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Eggie's avatar

Is moving to the United States with just my Bachelors Degree a good idea?

Asked by Eggie (5162 points ) August 14th, 2014

I just thought instead of doing my Masters Degree in my home country for two years, I should just get my ticket and go to the US with my Bachelors degree in teaching and try my luck there instead. A school may hire me and then I would be able to do my Masters there. Is that a good idea?

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23 Answers

talljasperman's avatar

You would need a student visa. They are hard to get, and are limited.

trailsillustrated's avatar

NO I did this and it’s hell hard to convert it when you go back home. I did it through profeesional shool.

SQUEEKY2's avatar

I don’t think so.

dappled_leaves's avatar

Are you in Canada? Compare the tuition fees first, and remember that wherever you end up in the US, you’ll probably pay foreign student fees, which are usually even higher.

Eggie's avatar

Even if I get a student visa to a college in the US, how am I going to pay college tuition? I think I will just do my online Masters Degree program in my country (Trinidad) first and then when I am completed that I will travel and take my chances.

trailsillustrated's avatar

@Eggie you wouldn’t be able to, fees for out of country students are horrendous. Do your master’s there and then go over on the point system. If you like it, that will provide an entry point to stay.

Eggie's avatar

@trailsillustrated To go over there now, I would need a job. No school is going to hire me because I am an alien. So I would have to apply to a college by scholarship; can’t do that because my grades aren’t so good. I can try to apply to a college down here first, but then even if the college grants me a place there, how am I going to pay college tuition there? I would have to work under the table and have a place to stay.
I have already enrolled in an online Masters degree program here and I have taken a loan to pay the tuition. The cost is pretty hefty, but I can see my way paying it, but I am worried that I would end up in the same predicament even after I finish it and want to go to the US.

trailsillustrated's avatar

When you finish, apply for a visa under the points system. That way you can go and get a job. And if you like it, it’s a path to stay permanently. It’s very hard to get into the us and VERY hard to get a job even under the table. I was asked for proof of being legally there at every job. There are lots of ways to find a place to stay, but that would be your smallest problem. Wait till you finish your degree.

Eggie's avatar

@trailsillustrated What is the points system? Are you talking about when I finish my Masters?

trailsillustrated's avatar

Yes, when you finish your master’s. The points system is a type visa that allows you to stay and work based on your age and skills. You are awarded a series of points based on the need of your occupation, your english skills, your age.

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Eggie's avatar

Would I need a sponsor job for that? The point system I mean.

trailsillustrated's avatar

I don’t think so, you fill up the forms, with proof, you have to take an English exam, it’s mountains of paperwork and expensive, then you are evaluated. I don’t know if you need a sponsor or not, go to their immigration website, google stuff like work visas for the us etc. It’ll bring up their government website where you can read about it all.

trailsillustrated's avatar

I did it 1000 years ago so Im sure it’s changed especially post 911

Eggie's avatar

I have googled it, but I haven’t heard of anything called the points system. Ill check for that. FYI I was thinking of marrying an American girl when I get there but I hear it takes 3 years to get citizenship via that route

trailsillustrated's avatar

you get a green card right away if you marry.. That’s the same as citizenship. And I don’t know if it’s called the points system there, can’t remember but google, students in the us, immigration to the us, stuff like that.

trailsillustrated's avatar

^ almost the same. A green card’s good for ten years I think.

stanleybmanly's avatar

I would think that your chances for a superior education at a much lower cost would be markedly better in England. Aren’t you folks still part of the Commonwealth? I realize that there’s this understandable fixation with the United States, but the economics of living here for those without money have ratcheted beyond brutality.

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Response moderated
Buttonstc's avatar

There are numerous school systems in the US which are desperate for teachers. Granted, they are located usually in poor rural areas or the inner city which have problems attracting teachers.

But you may find an area where it’s doable for a few years, depending upon your temperament.

dappled_leaves's avatar

If you want to study and work abroad, do look into other countries than the US. As @stanleybmanly said, the UK could be a good option; so might Canada. But be sure to verify the tuition costs for students from your specific country – they can vary widely for foreign students. This is one way universities with otherwise low tuition make their money.

Eggie's avatar

I have been looking at England. I intend to work abroad not necessarily study abroad. I think England is a wonderful place for me because I could get to explore Europe, but I do not know anyone there. Also, my Masters is from a US based University so wouldn’t it be harder for me there?

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