General Question

john65pennington's avatar

When the manufacturer makes peanut butter, are the shells also used?

Asked by john65pennington (29080 points ) May 10th, 2011

Question: if the peanut shells are not ground with the peanuts, to make peanut butter, then how are the shells separated from the peanut inside?

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11 Answers

Kayak8's avatar

Here is a video of making peanut butter.

klutzaroo's avatar

Probably with the machine designed to deal with that.

Kayak8's avatar

The peanuts come to the factory already shelled.

klutzaroo's avatar

Yes, @Kayak8. But at some point they go through the shelling machine.

john65pennington's avatar

Kayak8, thanks. I watched the 4 minute video and now I am an informed person of how peanut butter is made.

I still would like to know how they separate the shells from the peanuts.

WasCy's avatar

Have you ever eaten peanuts with the shells? That is, just pop the unshelled legume into your mouth and crunch away? (I don’t do boiled or raw peanuts; I’m talking about ‘regular’ peanuts in the shell.)

For some reason they taste more like peanut butter when I’m crunching away on the shell, too. I can’t figure it out.

klutzaroo's avatar

@john65pennington Perhaps clicking on links might help with that.

Brian1946's avatar

The Whole Foods that I go to, has peanut butter making machines with transparent tubs. From what I can see, the peanuts are thoroughly shelled.

BarnacleBill's avatar

Peanut shells can be used in animal feed.

john65pennington's avatar

Klutzaroo, do all of those machines just shell peanuts? I would like to see peanut shelling in a video.

WasCy's avatar

This is one of the video links you could have clicked on, @john65pennington. This machine shown in this video is giving people in Uganda dreams of being budding capitalists. I love it.

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