General Question

Randy's avatar

Is there a substantial difference in a 2.2 ghz and 2.4 ghz processor?

Asked by Randy (11163 points ) February 26th, 2008 from iPhone

I’m going to buy a MacBook and I was wondering if there was a big enough difference to get excited about.

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6 Answers

sferik's avatar

Nope, not really.

Technically, it’s 9% faster, but only when the processor is the bottleneck, which it will rarely be on a notebook with a 5400 RPM hard drive, 667MHz memory, and a 800MHz bus. The vast majority of the time those extra processor cycles will be idling.

Spargett's avatar

That depends on how much video rendering you do. Other than that, not much.

sferik's avatar

It’s true that video rendering will push your processor’s clock to the limit, but if you’re planning on doing a lot of video rendering, a MacBook is probably not the right machine for you.

skwerl88's avatar

I strongly doubt there would be a noticeable difference between the two. Even when using the computer to its fullest potential, it wouldn’t be the processor holding it back from going further, it would probably be the memory (since. its slow, in comparison to the bus speed of the processor). In essence, even though you would have .3 more ghz’s processing power, your computer wouldn’t be able to “think it” quite so quickly, because of that delay.
Also, because the hard drive on the macbook is 5400 as previously stated, the computer wouldn’t be able to do anything with that data as quickly as it was thought out either.
To summarize: 2.4 would be, in practice, overkill.

chaosrob's avatar

Apple tends to bundle specs into groups, so while the actual difference in processor speed is small, going to the lower speed might also reduce hard drive size or RAM. Watch out for unacceptable changes.

patg7590's avatar

about 200 Mhz
;-)

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