie so I’m guessing I’ll love the book. @richardhenry who is the author of that book? @delirium i do hope I get in to his books.
<3

richardhenry's avatar

@lovelyy: Dan Brown, same as The Da Vinci Code. It is worth a read if you have the time.

TheDeadWake's avatar

I can’t remember the title, but there’s a book that compiles the letters of that Vincent Van Gogh wrote to his brother during his life. I’ll try and find it/ the title.

delirium's avatar

@RH They’re not bad. Its just frustrating to read his non-da vinci code series books and realize that its the same plot. Digital Fortress was the best. Deception point was the second best. Angels and demons comes in third, and code comes last for me.

richardhenry's avatar

@delirium: I’d say Angels and Demons, Deception Point, Digital Fortress, The Da Vinci Code.

delirium's avatar

Hahaha. We’ll have to agree to disagree. I’m not going to fight for my reasons because its been so many years since I read them. I just remember my preferences.

El_Cadejo's avatar

@richardhenry i read all of those books not to long ago and agree completely with your order. I wonder why Da Vinci Code was so popular when Angels and Demons was sooooo much better.

richardhenry's avatar

@uberbatman: My guess is the mystery is the appeal, instead of the actual writing.

@delirium: I just realised our orders are in perfect reverse, bar Code… :) haha they all come in relatively close anyway, so our disagreement is really only an agreement in the first place. Or something.

delirium's avatar

RH: I’m not sure the order matters when we both liked whatever we read first enough to keep reading all of them. ;)

Trustinglife's avatar

this conversation is inspiring me to read Angels and Demons. If it’s the best and all.

Trustinglife's avatar

And the book Eat Pray Love was amazing too. Highly recommended.

breedmitch's avatar

“A Year In Provence” by Peter Mayle. Great writing but not at all taxing. A worthwhile time-consumer.

andrew's avatar

I would strongly advise against Da Vinci Code, though I heard it on audio tape and the ridiculousness of it might be heightened in audio form.

I also loved A Million Little Pieces. You might want to consider The Tao of Pooh. Pick up Miranda July‘s collection of short stories.

[fluther plug]: Remember! You can link to books on amazon by doing [“link name” : amazon : keywords to search] (without the spaces). Fluther gets a cut!

oneye1's avatar

purpose driving life or if you like dogs saving sprite

sadia's avatar

“the better of mcsweeny’s” is a great selection of short stories. not sue if you’re into compilations but it lets you experience the styles of different writers.

srmorgan's avatar

I am almost finished with LUSH LIFE by Richard Price.
Great book, good depiction of modern-day life on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.
SRM

iriemuffin's avatar

Towing Jehovah by James Morrow. Fiction. Philosophical. One of my top ten favs.

dpena2009's avatar

I’d suggest Velocity or The Good Guy by Dean Koontz. They’re really exciting books and very suspenseful!

jstringham21's avatar

The Catcher In The Rye

Great book!

stevenb's avatar

late answer, but for history I like Undaunted Courage, about Lewis and Clark. Very good book. Also, for sci-fi/fantasy, try David Eddings the Belgariad. The way he paints the people and relationships and scenes in my mind changed my life and the way I read.

atlantis's avatar

The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. Very moving and deep.

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